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ISAT Physical Development and Health Performance Definitions
Grade 7

Exceeds StandardsMeets StandardsBelow StandardsAcademic Warning

EXCEEDS STANDARDS

Standards 19A, 19B, 19C
Students are able to consistently sequence, with control, locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative movements in a specific game or sport situation. Students at the Exceeds Standards level can apply sport skills in a game like situation using the correct form (e.g., fielding a ground ball to throw to first base).

Students at the Exceeds Standards level are accurately able to identify correct and incorrect movement patterns. (e.g., performing a dance sequence that combines traveling, balancing, and weight transfer).

Students can consistently apply the rules and safety practices used in games, activities, or sports. Students at this level recognize and apply basic offensive and defensive strategies. They are consistently able to apply cooperative strategies in physical activity.

Standards 20A, 20B, 20C
Students at the Exceeds Standards level can recognize and describe the benefits and elements of health-related fitness. They can consistently identify proper activities appropriate for warm-up and cool down and the reason for using them. Students can also accurately define principles of training (FITT: frequency, intensity, time, and type) in a physical activity. A student at this level regularly participates in and can describe the benefits of activities designed to improve and maintain muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular function. They also have an understanding of how exercise affects body composition.

Students at this level can consistently assess their own fitness levels through a variety of methods (e.g., pulse monitor, RPE). They can accurately calculate and record their own resting and target heart rate. Students can consistently participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate. Students at this level can regularly evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a personal fitness profile and select activities to improve.

Students at the Exceeds Standards level understand how to write a realistic, long and short-term, fitness goal based on fitness levels. They can then choose from a list of activities to accomplish the goal. Students consistently recognize opportunities within the community for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., swimming, community walks and runs, park district programs). They can also identify facilities within the community to use for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., parks, ice rinks, tennis courts). Students at this level can use the principles of training (FITT) when writing a plan to meet fitness goals. They consistently implement healthy behavioral choices as part of a fitness program.

Standards 21A, 21B
Students are capable of participating in a variety of group and/or individual activities. Students consistently demonstrate the ability to remain on task when participating in activities for a designated period of time. They are able to follow rules and safety procedures with limited intervention by the instructor or fellow classmates. Students consistently recognize their abilities and skill levels. They show respect and tolerance for the skill levels and abilities of fellow classmates. They are capable of assisting classmates with skill mastery when needed. Students are consistently familiar with individual roles in a group physical activity and fill this role to make the activity successful. When the group dynamics are not working, students are capable of identifying what personal behaviors need to be changed. Students are consistently able to work on individually assigned tasks independently until completion.

Students are consistently able to complete assigned tasks with a partner or group within a specific time frame. These students recognize the need for goal-setting to accomplish partner and group activities. They are able to set individual and group goals to accomplish these tasks. Students are also able to work cooperatively with a partner or other groups’ members when participating in physical activities to accomplish desired outcomes.

Standards 22A, 22B, 22C
Students consistently show that they have knowledge and actively demonstrate skills in reducing health risks. Students demonstrate how positive health practices, such as diet and exercise, can help reduce health risks, such as cancer and heart disease.

Students explain and demonstrate how to use safety precautions in practical situations when dealing with motor vehicles, bicycles, in and near water, and as a pedestrian. Students are able to compare and contrast several careers that are involved in health promotion, health care, and injury prevention. Students are able to describe and demonstrate how an individual influences the health and well being of the people around them (hygiene, volunteerism, disaster preparedness). Students are able to describe environmental issues that may affect the health of the local community (air, water, and land pollution). Students are able to discuss and implement potential solutions to community environmental issues.

Standards 23A, 23B, 23C
Students are able to explain and demonstrate how the body systems interact with one another. Students consistently explain and demonstrate the effects of positive life-style behaviors on the body systems. Students are able to describe the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence.

Standards 24A, 24B, 24C
Students at the Exceeds Standards level promote and enhance health and well being through the use of effective communication and decision-making skills. The students consistently describe the consequences of violence in school and in the community and demonstrate by being positive role models. The students are able to describe how to solve interpersonal differences through avoidance, compromise, and cooperation. The students consistently describe ways to positively communicate and maintain relationships at school, at home, and at the workplace. Students are able to compare and contrast the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence. The students discuss refusal and negotiation techniques that apply to potentially harmful situations.

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MEETS STANDARDS

Standards 19A, 19B, 19C
Students are usually able to sequence with control locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative movements in a specific game or sport situation. Students at the Meets Standards level can apply sport skills in a game-like situation using the correct form (e.g., fielding a ground ball to throw to first base).

Students at this level are usually able to identify correct and incorrect movement patterns. (e.g., performing a dance sequence that combines some traveling, balancing, and weight transfer).

Students can usually apply the rules and safety practices used in games, activities, and sports. Students at the Meets Standards level usually recognize and apply basic offensive and defensive strategies. They are usually able to apply cooperative strategies in physical activity.

Standards 20A, 20B, 20C
Students at this level can usually recognize and describe the benefits and elements of health-related fitness. They can usually identify proper activities appropriate for warm-up and cool down and the reason for using them. Students can also usually define principles of training (FITT: frequency, intensity, time, and type) in a physical activity. Students at the Meets Standards level frequently participate in and can often describe the benefits of activities designed to improve and maintain muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular function. They also usually have a good understanding of how exercise affects body composition.

Students can usually assess their own fitness levels through a variety of methods. (e.g., pulse monitor, RPE). They can usually calculate and record their own resting and target heart rate. Students can often participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate. Students at this level can usually evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a personal fitness profile and select activities for improvement.

Students usually understand how to write a realistic, long and short-term, fitness goal based on fitness levels. They can often choose from a list of activities to accomplish the goal. Students usually recognize opportunities within the community for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., swimming, community walks and runs, park district programs). They also can usually identify facilities within the community to use for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., parks, ice rinks, tennis courts). Students can use the principles of training (FITT) when writing a play to meet fitness goals. They usually implement healthy behavioral choices as part of a fitness program.

Standards 21A, 21B
Students at this level are usually capable of participating in a variety of group and/or individual activities. They are usually able to follow rules and safety procedures with limited intervention by the instructor or fellow classmates. Students often recognize their abilities and skill levels. They generally show respect and tolerance for the skill levels and abilities of fellow classmates. They frequently are capable of assisting classmates with skill mastery when needed. Students often are familiar with individual roles in a group physical activity and fill this role to make the activity successful. When the group dynamics are not working, students usually are capable of identifying what personal behaviors need to be changed. Students are commonly able to work on individually assigned tasks independently until completion.

Students are generally able to complete assigned tasks with a partner or group within a specific time frame. Meets students frequently recognize the need for goal-setting to accomplish partner and group activities. They are usually able to set individual and group goals to accomplish these tasks. Students often are also able to work cooperatively with a partner or other groups’ members when participating in physical activities to accomplish desired outcomes.

Standards 22A, 22B, 22C
Students usually show that they have knowledge in reducing health risks. They usually identify positive health practices, such as diet and exercise and how they can help reduce health risks, such as cancer and heart disease. Students explain how to use safety precautions in practical situations when dealing with motor vehicles, bicycles, in and near water, and as a pedestrian. Most of the time, these students are able to identify several careers that are involved in health promotion, health care, and injury prevention. Students usually discuss how an individual influences the health and well being of the people around them (e.g., hygiene, volunteerism, and disaster preparedness). Students generally are able to recognize environmental issues, such as air, water and land pollution, that may affect the health of the local community. Most of the time students are able to identify potential solutions to community environmental concerns.

Standards 23A, 23B, 23C
Students usually use appropriate vocabulary to discuss how the body systems interact with one another. Most of the time students are able to explain the effects of positive life-style behaviors on the body systems. Students usually identify the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence.

Standards 24A, 24B, 24C
Students usually recognize possible consequences of violence in school and communities. The students are able to identify how to solve interpersonal differences through avoidance, compromise, and cooperation. The students regularly identify ways to positively communicate and maintain relationships at school, at home, and at the workplace. The students are usually able to discuss the decision-making process for an individual health concern. Students are frequently able to discuss the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence. The students usually compare refusal and negotiation techniques that apply to potentially harmful situations.

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BELOW STANDARDS

Standards 19A, 19B, 19C
Students are occasionally able to sequence with control locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative movements in a specific game or sport situation. Students at the Below Standards level can occasionally apply sport skills in a game like situation using the correct form (e.g., fielding a ground ball to throw to first base).

Students at the Below Standards level are occasionally able to identify correct and incorrect movement patterns. (e.g., performing a dance sequence that combines some traveling, balancing, and weight transfer).

Students can occasionally apply the rules and safety practices used in games, activities, and sports. Students at the Below Standards level occasionally recognize and apply basic offensive and defensive strategies. They are occasionally able to apply cooperative strategies in physical activity.

Standards 20A, 20B, 20C
Students at the Below Standards level can occasionally recognize and describe the benefits and elements of health-related fitness. They seldom identify proper activities appropriate for warm-up and cool down and the reason for using them. Students occasionally define principles of training (FITT: frequency, intensity, time, and type) in a physical activity. Students at the Below Standards level occasionally participate in and can describe the benefits of activities designed to improve and maintain muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular function. They sometimes have an understanding of how exercise affects body composition.

Students at the Below Standards level can occasionally assess their own fitness levels through a variety of methods. (e.g., pulse monitor, RPE). They seldom calculate and record their own resting and target heart rate. Students can occasionally participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate. Students at this level can sometimes evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a personal fitness profile and can occasionally select activities for improvement.

Students at the Below Standards level occasionally understand how to write a realistic, long and short-term, fitness goal based on fitness levels. They can sometimes choose from a list of activities to accomplish the goal. Students seldom recognize opportunities within the community for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., swimming, community walks and runs, park district programs). They can sometimes identify facilities within the community to use for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., parks, ice rinks, tennis courts). Students at the Below Standards level occasionally use the principles of training (FITT) when writing a plan to meet fitness goals. They implement some healthy behavioral choices as part of a fitness program.

Standards 21A, 21B
Students at this level are sometimes capable of participating in a variety of group and/or individual activities. They are occasionally able to follow rules and safety procedures with limited intervention by the instructor or fellow classmates. Students sometimes recognize their abilities and skill levels. They sometimes show respect and tolerance for the skill levels and abilities of fellow classmates. They sometimes are capable of assisting classmates with skill mastery when needed. Students inconsistently are familiar with individual roles in a group physical activity and fill this role to make the activity successful. When the group dynamics are not working, students usually are capable of identifying what personal behaviors need to be changed. Students are commonly able to work on individually assigned tasks independently until completion.

Students occasionally are able to complete assigned tasks with a partner or group within a specific time frame. Students at the Below Standards level sometimes recognize the need for goal setting to accomplish partner and group activities. They inconsistently set individual and group goals to accomplish these tasks. Students occasionally are able to work cooperatively with a partner or other groups’ members when participating in physical activities to accomplish desired outcomes.

Standards 22A, 22B, 22C
Students occasionally demonstrate knowledge and skills in reducing health risks. Students can identify some positive health practices, such as diet and exercise, and health risks, such as cancer and heart disease. Students can occasionally identify safety precautions in practical situations when dealing with motor vehicles, bicycles, in and near water, and as a pedestrian. Students are able to identify some careers that are involved in health promotion, health care, and injury prevention. Students are able to identify some ways that an individual should have good hygiene and the negative effects of improper hygiene. Students are able to recognize some environmental issues, such as air, water, and land pollution. Students are able to identify some potential solutions to community environmental concerns.

Standards 23A, 23B, 23C
Students are able to identify some of the body systems and how they interact with one another. Students are able to recognize some of the effects of positive life-style behaviors on the body systems. Students are occasionally able to recognize relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence.

Standards 24A, 24B, 24C
Students at the Below Standards level occasionally promote and enhance health and well-being through the use of effective communication and decision-making skills.

These students sometimes are able to recognize possible course consequences of violence in school and communities. The student are able to recognize interpersonal differences through avoidance, compromise, and cooperation. The student identify ways to positively communicate and maintain relationships at school, at home, and at the workplace. The students sometimes identify the decision-making process for an individual health concern. Students are sometimes able to recognize the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence. The students sometimes recognize negotiation techniques that apply to potentially harmful situations.

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ACADEMIC WARNING

Standards 19A, 19B, 19C
Students at the Academic Warning level are rarely able to sequence with control locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative movements in a specific game or sport situation. Students at the Academic Warning level can rarely apply sport skills in a game-like situation using the correct form (e.g., fielding a ground ball to throw to first base).

Students at this level are rarely able to identify and apply correct and incorrect movement patterns (e.g., performing a dance sequence that combines some traveling, balancing, and weight transfer).

Students can rarely apply the rules and safety practices used in games, activities and sports. Students at the Academic Warning level inconsistently recognize and apply basic offensive and defensive strategies. They are seldom able to apply cooperative strategies in physical activity.

Standards 20A, 20B, 20C
A student at the Academic Warning level can rarely recognize and describe the benefits and elements of health-related fitness. They can identify few proper activities appropriate for warm-up and cool down and the reason for using them. Students can rarely define principles of training (FITT: frequency, intensity, time, and type) in a physical activity. Students at the Academic Warning level seldom participate in and can rarely describe the benefits of activities designed to improve and maintain muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular function. They rarely have an understanding of how exercise affects body composition.

Students at the Academic Warning level can rarely assess their own fitness levels through a variety of methods. (e.g., pulse monitor, RPE). They seldom calculate and record their own resting and target heart rate. Students can rarely participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate. Students at this level inconsistently evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a personal fitness profile and select few activities for improvement.

Students at this level rarely understand how to write a realistic, long and short-term, fitness goals based on fitness levels. They can seldom choose from a list of activities to accomplish the goal. Students rarely recognize opportunities within the community for regular participation in physical activities (e.g., swimming, community walks and runs, park district programs). They sometimes identify facilities within the community to use for regular participation in physical activities (e.g. parks, ice rinks, tennis courts). Students at the Academic Warning level seldom use the principles of training (FITT) when writing a plan to meet fitness goals. They rarely implement healthy behavioral choices as part of a fitness program.

Standards 21A, 21B, 21C
Students at this level are rarely capable of participating in a variety of group and/or individual activities. They are usually unable to follow rules and safety procedures with limited intervention by the instructor or fellow classmates. Students often do not recognize their abilities and skill levels. They seldom show respect and tolerance for the skill levels and abilities of fellow classmates. They usually are not capable of assisting classmates with skill mastery when needed. Students are usually not familiar with individual roles in a group physical activity and fill this role to make the activity successful. When the group dynamics are not working, students are usually not capable of identifying what personal behaviors need to be changed. Students are seldom able to work on individually assigned tasks independently until completion.

Students are rarely able to complete assigned tasks with a partner or group within a specific time frame. Students at this level rarely recognize the need for goal-setting to accomplish partner and group activities. They are usually not able to set individual and group goals to accomplish these tasks. Students are seldom able to work cooperatively with a partner or other groups’ members when participating in physical activities to accomplish desired outcomes.

Standards 22A, 22B, 22C
Students rarely demonstrate knowledge and skills in reducing health risks. Students identify a few positive health practices, such as diet and exercise, but do not know how they can help reduce health risks, such as cancer and heart disease. Students can identify safety precautions, but are not clear how they are used in dealing with motor vehicles, bicycles, in and near water, and as a pedestrian. Students are able to discuss a career that is involved in health promotion, health care, and injury prevention. Students are unable to identify how an individual should have good hygiene and the negative effects of improper hygiene. Students are able to recognize few environmental issues, such as air, water, and land pollution. Students are able to identify a few potential solutions to community environmental concerns.

Standards 23A, 23B, 23C
Students are able to identify a few of the body systems and how they interact with one another. Students are able to recognize a few of the effects of positive life-style behaviors on the body systems. Students are able to recognize a few relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence.

Standards 24A, 24B, 24C
Students rarely recognize possible consequences of violence in school and communities. They usually do not recognize interpersonal differences through avoidance, compromise, or cooperation. Studens identify a few ways to positively communicate or maintain relationships at school, at home and at the workplace. The students are usually unable to identify the decision-making process for an individual health concern. Students are usually unable to recognize the relationships among physical, mental, social, and cultural factors that affect adolescence. The students are rarely able to recognize negotiation techniques that apply to potentially harmful situations.

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