Illinois Learning Standards

Stage D - Science



Descriptors



11A —

 Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.
  1. Formulate contextual inquiry questions brainstorming questions, converting questions into hypothesis statements, researching associated scientific knowledge and skills, or identifying simple independent and dependent variables to be investigated.
  2. Propose procedural steps to investigate inquiry hypothesis applying logical sequence for investigatory process, constructing applicable data tables, selecting necessary materials and equipment, or identifying appropriate safety measures to follow.
  3. Conduct inquiry investigation collecting quantitative and qualitative data from trials, using applicable metric units, observing appropriate and necessary safety precautions, or validating data for accuracy.
  4. Construct charts and visualizations to display data choosing appropriate display media for data analysis, or incorporating available/appropriate technology.
  5. Analyze data trends summarizing inferences, explaining data points including outliers and discrepancies, or synthesizing collected data as evidence for explanations.
  6. Communicate investigation hypothesis, procedure, and explanations, presenting the results of observations and explanations orally and in written format, or generating further questions for investigation to verify or refute hypothesis or explanation.

11B —

Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.
  1. Identify a contextual technological design dilemma, brainstorming design questions for consideration (e.g., how pendulums work, how heat is transmitted), researching associated knowledge and skills, or identifying independent and dependent variables.
  2. Begin investigations into technological design, identifying design parameters, brainstorming design options and necessary materials, sketching design plans, determining logical sequence for design procedures, generating success criteria indicators, ranges and graphic display options, or identifying appropriate safety measures to follow.
  3. Construct design prototype, selecting necessary materials and equipment, or following procedural steps and necessary safety measures.
  4. Construct charts and visualizations to display data, selecting appropriate graphic display of data, recording appropriate quantitative and qualitative data from multiple trials, or incorporating technology.
  5. Analyze data to evaluate design selection or adaptability, synthesizing collected data, or comparing designs, processes, sources of error and success criteria.
  6. Communicate design solution, procedure, and explanations, preparing graphs and charts to report the results, generating future design modifications, or suggesting alternative applications for design.

12A —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the patterns of change in life cycles of plants and animals, comparing the stages within simple life cycles, examining and comparing microscopic and macroscopic life forms and their structures, or making generalizations of observed patterns.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the similarities and differences of generations of offspring, comparing and contrasting specific characteristics of offspring with their parents from immaturity to maturity (e.g., teeth, coloration, metamorphosis variations), linking characteristics (e.g., habit of walking, kind of teeth, use of appendages) among animals to changes over time.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of inheritance in structural and functional features of plants and animals, applying general rules of probability to predict characteristics of offspring from selected parents, or comparing body structures (or functions) from animal fossils that are no longer evident in contemporary animals.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of learned behavior in animals, distinguishing specific characteristics as learned or inherited in various examples, or
  5. conducting simple surveys relating to learned behaviors or attitudes of classmates.

12B  —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine relationships among organisms in their environment, diagramming a simple relationship between plants and/or animals (i.e., predator/prey, parasite/host, consumer/producer) commonly found in local habitats, describing simple food chains and webs in various habitats, considering habitat changes due to changes in moisture, temperature, or seasons, or contrasting the behavioral patterns and adaptations of organisms from different ecosystems.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the adaptations of physical features of organisms to their environments, identifying the physical features that help plants or animals survive in their environments, or reporting on a specific plant or animal which has adapted to different environments over time.

12C —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the properties of various kinds of energy, demonstrating how light travels in a straight line and can be reflected, refracted, or absorbed, experimenting with a variety of ways that heat can be produced, transmitted or absorbed, examining how sound can be detected in animals, exploring how sound is transmitted in different objects, identifying various sources of power in community resources, exploring heat distribution in the classroom or building, or explaining the interrelationships among light, heat, sound, chemical, electrical and mechanical energy.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to associate the properties of common elements, common compounds, and simple mixtures, categorizing heterogeneous and homogeneous samples, analyzing the physical and chemical properties of these samples, or distinguishing the energy requirements to separate physical and chemical combinations.

12D —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce constant, variable and periodic motion, describing examples of motions in everyday situations, exploring pendulum variations of length, mass and initial energy inputs, creating student-action models to demonstrate motions in classroom or playground activities, such as walking and running in straight lines and in circular paths.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze forces, collecting and graphing mathematical data on mechanical advantage using simple machines, comparing the relationships of weight and mass on Earth, the moon or other planets, or exploring the effect of friction in common examples.

12E —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the Earth's land, water and atmospheric conditions, describing erosion/weathering in terms of impact on features on Earth, diagramming the water cycle to explain changes that occur in the atmosphere during different weather conditions, or predicting atmospheric conditions from cloud, barometric, and other observations.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze the natural weather patterns, describing short- to long-term changes in Earth's climate, suggesting possible causes of climatic changes and effects on biotic communities, or evaluating evidence that human activities have long-term effects on global climate.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to evaluate natural resource supplies, mapping availabilities of these resources, or examining the human causes of diminished supplies of resources.

12F —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to study celestial objects in space, comparing planetary objects' composition and distances, introducing the categories of stars and their characteristics, explaining how planets change their position in the sky relative to the stars, or outlining the kinds of space research advances, risks and benefits.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to document the natural cycles and patterns in the solar system, using models of planetary orbits to predict the planets' changing positions, the Moon's changing phases, Earth's changing seasons, the visible constellations' paths, or introducing the relationship of solar system cycles to planning for space flights.

13A —

Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.
  1. Apply the appropriate principles of safety, identifying tools and proper steps for use of scientific equipment, using equipment and materials in a safe and proper manner when conducting inquiry design investigations, caring for classroom animal collections properly, identifying ways and places that chemicals can be properly stored, stating general rules to follow in case dangerous chemicals are ingested or inhaled, predicting potential causes of accidents at school, home, and in the community, or following classroom rules for preparation, procedures and clean-up.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind, recognizing the necessity of controlled variables in inquiry and design investigations, identifying faulty procedural steps which could cause different results, recording observations accurately and honestly, generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking, or contrasting hypotheses, predictions, laws, theories and assumptions.

13B —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.
  1. Apply scientific technologies, incorporating appropriate data collection, storage, retrieval and communication capabilities in classroom investigations, describing how these technologies have enabled scientists to observe phenomenon beyond the capabilities of unaided human senses (radar, microscopy, etc.).
  2. Associate the interactions of technology in science and societal situations, comparing and contrasting its impact, risks and benefits in historical and current physical environmental settings, evaluating available data models of this impact, displaying graphically the influences of these interactions in the lives and careers of people, investigating ways that technology has changed local, national or global environments.
  3. Associate the interactions of societal decisions in science and technology innovations and discoveries, comparing how personal or community choices affect local, regional and global environments in historic, current or projected future settings, explaining the changes in society brought about by the space program, or role-playing public or personal informed decision-making about energy choices, resource availability, conservation, etc.

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