Illinois Learning Standards

Stage E - Science



Descriptors



11A —

 Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.
  1. Construct an inquiry hypothesis that can be investigated researching pertinent context, proposing the logical sequence of steps, securing the appropriate materials and equipment, or determining data-collection strategies and format for approved investigation.
  2. Conduct scientific inquiry investigation observing safety precautions and following procedural steps accurately over multiple trials.
  3. Collect qualitative and quantitative data from investigation using available technologies, determining the necessary required precision, or validating data for accuracy.
  4. Organize and display data determining most appropriate visualization strategies for collected data, or using graphs (i.e., double bar, double line, stem and leaf plots) and technologies.
  5. Analyze data to produce reasonable explanations comparing and summarizing data from multiple trials, interpreting trends, evaluating conflicting data, or determining sources of error.
  6. Communicate analysis and conclusions from investigation, interpreting graphs and charts, preparing oral, and/or written conclusions for peer review, or generating additional questions that can be tested.

11B —

Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.
  1. Identify an innovative technological design from ordinary surroundings or circumstances brainstorming common design questions (e.g., how to squeeze toothpaste better, how to fly a better paper airplane), researching background information, or suggesting the appropriate materials, equipment, data-collection strategies and success factors for approved investigation.
  2. Construct selected technological innovation sketching design, proposing the logical sequence of steps for construction, collecting appropriate materials, supplies, and safety equipment, or completing assembly of innovation.
  3. Test prototype conducting multiple trials, collecting reliable and precise data, or recording observations.
  4. Analyze data comparing and summarizing data, interpreting trends, evaluating conflicting data, or determining sources of error.
  5. Communicate design findings selecting graphs and charts that effectively report the data, preparing oral and written investigation conclusions, or generating alternative design modifications which can be tested from original investigated question.

12A —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the patterns of change and stability at the micro- and macroscopic levels of organisms (including humans), comparing the stages of simple life cycles and energy requirements, or identifying structures and their functions in cells, tissues, organs, systems and organisms (including humans).
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to distinguish the similarities and differences of offspring in organisms (including humans), comparing specific characteristics of offspring with their parents, or predicting possible genetic combinations from selected parental characteristics.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of inheritance in structural and functional features of organisms (including humans), describing genetic and environmental influences on the features of organisms, distinguishing between inherited and acquired characteristics, or explaining how cells respond to genetic and environmental influences.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of learned behavior or responses in all organisms (including humans), distinguishing characteristics as learned or inherited, or conducting simple surveys relating to learned behaviors of classmates, and/or family members.

12B  —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to categorize organisms (including humans) by their energy relationships in their environments, classifying organisms by their position in a food web, grouping organisms according to their adaptive internal and/or external features, contrasting food webs within and among different biomes, identifying the biotic and abiotic factors associated with specific habitats, or making simple inferences to the closed systems of other planets.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain competitive, adaptive and survival potential of species in different local or global ecosystems, identifying survival characteristics of organisms, explaining abiotic or biotic factors which threaten health or survival of populations or species (including humans), or identifying theories explaining mass extinctions.

12C —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore energy, demonstrating how mirrors, prisms, diffraction gratings and filters direct light patterns, diagramming how electricity can be produced from different sources of energy, explaining how electrical energy can be converted to light, heat, sound, and magnetic energy, analyzing common examples of potential and kinetic energy, or comparing insulation, conduction, convection, and radiation of heat.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to distinguish the properties of matter, separating components of mixtures by solubility, magnetic properties and densities, analyzing compound samples by quantitative methods, graphing the temperature variations associated with phase changes of simple substances, or categorizing the properties of common elements into a graphic format.

12D —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore constant, variable and periodic motion, tracing and measuring motion of vehicles (e.g., cars, bicycles, skates) in terms of position, direction, acceleration and speed in straight line, circular and inclined paths, introducing the concepts of harmonic and oscillating motion in everyday examples, or applying the concepts of natural frequency.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze actions and reactions, examining initial and final forces, manipulating simple direct and inverse proportions to forces, explaining thrust, weight, lift and drag in flight, analyzing gears and gear ratios to do work, or demonstrating Newton's Laws of Motion in terms of space flight.

12E —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze global topographic features modeling the effect of glaciation on a surface with applications to Illinois topography, or using satellite pictures, various topographic and thematic maps to indicate demographic, economic and weather patterns, and/or their interrelationships to each other.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze weather and climatic conditions, comparing historic and current precipitation, barometric, and temperature records, and trends, projecting future trends based on past and current records, or making inferences about cloud formations and weather conditions.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine long-term global, national and local renewable and nonrenewable resource supplies, explaining how historic economic choices have affected resource supplies, or focusing on comparative historic and projected water supplies and demands such as those for the local community, Illinois, the nation, and/or the world.

12F —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.
  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce concepts that explain planetary, interplanetary and stellar characteristics and cycles, generalizing the composition and features of the inner and outer planets, asteroids, comets, and different star types, applying orbital concepts for seasonal positions of constellations, applying apparent motions in the sky to use the sky as a clock, compass or calendar, explaining how the planets change their position in the sky relative to the stars over time using varying astronomic images.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce the concepts of gravitation in the solar system and beyond, identifying the general applications of gravitational forces on Earth and in near and far space examples, explaining continuous free fall in space flight, or applying solar system cycles to trajectories in space flight and research.

13A —

Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.
  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety wearing appropriate safety gear during inquiry or design investigations, demonstrating how to use a fire extinguisher, identifying safety procedures for preparation, process and conclusion of science investigations to minimize safety hazards, or recognizing potential poisonous plants or substances in classroom, outdoor or home settings, or role-playing safe reactions to safety crisis situations.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind explaining why similar investigations should but may not produce similar results, identifying circumstances which distort how variables interact, labeling accurate observations fully and carefully, or generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking.

13B —

Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.
  1. Apply scientific technologies collecting, storing, retrieving, and communicating data in classroom research and investigations, or researching the progression of technological advances in pure and applied scientific investigations and innovations.
  2. Investigate the interactions of technology in science and societal situations displaying graphically the improvements and their impact in local and global agriculture, transportation, health, sanitation, engineering, and manufacturing settings over time, or explaining different perceptions about discoveries, innovations, and trends in places, events, and regions.
  3. Investigate the interactions of societal decisions in science and technology innovations and discoveries exploring the family, local, national, or global impact of them, examining conceptual, mathematical and policy implications of energy conservation programs for classrooms, schools, homes and communities, or describing the changes in tools, careers, resource use and productivity over the centuries.

Return to Science Classroom Assessments and Performance Descriptors