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123210/12/2018
  

First public budget hearing to follow meeting in Springfield​

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. October 17. View the information packet for the meeting.​

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. October 17.  View the information packet for the meeting.

The first of three ISBE budget hearings will follow the meeting in Springfield. ISBE submits funding recommendations for pre-k through 12th-grade public education to the General Assembly and the Governor annually. The agency relies on the voices of communities to ensure its funding recommendations match the needs of all students. /p>

State Board Finance and Audit Chairman Kevin Settle will facilitate the budget hearing, which provides an opportunity for educators, advocates, and community members to communicate their requests in person. ISBE encourages all to attend. Individuals should submit their funding requests by completing the form available at www.isbe.net/budget and emailing the form to ISBEFY20@isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
100 N. First St., Springfield
October 17, 2018​
9 a.m.

Chicago Location:        ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
                                      100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location:   ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor 
                                      100 N. First St., Springfield 

AGENDA

  1. RollCall/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Presentations and Updates
    1. A. East St. Louis, Superintendent Art Culver
  4. Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: September 11-12, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
      2. Part 235 (Early Childhood)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Illinois Math and Science Partnership Grant Program
      2. Illinois Virtual Course Catalog Contract
      3. Illinois Science Assessment Technology Vendor Sole Source Contract with Breakthrough Technologies
      End of Consent Agenda
  5. ​​Waiver of School Code Mandates
  6. ​​​Cut Score Recommendations for Redeveloped Licensure Test: Foreign Language: Hebrew (245)
  7. ​​Teach Illinois Recommendations
  8. ​​Board Values
  9. ​​​KIDS Update
  10. ​​​Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  11. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  12. Information Items
    1. Fiscal & Administrative Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
  13. Adjourn​​

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net​. Click the “LISTEN IN” link that appears at the bottom of the home page at the start of the meeting.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
123110/11/2018
  

​Access to competency pilot expands to all schools

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today shared the Request for Applications for school districts to join the third cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. Accepted applicants would join 19 other school districts currently improving college and career readiness through this growing national movement.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today shared the Request for Applications for school districts to join the third cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. Accepted applicants would join 19 other school districts currently improving college and career readiness through this growing national movement.

At least 17 states, including Illinois, now have comprehensive policy alignment and/or an active state role to build capacity in local school systems for competency-based education, according to the advocacy organization iNACOL. Forty-nine states have flexibility for local school systems to shift to competency-based education. Illinois lawmakers recently amended the Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act to expand access to the pilot to all school districts serving all grades and to allow groups of school districts to join together to apply as collaboratives.

"Our pilot districts are making bold shifts to re-engage high school students in their learning," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Districts in Illinois are becoming leaders in this exciting national learning transformation. Every community should be thinking about how competency-based learning can make high school more relevant to students and employers." 

Competency-based education allows students to learn outside of the classroom and to have that learning count for credit. Students work at their own pace toward demonstrating mastery of "competencies" – specific skills and knowledge – rather than logging hours in seats. 

Gwendolyn Brooks College Preparatory Academy in Chicago Public Schools 299 joined Illinois' pilot in the first cohort in April 2017.

“Students are starting to talk about needing to demonstrate mastery," said Brooks Principal Shannae Jackson. “They'll say, 'This is exactly what I need to do. This is exactly the learning target or standard I have not demonstrated mastery in so I need to do more practice work or go into tutoring.' They can articulate those things clearly. You can hear the language change in the hallways. They're like, 'I'm going in for the retake for the formative. Have you reached mastery yet?' That's because that is the discourse happening around the building." 

Organizing learning into competencies and levels of mastery creates more transparency for students, families, and educators to understand exactly where each student is in their learning. The focus on mastery better prepares students for success in more advanced work.

“In years past, students who received a C in freshman math, for example, were then going on to fail sophomore math," says Julia Ciciora, a science, technology, engineering, and math teacher who is also the Academic Center department chair and competency-based education instructional support lead at Brooks. “My students are assessed on standards and they know what those standards are. They know what the expectations are. This last year, our big push was rubrics and being transparent with what mastery looks like."

Read more about Brooks' competency-based education program on ISBE's new Stories portal at www.isbe.net/stories.  

School districts participating in the pilot will design their own competency-based education system with support from national experts and with input from local stakeholders. The pilot provides a community of practice and knowledge-sharing around innovative performance assessments, scheduling, teacher collaboration, and technology. 

Districts may access the application, as well as a library of research and resources, at www.isbe.net/competency . Applications are due to ISBE by Dec. 7.​

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
122910/1/2018
  

​Three open hearings and #MyEduBudget social media campaign provide opportunities to voice what funding students need

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a call for public education funding requests to inform the state’s fiscal year 2020 budget.

NoNo
2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a call for public education funding requests to inform the state’s fiscal year 2020 budget. The state constitution mandates that the “primary responsibility for financing the system of public education” belongs to the state. Yet in fiscal year 2017, the state contributed approximately one-third of school districts’ revenues. ISBE advocates on behalf of students and families for fair and adequate funding. The agency relies on the voices of communities to ensure its funding recommendations match the needs of students.  

Individuals should submit their funding requests by completing the form available at www.isbe.net/budget and emailing the form to ISBEFY20@isbe.net​. State Board Finance and Audit Chairman Kevin Settle will facilitate three open budget hearings in Springfield, Mount Vernon, and Chicago to provide an opportunity for educators, advocates, and community members to communicate their requests in person. ISBE encourages all to share their stories and ideas on social media with the hashtag #MyEduBudget. 

“We encourage everyone to submit comments and to speak at the budget hearings, so we can ensure their voices are heard and represented,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The state’s budget is a manifestation of its vision. ISBE relies on stories and ideas from communities to ensure that we are in the best position to inform the General Assembly and Governor of the needs of all students in Illinois.” 

The open hearings for the fiscal year 2020 budget for public education statewide will take place in:

  • Springfield – Wednesday, Oct. 17, immediately following the Board meeting (approximately 11 a.m.) in the Board Room at ISBE (100 N. First St.)
  • Mount Vernon – Wednesday, Oct. 24, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Dr. Nick Osborne Primary Center (401 North 30th St.)
  • Chicago – Friday, Nov. 16, immediately following the Board meeting (approximately 11 a.m.) in Conference Room 16-503 at the Thompson Center (100 W. Randolph St.)

Individuals may RVSP on Facebook for each event at www.facebook.com/IllinoisStateBoardofEducation/events

“Submitting a statewide public education funding proposal to lawmakers is one of the State Board’s most important responsibilities,” said Settle. “We are most effective when we hear from diverse communities about what our schools need to take care of our students and improve outcomes for all.”

The State Board created a working draft of guiding principles for the Illinois public education fiscal year 2020 budget:

  • We believe that everyone has the right and ability to learn and that we have ethical, moral, and legal responsibilities to set high expectations and ensure that every student achieves success.
  • We believe that while racial disparities exist in virtually every key indicator of child, family, and community wellbeing and that individual, institutional, and structural impacts of race, racism, and other biases are pervasive and significantly affect key life indicators of success, these differences can change when directly addressed.
  • We believe that ending disparities and gaps in achievement begins with the delivery of quality early learning programs and appropriate parent engagement and support.
  • We believe that communities, parents, teachers, educational leaders, and community-based organizations have unique and important solutions to improve outcomes for our students.
  • We believe that teachers and leaders in every school and classroom in Illinois need to demonstrate competency in their content; their ability to adjust their pedagogy to student need; their ability to establish positive relationships with all students, including students whose background and life experience is different from theirs; and their understanding of human development.

The State Board finalizes its funding recommendations for pre-k through 12th-grade public education in January and submits them to the General Assembly and the Governor in February. Find information on past budgets at www.isbe.net/budget
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
123010/1/2018
  

​Selective annual award from U.S. Department of Education recognizes schools for academic excellence

​The U.S. Department of Education today announced the 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools, naming 24 Illinois elementary, middle, and high schools among recipients of the prestigious award. 

NoNo
2018
SPRINGFIELD – The U.S. Department of Education today announced the 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools, naming 24 Illinois elementary, middle, and high schools among recipients of the prestigious award. The diverse Illinois schools have enrollments ranging from 188 to 2,738 students. 

“Congratulations to our 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “This award gives us an opportunity to recognize educators across the state who bring our communities together and who challenge and inspire the next generation of Illinois leaders. I am deeply appreciative that so many Illinois schools are receiving this prestigious honor.”

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will honor the 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., Nov. 7-8.

Illinois’ 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools are:

  • Aviston Elementary School, Aviston (Aviston SD 21)
  • Butterfield Elementary School, Lombard (Lombard Elementary SD 44)
  • Edison Regional Gifted Center, Chicago (Chicago Public Schools SD 299)
  • Evergreen Elementary School, Carol Stream (Benjamin SD 25)
  • Giant City School, Carbondale (Giant City CCSD 130)
  • Gwendolyn Brooks College Preparatory Academy, Chicago (Chicago Public Schools 299)
  • Hickory Creek Middle School, Frankfort (Frankfort SD 157-C)
  • Hynes Elementary School, Morton Grove (Golf SD 67)
  • Libertyville High School, Libertyville (Community HSD 128)
  • Meridian School, Buffalo Grove (Aptakisic-Tripp SD 102)
  • Naperville North High School, Naperville (Naperville CUSD 203)
  • Parkview Elementary School, Columbia (Columbia CUSD 4)
  • Proviso Mathematics & Science Academy, Forest Park (Proviso Township HSD 209)
  • South Park Elementary School, Deerfield (Deerfield SD 109)
  • Tremont Grade School, Tremont (Tremont SD 702)
  • Washington Elementary School, Park Ridge (Park Ridge-Niles SD 64)
  • Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Catholic School, Orland Hills (Nonpublic)
  • Peoria Christian High School, Peoria (Nonpublic)
  • Queen Of All Saints School, Chicago (Nonpublic)
  • Sacred Heart School, Winnetka (Nonpublic)
  • St. Bede Elementary School, Ingleside (Nonpublic)
  • St. Francis de Sales School, Lake Zurich (Nonpublic)
  • St. Francis Xavier School, Wilmette (Nonpublic)
  • St. Therese Chinese Catholic School, Chicago (Nonpublic)

Photographs and brief descriptions of the 2018 National Blue Ribbon Schools are available at http://www.ed.gov/nationalblueribbonschools​

The U.S. Department of Education began the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program in 1982 to bring public attention to exemplary schools in the United States and to facilitate communication and the sharing of best practices within and among schools. The coveted award affirms the hard work of educators, families, and communities in creating safe and welcoming schools where students master challenging and engaging content. 
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12289/13/2018
  
Media call at 3:30 p.m. today to address “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms” report

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will host a media call at 3:30 p.m. today with State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., to address ISBE's recently published comprehensive suite of solutions for the statewide teacher workforce crisis. The “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms" report addresses the state's record number of unfilled positions with solutions backed by state and national research and data. 

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD –The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will host a media call at 3:30 p.m. today with State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., to address ISBE's recently published comprehensive suite of solutions for the statewide teacher workforce crisis. The “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms" report addresses the state's record number of unfilled positions with solutions backed by state and national research and data.

​The data show the problem strikes underfunded districts: 90 percent of last year's teacher vacancies were in districts funded below adequacy. The report is available at www.isbe.net/teachillinois and is open for public comment until Oct. 2. Commenters can submit feedback to TeachIllinois@isbe.net. ISBE will produce specific next steps and policy recommendations based on the report in October.


Assessment & AccountabilityBILDILLI LORI
12269/10/2018
  

​Students to meet for the first time at Governor’s Mansion tonight

​Twenty high school students from across Illinois will meet for the first time as the State Board's Student Advisory Council for the 2018-19 school year. The teens will convene tonight at the newly renovated Illinois Governor's Mansion in Springfield. The council provides diverse student perspectives on Illinois education issues and has a front-row seat to observe how the State Board formulates policy.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – Twenty high school students from across Illinois will meet for the first time as the State Board's Student Advisory Council for the 2018-19 school year. The teens will convene tonight at the newly renovated Illinois Governor's Mansion in Springfield. The council provides diverse student perspectives on Illinois education issues and has a front-row seat to observe how the State Board formulates policy.

The council will research and present to the State Board on topics affecting students' success in Illinois. The students' interests and the agency's priorities and needs over the course of the year will drive the council's research topics. Additionally, the council will continue to develop the Student Voices microsite at www.isbe.net/studentvoices, launched by the 2017-18 Student Advisory Council this past spring. The Student Voices site provides space for students to ask and answer questions and access resources about preparing for college and career. 

“Every year I am more and more impressed with the creativity and dedication the Student Advisory Council brings to the State Board," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “I admire these young people for taking the initiative to help shape Illinois' education system to benefit their peers and communities. I look forward to getting to know this year's council members and hearing their ideas."

The council will meet with Smith Tuesday morning and be introduced to the members of the State Board during the Board's public annual planning retreat Tuesday afternoon.

“We are one of the few states and few state agencies with a Student Advisory Council," said State Board of Education Chairman James T. Meeks. “This year we are creating even greater opportunities for these students to contribute and for us to learn from each other."

The 2018-19 Student Advisory Council includes 13 new members and seven returning members. The new members of this year's council are:

  • Faith Drescher, a sophomore at Hinsdale Central High School in Hinsdale
  • Joyce Coleman, a senior at North Chicago Community High School in North Chicago
  • Domenica Ferdinardo, a junior at Ridgewood Community High School in Norridge
  • Anna Foster, a sophomore at PORTA High School in Petersburg
  • Dylan Hu, a junior at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire
  • Corlin Leonard, a senior at Victor J. Andrew High School in Orland Hills
  • Anna Oettinger, a senior at Deerfield High School in Deerfield
  • Zaporah Price, a senior at Gwendolyn Brooks College Preparatory Academy in Chicago
  • Z'Sanique Sanders, a sophomore at East St. Louis Senior High School in East St. Louis
  • Carter Shockey, a junior at Freeport High School in Freeport
  • Joshua Slavin, a senior at Yorkville High School in Yorkville
  • Weirui (Nicole) Tong, a junior at Naperville North High School in Naperville
  • Christiana Wang, a senior at Normal Community High School in Normal

The returning members of this year's council are:

  • Neha Arun, a senior at Carterville High School in Carterville
  • Emma Gatz, a junior at Metea Valley High School in Aurora​
  • Bryce Massey, a senior at Anna-Jonesboro High School in Anna
  • Gatlin Miller, a senior at Mount Vernon Township High School in Mount Vernon
  • FanXuan (Carina) Peng, a senior at Northside College Preparatory Academy in Chicago
  • Levi Siebers, a junior at Liberty High School in Liberty
  • Abbigail Thurman, a junior at Rochester High School in Rochester

In previous years, the council has examined topics ranging from school safety and cyberbullying to grading scales and mental health.

The State Board selected the members of the 2018-19 council from more than 100 applications. The students exhibited strong interpersonal skills; the ability to work well in groups, think creatively, and come up with innovative solutions to policy challenges; and an interest in public service.​

ISBE will make applications for the 2019-20 council available in the spring of 2019.

​The State Board established the council in 1975. Learn more at www.isbe.net/studentadvisory.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12279/10/2018
  

​Growing competency-based movement drives innovation in college and career preparation

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced that four school districts are joining the state’s Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program: Illinois Valley Central School District 321 in Peoria County, Mattoon Community Unit School District 2, Quincy School District 172, and Warren Community Unit School District 205.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced that four school districts are joining the state's Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program: Illinois Valley Central School District 321 in Peoria County, Mattoon Community Unit School District 2, Quincy School District 172, and Warren Community Unit School District 205.

The districts join the pilot on the heels of the federal Strengthening Career and Technical Education (CTE) for the 21st Century Act, which emphasizes workplace-based learning, incentivizes community and employer partnerships, and expands CTE opportunities to middle grades. The growing competency-based movement in Illinois, fueled by advances in CTE, is modernizing traditional structures of education to engage all students in college and career success.

“Competency-based education is the future of college and career preparation, and Illinois intends to be a leader," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The reauthorization of the CTE Act occurs as we transform college and career readiness in Illinois. CTE creates opportunities for students to explore careers, while building academic knowledge and transferrable skills. Competency-based systems allow all of that learning to count."

Many districts across the state are implementing competency-based practices. The state's pilot offers school districts a unique opportunity to receive coaching from national experts and to build a community of practice with other districts. Districts share and learn about innovations in scheduling, teacher collaboration, technology, curriculum, credits, partnerships, and performance assessments.

Students in competency-based systems demonstrate mastery of skills and concepts in order to advance. Competency-based systems personalize education to the student, allowing the student's own interests, goals, and pace to dictate the structure. Students learn outside and inside of the classroom, developing skills and knowledge through apprenticeships, internships, and community service, as well as the classroom.

Pilot districts use the principles of competency-based education to design their own unique systems with input from local stakeholders.

The four school districts announced today bring the total number of participating districts to 19. The school districts in the pilot span the state, from urban, to suburban, to rural.

ISBE launched the pilot to spur innovation in the way high schools prepare students for meaningful careers and to support Illinois' goal of 60 percent of Illinoisans having a high-quality degree or credential by 2025. The pilot is one of four strategies enacted by the Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act, which was unanimously passed by both legislative chambers and signed into law by Governor Bruce Rauner.

​The application for the next cohort will open in October 2018. Learn more about the pilot and see a map of participating districts at https://www.isbe.net/competency.


External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12249/7/2018
  

​Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms” report addresses record number of unfilled positions, concentrated in underfunded school districts

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today published a comprehensive suite of solutions for the statewide teacher workforce crisis, backed by state and national research and data. The “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms” report addresses the state’s record number of unfilled positions. The data show the problem strikes underfunded districts: 90 percent of last year’s teacher vacancies were in districts funded below adequacy. Fully investing in the Evidence-Based Funding formula will support school districts in the greatest need to implement proven models for improving teacher recruitment and retention.

NoNo
2018

​SPRINGFIELD –The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today published a comprehensive suite of solutions for the statewide teacher workforce crisis, backed by state and national research and data. The “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms" report addresses the state's record number of unfilled positions. The data show the problem strikes underfunded districts: 90 percent of last year's teacher vacancies were in districts funded below adequacy. Fully investing in the Evidence-Based Funding formula will support school districts in the greatest need to implement proven models for improving teacher recruitment and retention.

State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., will facilitate a discussion on the report with State Board members at the ISBE board meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 11. The board meeting begins at noon at 100 N. First St. in Springfield. Additionally, ISBE will host a media call with Smith at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13 at (800) 230-1092.

“Every child in Illinois deserves well prepared and effective teachers in their classrooms," said Smith. “The State Board charged agency staff one year ago with thoroughly investigating the teacher shortage in Illinois. We have a statewide crisis, and now we have a suite of research-backed and targeted solutions. Getting serious about solving the teacher shortage crisis means increasing investments in Illinois' underfunded school districts, so they can implement proven teacher leadership, mentorship, and pipeline models."

The Teach Illinois report connects and prioritizes recommendations based on national and state research studies and engagement with focus groups involving more than 400 participants across the state.

The Teach Illinois recommendations fall into six strategies:

  1. Provide adequate funding for all school districts. Ninety percent of the 2017 teaching vacancies were in districts funded below adequacy. The districts in the greatest need currently have the fewest resources to implement effective teacher leadership, mentorship, and pipeline programs. The report recommends fully funding the Evidence-Based Funding formula.
  2. Create leadership and mentorship structures for current teachers. Nationally, new teachers who do not receive mentoring and other supports leave at more than twice the rate of those who do. The biggest supply of teachers for Illinois' classrooms is returning educators, whose return rate typically hovers at about 90 percent. However, 54 percent of new teachers in Illinois leave their initial school of employment within the first two years. By the fifth year of teaching, 67 percent leave their initial school of employment, and 25-30 percent leave the teaching profession altogether. Chicago Public Schools' Opportunity Culture schools and Tennessee's Teacher Leader Network provide effective models for teacher leadership that not only increase retention but also expand the reach of master teachers and improve student achievement.
  3. Support innovation in teacher preparation. The number of candidates enrolling in and completing teacher preparation programs in Illinois decreased by 53 percent between 2010 and 2016. Teach Illinois focus group participants resoundingly agreed that a high-quality field experience is the single best way for teacher candidates to develop effective content, classroom management, and data-driven decision-making practices. The report recommends supporting multiple avenues of entry into the teaching profession and encourages partnerships between school districts and preparation programs.
  4. Develop teacher career pipelines aligned to meet demand. Bilingual and special education account for almost half of all unfilled positions. Additionally, the percentage of students of color in Illinois increased from 46 percent to 52 percent over the last ten years, while the percentage of teachers of color remained static at around 15 percent. The report recommends developing pipelines to provide a seamless pathway from introductory dual-credit courses in high school, into postsecondary preparation, through to licensure – especially in shortage areas such as bilingual and special education. District 214's Educator Prep Career Pathways, Kansas City Public Schools' Educators Rising program, and the Portland Dual Language Teacher Fellows Program provide models for teacher pathways.
  5. Eliminate the Test of Academic Proficiency and explore alternative approaches to assessing basic skills. Currently, most teacher candidates opt to demonstrate the basic skills necessary for licensure through ACT or SAT. Portfolio or competency-based assessments could provide more effective options, while maintaining rigorous standards and high expectations.
  6. Partner with stakeholders on a statewide communications and community outreach campaign. Illinois can learn from the public awareness campaigns undertaken by other states and reach target audiences through grassroots and communications efforts.

The report is available online at www.isbe.net/teachillinois and is open for public comment until Oct. 2. Commenters can submit feedback to TeachIllinois@isbe.net.

The Joyce Foundation generously invested in the Teach Illinois project and served as a thought partner. The foundation also supported Education First Consulting and Revolution Impact, which provided technical and content expertise.​

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12259/7/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its annual planning retreat Sept. 11 and 12 in Springfield. The retreat is open to the public. Public participation will occur on Sept. 12 at approximately noon. 

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its annual planning retreat Sept. 11 and 12 in Springfield. The retreat is open to the public. Public participation will occur on Sept. 12 at approximately noon.

View the information packet for the meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net. Locate the “Listen In" link at the bottom of the home page when the meeting begins.

State Board of Education Meeting
100 N. First St., Springfield
September 11, 2018​
Noon

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Welcome and Agenda Review​​
  3. ​Student Advisory Council
  4. ​​Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms
  5. Evidence-Based Funding Formula Review and Status Update

​September 12, 2018​
8:30 a.m.

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. ​​Welcome and Celebrations
  3. Whole Child, Whole School, Whole Community
  4. Fiscal Year 2020 Budget Planning Discussion
  5. Public Participation (Approximately Noon)
  6. Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: August 8, 2018
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 227 (Gifted Education)
    4. *Contracts and Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Request for Sealed Proposal – Illinois ePlan
      2. Healthy Community Investment Grants
    5. *Fall 2018 Waiver Report
      End of Consent Agenda
  7. 2019 Legislative Agenda
  8. 2018 Preliminary State-Level Assessment Results
  9. Closed Session (As Needed)
  10. Semi-Annual Review of Closed Session Minutes
  11. ​Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  12. Information Items​
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​​​
  13. ​Closing Reflections
  14. Adjourn​


External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12239/5/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the eligibility guidelines for students to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The policy took effect at the start of the 2019 fiscal year on July 1, 2018. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets the policy for each fiscal year to reflect any changes in the federal poverty guidelines.​

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the eligibility guidelines for students to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The policy took effect at th​​e ​start of the 2019 fiscal year on July 1, 2018. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets the policy for each fiscal year to reflect any changes in the federal poverty guidelines.

The National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program are funded by USDA and administered by ISBE. Free and reduced-price meals ensure access to nutritious meals and snacks for families unable to pay the full price.

“Good nutrition is essential to children's readiness to learn," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The only meals many of our students get are at school. Illinois' agricultural assets give us an amazing opportunity to feed students high-quality, healthy foods. ISBE is very proud to administer school nutrition programs in Illinois."

The following chart lists the household size and income criteria that determine students' eligibility to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. View the USDA's Fiscal Year 2019 Income Eligibility Guidelines ​on the ISBE's website​.

​​​

Income Eligibility Guidelines
Effective from July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019

Free Meals
130% Federal Poverty Guideline

Household SizeAnnualMonthlyTwice Per Month​​Every Two WeeksWeekly
115,782 1,316 658 607 304
221,398 1,784 892 823 412
327,014 2,252​ 1,126 1,039 520
432,630 2,720 1,360 1,255 628
5​
38,246 3,188 1,594 1,471 736
643,862 3,656 1,828 1,687 844
749,478 4,124 2,062 1,903 952
855,094 4,592 2,296 2,119 1,060
For each additional family member, add5,616 468 234 216 108

Reduced-Price Meals
185% Federal Poverty Guideline

​ ​ ​
Household SizeAnnualMonthlyTwice Per MonthEvery Two Weeks​​​​Weekly
122,459 1,872 936 864 432
230,451 2,538 1,269 1,172 586
338,443 3,204 1,602 1,479 740
446,435 3,870 1,935 1,786 893
554,427 4,536 2,268 2,094 1,047
662,419 5,202 2,601 2,401 1,201
770,411 5,868 2,934 2,709 1,355
878,403 6,534 3,267 3,016 1,508
​For each additional family member, add7,992 666 333 308 154​

USDA provided the following information for families and guardians seeking free or reduced-price meals for students:

Children from households that meet federal guidelines are eligible for free or reduced-price meal services. Complete one application per household for all children who ​attend the same school district.

All meals served must meet USDA meal requirements. However, a school can make substitutions prescribed by a doctor if a child has been determined by the doctor to have a disability that would prevent the child from eating the regular school meal. There will be no extra charge if a substitute meal is needed. Please contact the school for more information if you believe your child needs substitutions because of a disability.

Letters, along with application forms, are being sent to parents or guardians. Households must complete the application as soon as possible, sign it, and return it to the school to apply for free or reduced-price meal services. Additional copies of the application form are available in the principal's office in each school. Households should answer all applicable questions on the form. An application that does not contain all the required information cannot be processed and approved by the school. Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants may be eligible for free/reduced-price meals and are encouraged to complete an application for meal benefits.

The required information is as follows:

​SNAP/TANF HOUSEHOLDS: You do not have to complete this application to receive free meal benefits if the school provided you a letter that stated your child(ren) is eligible for free meals via the direct certification process. Households that currently receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for their child(ren) only have to list the child(ren)'s name and at least one SNAP or TANF case number and sign the application. All children listed on the application are categorically eligible for free meals if at least one SNAP/TANF case number for any household member is provided. Applications listing LINK card numbers cannot be used for free or reduced-price meals.

ALL OTHER HOUSEHOLDS: Children are eligible for either free or reduced-price meal services if a household's income is at or below the level shown on the income scale. Households must provide the following information:

  • The names of all household members;
  • The last four digits of the Social Security number of the adult household member signing the application, or indicate if the adult does not have a Social Security number;
  • The amount of income each household member received last month, how frequently it is paid, and where it came from (wages, child support, etc.); and
  • The signature of an adult household member.

The information on the application may be checked by school or other officials at any time during the school year. Households may apply for benefits at any time during the school year. Households that are not eligible now but have a decrease in household income, an increase in household size, or that have a household member become unemployed should fill out an application at that time. Children in temporary living situations, including homeless, migrant, and runaway youth and youth in foster care, and children participating in Head Start are categorically eligible for free meals. ​Please follow instructions and return form to school. Households that do not agree with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss it with the school. Households also have the right to a fair hearing.

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement

In accordance with federal civil rights law and USDA civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA; its agencies, offices, and employees; and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. 

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) online or at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. Fax:   (202) 690-7442; or
  3. Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.​​

Assessment & AccountabilityUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12228/27/2018
  

​State Superintendent to name 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year Oct. 20

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the 10 finalists for the 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year. 

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the 10 finalists for the 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year. The nominees transcend heroism: a social studies teacher who redefines who “belongs” in Advanced Placement history; a poetry teacher who shows students the world, figuratively and literally; a special education teacher whose students operate the most popular coffee shop on the block. ISBE will name one individual from the 10 finalists as the 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year during the Those Who Excel banquet in October. 

“Our Teacher of the Year finalists are heroes,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “They represent the best in the profession and the very best of Illinois. These educators make each student feel known and cared for. At a time when some would harden our schools, these educators build the relationships that make our communities whole and strong.” 
 
A selection committee composed of administrators, teachers, educational service personnel, student support personnel, and past Illinois Teacher of the Year winners reviewed 214 Teacher of the Year nominations this year. The state’s annual educator recognition banquet and program acknowledges the contributions and accomplishments of more than 200 extraordinary educators and school personnel from throughout the state. 

Lindsey Jensen represented Illinois as the state’s 2018 Teacher of the Year. Jensen teaches English at Dwight High School in Dwight Public Schools District 230. 

"The Illinois Teacher of the Year is gifted with an incredible platform to advocate for teachers, students, and equity,” Jensen said. “It has been my great honor to fiercely and unapologetically advocate for education in Illinois." 

ISBE will announce the 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year during the Those Who Excel banquet on Saturday, Oct. 20, at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center in Normal. The Teacher of the Year will represent Illinois at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., and in the Council of Chief State School Officers’ National Teacher of the Year Program.

The 2019 Illinois Teacher of the Year finalists are listed below. ISBE will highlight one finalist per week in the Superintendent’s Weekly Message leading up to the banquet in October.

Lindsay Adams teaches chemistry, physics, forensic science, and unified science at Gallatin County High School, located in Junction, in Gallatin County Community Unit District 7.

Roger Baldwin teaches chemistry, physics, physical science, and theater/drama at Clinton High School, located in Clinton, in Clinton Community Unit School District 15.

Susan Converse is a special education teacher at Edwardsville High School, located in Edwardsville, in Edwardsville Community Unit School District 7.

Richard “Rick” Coppola teaches language arts at South Loop Elementary School, located in Chicago, in Chicago Public Schools 299.

LoriAnne Frieri, Ed.D., is a social studies teacher at William Fremd High School, located in Palatine, in Township High School District 211.

Stephanie Lerch teaches fifth-grade math and science at Red Bud Elementary School, located in Red Bud, in Red Bud Community Unit School District 132.

Benjamin Luginbuhl is a vocal music/chorus teacher who also teaches AP music theory and American popular music at Normal Community High School, located in Normal, in McLean County Unit School District 5.

Sara Magnafichi teaches first grade at Admiral Byrd Elementary School, located in Elk Grove, in Community Consolidated School District 59.

William “Bill” Polasky is a social studies teacher in grades 9-12 at Stillman Valley High School, located in Stillman Valley, in Meridian Community Unit School District 223.  

Katherine Whitington, Ph.D., teaches English, dual-credit philosophy, Advanced Placement English literature, and composition at Percy L. Julian High School, located in Chicago, in Chicago Public Schools 299.

For photos and more information about the finalists, please contact the ISBE Office of Communications at (217) 782-4648.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12218/13/2018
  

Kindergarten Individual Development Survey provides critical data to improve early learning supports for all children

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the first-ever statewide snapshot of kindergarten readiness in Illinois. The data cap off the first year of the state’s bold effort to collect readiness data for all kindergartners in the state. The Kindergarten Individual Development Survey (KIDS) puts critical information about children’s early development into the hands of policymakers, schools, and communities. 

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the first-ever statewide snapshot of kindergarten readiness in Illinois. The data cap off the first year of the state’s bold effort to collect readiness data for all kindergartners in the state. The Kindergarten Individual Development Survey (KIDS) puts critical information about children’s early development into the hands of policymakers, schools, and communities. 

The data reinforce the importance of high-quality early learning experiences for all children to get a strong start. The data give communities a powerful tool for advocacy and empower the state to increase investments in our early learners. Current KIDS data, when considered with data on Free and Reduced-Price Lunch eligibility, suggest that students not receiving free or reduced-price lunch in general demonstrate higher readiness when entering kindergarten. ISBE will analyze additional indicators for possible trends or patterns in subsequent years.

“Illinois’ kindergarten teachers and school and district leaders have shown extraordinary leadership in making the first year of KIDS data collection a success,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The data give families, teachers, and communities a powerful tool to advocate for the resources and supports all children need. We all have an urgent opportunity and responsibility to align state policy and investments with what children need for long-term academic and social success.”

What is KIDS?

Teachers use the KIDS instrument to observe and document students’ skills, knowledge, and behaviors on 14 required measures in three developmental areas that are key to long-term success: social-emotional development, language and literacy, and math. Teachers observe students’ strengths in the first 40 days of instruction as they go about their daily routines – such as playing, schoolwork, conversations, and following directions – with no interruption to regular classroom activity. School districts have the option of using the tool again in the winter and spring to track students’ developmental progress and of collecting up to 55 measures for a richer, fuller picture of individual development. 

ISBE developed KIDS in partnership with a committee of experts; advocates; and practitioners, including representatives from the WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies and the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley. The Robert R. McCormick Foundation and the Joyce Foundation have provided significant support throughout development and implementation. 

Statewide implementation in 2017 followed five years of piloting with select districts that engaged more than 50,000 children.

What does KIDS data show?

KIDS provides a measure of children’s development upon entering kindergarten. Children enter kindergarten with a wide range of prior child care and education experiences, including in-home care, child care centers, family care, Head Start, pre-kindergarten, and privately run programs. 

The results of KIDS do not reflect the work taking place in schools prior to or after KIDS data collection. Children’s experiences prior to kindergarten do not reflect district or school performance. 

KIDS entails teachers using a new observational tool and entering data into a new platform. Most school districts implemented KIDS for the first time in 2017, the first year of required statewide implementation. 

ISBE will continue to provide training to ensure consistent observation approaches, data input, and reporting protocols as KIDS implementation moves into year two. KIDS coaches, available at no cost to all districts, provide ongoing professional learning opportunities in support of teachers as they learn and refine their observational skills.

View the statewide data summary at www.isbe.net/kids

What does KIDS mean for families?

Kindergarten is a critical milestone in a child’s long-term educational trajectory. Research shows that children with higher levels of school readiness at age 5 are generally more successful in grade school, are less likely to drop out of high school, and even earn more as adults.

Parents, guardians, and families are essential for children’s healthy development. Research has explored and described the conditions children need to thrive, such as opportunities for imaginative play, being read to, and describing the world around them. Families can visit www.isbe.net/Pages/KIDS_Parents_Families.aspx​ to see activities to support their children’s learning before they start school.

Teachers also can use KIDS to inform conversations with parents and caregivers about students’ developmental needs and supporting learning outside of school. Kindergarten teachers have access to their students’ data year-round in the KIDStech platform. 
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Families & StudentsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12208/3/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. August 8.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. August 8.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
August 8, 2018​
9:00 a.m.

​Chicago Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor, 100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

​Springfield Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor, 100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: June 13, 2018
    2. *Rules for Approval
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
      2. ​Part 130 (Special Education per Capita Tuition Charge)
    3. *Contracts and Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Request for Sealed Proposal – Information Systems – SharePoint Software Developers
      2. Request for Sealed Proposal – Information Systems – Data Warehouse Data Analysts
    4. ​*Election of Illinois Voting Delegate for National Association of State Boards of Education Annual Conference and Business Meeting 2018
      End of Consent Agenda
    5. Illinois State Educator Preparation and Licensure Board Appointments
    6. Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice Board of Education Appointments
  4. ​​Discussion Items
    1. Legislative Update
    2. Budget Update
    3. Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    4. Other Items for Discussion​
  5. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  6. ​Closed Session (as needed)
  7. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  8. Adjourn​
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12196/29/2018
  

Nearly half a million children in Illinois are food insecure​

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the availability of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) for fiscal year 2019. CACFP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by ISBE as part of a suite of programs to provide children and families access to healthy meals. 

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2018
SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the availability of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) for fiscal year 2019. CACFP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by ISBE as part of a suite of programs to provide children and families access to healthy meals. 

CACFP assists child care centers, Head Start programs, before- and after-school programs, emergency shelters, and day care home providers with funding to provide nutritious meals to children in their care. All participating child care centers and day care homes must provide meals to enrolled children at no additional charge.

“The Child and Adult Care Food Program ensures children in day care and after-school programs who may not otherwise have regular access to healthy food are getting the proper nutrition they need to fuel their developing bodies and brains,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “More than one in 10 people in Illinois, a third of them children, are food insecure. Physical health and nutrition affect our ability to learn, focus, and grow. ISBE is proud to administer nutrition programs that help ensure all children have what they need to thrive.” 

In 2016, more than 1.4 million people in Illinois were food insecure, including nearly half a million children, according to Feeding America .

Individuals in households who participate in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are automatically eligible to receive free meal benefits. The USDA Household Income Eligibility Guidelines determine eligibility to receive free meal benefits for families that do not receive TANF or SNAP benefits. If a household’s income falls within or below the listed guidelines, they should contact their child care center or day care home provider to learn about benefits of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. They may be required to complete an application and provide income, TANF, or SNAP information.

Children enrolled in Head Start or Early Head Start programs at approved Head Start facilities and foster care children who are legal responsibilities of the state or court also receive free meal benefits. Parents or guardians should contact their child care center or day care home provider to find out if they participate in CACFP.

Income Eligibility Guidelines Effective from July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019

​​
Free Meals
130% Federal Poverty Guideline

​Household SizeAnnualMonthlyTwice Per MonthEvery Two WeeksWeekly
Household SizeAnnual
115,7821,316658607304122,459
221,3981,784892823412230,451
327,0142,2521,1261,039520338,443
432,6302,7201,3601,255628446,435
538,2463,1881,5941,471736554,427
643,8623,6561,8281,687844662,419
749,4784,1242,0621,903952770,411
855,0944,5922,2962,1191,060878,403
For each additional family member, add5,616468234
216108For each additional family member, add7,992

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement
In accordance with federal civil rights law and USDA civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA; its agencies, offices, and employees; and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) found at https://www.ascr.usda.gov/how-file-program-discrimination-complaint and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. 
Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:
  1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. Fax:   (202) 690-7442; or
  3. Email: program.intake@usda.gov .
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12186/27/2018
  

​Monitor and district will implement corrective actions approved by State Board​

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the appointment of Laura Boedeker as monitor to work with Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to improve its special education services to students. The monitor and CPS will work in partnership to implement the transformative corrective actions approved by ISBE in May. Boedeker begins her role July 2.

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the appointment of Laura Boedeker as monitor to work with Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to improve its special education services to students. The monitor and CPS will work in partnership to implement the transformative corrective actions approved by ISBE in May. Boedeker begins her role July 2. 

ISBE will increase its support and technical assistance for CPS also through the hiring of three additional staff dedicated to fulfilling ISBE’s responsibilities as the Regional Office of Education for the district.   

“All children deserve to receive the individual supports they need to thrive,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The appointment of the CPS monitor marks a critical moment in our collective work to meet the needs of all children and families in Chicago. Laura has exactly the skills and capacities to shepherd the district’s special education program on the path to transformation. We look forward to partnering with CPS to create sustained, positive change and ensure that all children and families in the district are fully served.” 

Boedeker will serve as the liaison for special education between ISBE and CPS. CPS must seek approval from the monitor prior to changing or adopting policies and procedures regarding special education. Boedeker will review the district’s special education budget and help the district develop a plan to identify and individually support students impacted by the harmful policies. 

ISBE employs and pays the salary for the monitor. ISBE will evaluate the continued necessity of the monitor after three school years.  

“We are at a critical crossroads regarding our diverse learners in Chicago,” said Boedeker. “We need genuine collaboration to facilitate groundbreaking changes and improvements in our practices regarding special education. I am honored to lead this work in collaboration with students, families, CPS, the Chicago Teachers Union, and special education advocates.”

Boedeker comes to ISBE with extensive experience practicing school law with a focus on special education. Her work experience includes serving Chicago Public Schools as in-house counsel, social-emotional learning specialist, and senior diverse learner support leader. She also worked as an Assistant State’s Attorney for Cook County and an Intelligence Analyst for the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington D.C. Boedeker served most recently as an attorney in the students and special education practice group of Hodges, Loizzi, Eisenhammer, Rodick & Kohn LLP. 

ISBE initiated the state’s first-ever Public Inquiry after receiving complaints from parents and advocates about systemic problems in CPS’s delivery of special education services. The Public Inquiry facilitated a fair and transparent fact-finding process, gathering substantial and detailed evidence from many sources. The State Board found that specific CPS policies and practices violated the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which protects students’ right to a free and appropriate public education. The final report contained 43 findings of fact upon which ISBE based its findings of law and corrective actions. 

ISBE will continue to post updates on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry .
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12176/25/2018
  

Panel will make recommendations to continue improving fairness of state’s school funding formula

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will convene the Evidence-Based Funding Professional Review Panel in the ISBE Board Room at 100 N. First St. in Springfield at 11 a.m. June 26. The panel of practitioners, experts, legislative leaders, and advocates will review the first year of the state’s historic funding reform implementation, as mandated by Public Act 100-0465.

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will convene the Evidence-Based Funding Professional Review Panel in the ISBE Board Room at 100 N. First St. in Springfield at 11 a.m. June 26. The panel of practitioners, experts, legislative leaders, and advocates will review the first year of the state’s historic funding reform implementation, as mandated by Public Act 100-0465

The panel will meet on a periodic basis to study specific aspects of the formula. The panel will recommend modifications in the future to continue improving school funding to meet the needs of all students in Illinois. All panel meetings will be open to the public and will include an opportunity for public comment. ISBE encourages members of the public to attend and participate. 

“School funding reform was a landmark advancement for fairness in Illinois,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The Professional Review Panel is a very important part of our continuing work to tune Evidence-Based Funding to meet the needs of children, families, and communities across the state. Bringing diverse voices to the table will help us identify necessary improvements. We encourage and value public participation to ensure the funding system serves all students.”

The panel will study topics including the format and scope of school districts’ annual spending plans; the “at-risk student” definition; funding for Regional Safe Schools, early childhood education, and other specific investments; and other aspects of the formula. The panel will make recommendations to the State Board, the General Assembly, and the Governor for continual recalibration of the landmark funding system. 

The panel consists of 28 members appointed by Smith, Governor Bruce Rauner, and legislative leaders. Panel membership reflects the geographic, socio-economic, racial, and ethnic diversity of the state, including representatives with expertise in bilingual education and special education.

Find a list of members and more information about the Professional Review Panel on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/prp.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12166/19/2018
  

State Board, Illinois Education Association, and Illinois Federation of Teachers honor outstanding teachers, librarians, and health professionals from across the state


​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today joined the Illinois Federation of Teachers (IFT) and the Illinois Education Association (IEA) to honor 59 educators whose professional organizations selected them as the best in their fields during the 2017-18 school year. The eighth annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Award Luncheon held in Normal honored education professionals in diverse disciplines from world language instructors and nutrition experts to the Dance Teacher of the Year.​

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2018

NORMAL – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today joined the Illinois Federation of Teachers (IFT) and the Illinois Education Association (IEA) to honor 59 educators whose professional organizations selected them as the best in their fields during the 2017-18 school year. The eighth annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Award Luncheon held in Normal honored education professionals in diverse disciplines from world language instructors and nutrition experts to the Dance Teacher of the Year.

“Educators help students imagine and aspire to futures they would not otherwise think possible," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Teachers, health professionals, librarians, coaches, and other caring adults make our schools places of belonging for all students. Educators see the possibilities in young people before they can even see them in themselves. I express deep thankfulness for the educators across the state who make a strong social, economic, and civic future possible for all our communities."

ISBE and the two state teacher associations co-hosted this year's luncheon at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center.

“The Illinois Federation of Teachers proudly sponsors the Teacher Recognition luncheon each year to honor the dedication and innovation of our outstanding educators," said IFT President Dan Montgomery, a veteran English teacher. “We have world-class teachers in Illinois and it brings us great joy to take the time to celebrate the best in the state."

ISBE names a Teacher of the Year and recognizes more than 200 educators nominated by their communities as part of the Those Who Excel program each fall. The annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Award Luncheon provides an opportunity to honor other award-winning education professionals from across the state.

“The Illinois Education Association is always proud to help sponsor the Teacher Recognition Luncheon, a wonderful way to thank and acknowledge Illinois' many outstanding educators," said IEA President Kathi Griffin. “The award winners have shown exemplary teaching in each of their fields, and they remind us that great education is being delivered to our students every day in every school in Illinois."

ISBE, IEA, and IFT recognized the following exemplary educators today:

EducatorRecognitionOrganizationSchool
Shayna AdelmanNew Teacher of the Year
Technology Education AssociationJames B. Conant High School
Janice AmannExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonMascoutah Elementary
Emily AuffenbergExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonJoseph Arthur Middle School
Angie BarnettExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonParkview Elementary School
Gretchen BrinzaIL STEM Educator of the YearETA hand2mindAlcott Elementary School
Lisa BoundsClarissa Hug Teacher of the YearIllinois Council for Exceptional ChildrenPrairie Central Junior High School
Candace CavenyExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonO'Fallon Township High School
Ginger CramseyExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonLewis & Clark Elementary School
Phillip CrewsTeacher of the YearIllinois Music Education AssociationRich Central High School
Julie DaabExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonNew Athens Junior High School
Zandra Davis-JoshuaExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonGordon Bush Elementary School
Ellen EricsonDistinguished Service Award for Exemplary TeachingIllinois Council on the Teaching of Foreign LanguagesMahomet-Seymour High School
Doug FalkExcellence in Teaching AwardIllinois Association of Vocational AgricultureCuba High School
Mark FoellmerMiddle School P.E. Teacher of the YearIllinois Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and DanceWentworth Junior High School
Stephanie FergusonExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonSignal Hill School
Jean HasenstabExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonWhiteside Middle School
Mike HavenerRuth Toor Grant for Strong Public LibrariesAmerican Association of School LibrariansSpringfield High School
Jim Hitchcock18th District Citizenship Education Teacher of the YearIllinois Veterans of Foreign WarsCoal City Middle School
Mike JonesIllinois STEM Educator of the YearETA hand2mindBloomington Junior High School
Sarah JonesExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonEast Alton Wood River High School
Wendy KassingExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonShiloh Middle School
Tami KelleyPromising New Teacher AwardIllinois Council of Teachers of MathematicsRock Island-Milan School District 41
Julia KesselOutstanding Chinese Teacher of the YearIllinois Council on the Teaching of Foreign LanguagesNew Trier High School
Joyce Kim2017 Claes Nobel Educator of the YearNational Society of High School ScholarsProspect High School
Angie KuchnickiExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonLovejoy Elementary School
Sheila LairdExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonHighland Primary School
Lydia LathamExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonMarissa Junior and Senior High School
Stacy McQueenTeacher of the Year in the Classroom ProgramSangamon and Morgan County Farm BureauVirginia Elementary School
Jennifer MailanderAward for New Teacher of Foreign LanguageIllinois Council on the Teaching of Foreign LanguagesUplift Community High School
Lyndsey MehrtensExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonWilliam Holliday Elementary School
Carrie MetzeExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonTriad High School
Cindy MeyerExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonMillstadt Consolidated School
Karen MonhardtMary Hoffman AwardIllinois Music Education AssociationBloomington High School
Rebecca NelsonFinalist for 2017 Claes Nobel Educator of the YearNational Society of High School ScholarsOswego East High School
Darcy O'Connor2018 Educator of the YearIllinois Computing EducatorsNew Holland-Middletown Elementary School
Keith  PadgettExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonBelleville East High School
Kirsten Perry2018 School Counselor of the Year, National and StateAmerican School Counselor AssociationLawndale Community Academy
James RobertoYoung Professional Teacher of the YearIllinois Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and DancePortage Park Elementary School
Lisa RobertsonPamela J. Farris Rural Classroom Library AwardIllinois Reading CouncilLake Crest Elementary School
Sheila Ruh2018 Educator of the YearIllinois Computing EducatorsWestmont Junior High School
Spencer SaalExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonMadison Senior High School
Kara SandOutstanding Elementary School TeacherIllinois Council of Teachers of MathematicsEdison Elementary School
Shelly SchaeferExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonRoosevelt School
Lauren Seka-StewardExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonEmge Junior High School
Ashley ShinnFamily Literacy AwardIllinois Reading CouncilNielson Elementary School
James Stark2017 Farrand Baker Illinois Latin Teacher of the YearIllinois Classical ConferenceCollinsville High School
Linda TessereauExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonWolf Branch Middle School
Scott TodnemHealth Teacher of the YearIllinois Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and DanceScullen Middle School
Brian TuckerJerry Johns Reading Educator of the Year AwardIllinois Reading CouncilWild Rose Elementary School
Haley UnderwoodElementary P.E. Teacher of the YearIllinois Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and DanceO'Neill Middle School
Elvia UriosteguiOutstanding Middle School TeacherIllinois Council of Teachers of MathematicsDaniel Webster Middle School
Cathy VanoExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonAlbert Cassens Elementary School
Jana VasquezExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonEdward A. Fulton Junior High School
Sandy VossSchool Nutrition ChampionIllinois State Board of EducationMarquardt School District 15
Christopher WendelinFinalist for 2017 Claes Nobel Educator of the YearNational Society of High School ScholarsAmos Alonzo Stagg High School<
Betsy WestergreenSecondary Teacher of the YearIllinois Business Education AssociationFlanagan-Cornell High School
Mary WiltjerT.E. Rine Award for Excellence in Secondary Mathematics TeachingIllinois Council of Teachers of MathematicsGlenbrook South High School
Corynn WheelanExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonHigh Mount School
Johannah WininskyDance Teacher of the YearIllinois Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and DanceNew Trier High School
Lori ZeiterExcellence in Teaching AwardEmersonBelle Valley School District 119
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12156/18/2018
  

​Students statewide to take PSAT 8/9, PSAT 10, and SAT beginning spring 2019​

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today posted a notice of award (reference #22041362) for the state’s procurement for aligned assessments in the ninth, 10th, and 11th grades. ISBE will provide the College Board’s PSAT 8/9 to all students in the ninth grade, PSAT 10 to all students in the 10th grade, and SAT to all students in the 11th grade for free beginning spring 2019. Offering these assessments will allow us to measure and support students’ growth in high school and to continue offering all students a free college entrance exam administered during the school day.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today posted a notice of award (reference #22041362) for the state's procurement for aligned assessments in the ninth, 10th, and 11th grades. ISBE will provide the College Board's PSAT 8/9 to all students in the ninth grade, PSAT 10 to all students in the 10th grade, and SAT to all students in the 11th grade for free beginning spring 2019. Offering these assessments will allow us to measure and support students' growth in high school and to continue offering all students a free college entrance exam administered during the school day.

The aligned assessments will measure students' mastery of the Illinois Learning Standards in English language arts and mathematics. The results will provide educators, families, and students with rich and meaningful data about students' academic growth from year to year. The results will help educators tailor instruction and ensure all students receive the individual supports they need to graduate prepared for college and career. Students and educators will continue to have access to free, supplemental resources from Khan Academy to support learning in the classroom.

“Our commitment to excellence and equity drives our assessment design," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We are excited to offer a growth measure in high school, in direct response to the needs and feedback of Illinois educators. The active and ongoing partnership of educators and practitioners has made Illinois a national leader in assessments. We look forward to continuing to work together to evolve our Illinois Assessments of Readiness to serve educators, students, and families with a more useful understanding of where students are in their learning journey today and how ready they are for what's in front of them tomorrow."

Students in the 11th grade statewide took the SAT as the state's accountability assessment and as a free college entrance exam for the first time in 2017.​

Illinois' system for support and accountability currently includes growth for students in the third through eighth grades. Illinois educators and educational leaders expressed a strong desire for the state to expand our assessments to measure growth in high school. The system considers multiple measures of school progress to find and highlight schools with effective practices and to identify schools for additional support.

Providing aligned assessments in high school creates the capacity for schools to support and measure students' performance and growth in high school. This also enables Illinois to potentially include that growth in the support and accountability system in the future. As with all other indicators for which there is not yet data, ISBE will collect three years of baseline data to ensure the indicator is valid and reliable and contributes to meaningful differentiation of school progress. ISBE will engage stakeholders before implementing changes to the approved support and accountability system.

​Smith shared additional information about Illinois' collective vision for assessments in a letter to district superintendents in February.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12146/8/2018
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. June 13.​
NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. June 13.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
June 13, 2018
9:00 a.m.

​Chicago Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor, 100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

​Springfield Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor, 100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Update on Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act​
  4. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: May 16, 2018
    2. *Rules Initial Review
      1. ​Part 227 (Gifted Education)
    3. *2019 Board Meeting Dates
    4. *National Association of State Boards of Education 2019 Membership Dues
    End of Consent Agenda
  5. ​​​Strategic Plan Progress Report
  6. ​​​Cut Score Recommendations for Redeveloped Licensure Tests: Foreign Language: French (252), Foreign Language: German (253), Foreign Language: Spanish (260), Foreign Language: Japanese (256), Music (212), General Middle Grades (298), and School Nurse (236)
  7. ​​​​Technical Advisory Committee Recommendations
  8. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  9. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  10. ​Closed Session (as needed)
  11. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
    2. Status of Agency Rulemaking: FY 2018
    3. Rulemakings Anticipated for FY 2019
  12. Adjourn​​​
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12135/31/2018
  

Families can find sites by texting “FoodIL" to 877-877​

​The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) will provide healthy meals and snacks this summer to children and teens age 18 and younger. The SFSP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by the Illinois State Board of Education in partnership with local organizations across the state.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) will provide healthy meals and snacks this summer to children and teens age 18 and younger. The SFSP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by the Illinois State Board of Education in partnership with local organizations across the state. 

Hunger touches every community in Illinois. The need is great for this critical program. Only 11 of every 100 children who receive a meal at school during the school year in Illinois receive an SFSP meal in the summer, according to the Food Research & Action Center's 2017 Summer Nutrition Status Report.

"Children need healthy food during the summer as much as they need it during the school year," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "The Summer Food Service Program brings critical resources to communities across the state and helps all our children stay ready to learn. ISBE is proud to administer the Summer Food Service Program."

Illinois sponsored more than 1,900 SFSP sites last summer throughout the state. Families can find their nearest summer meals site by calling (800) 359-2163, texting "FoodIL" to 877-877, or visiting http://summerfeedingillinois.org/.  

The SFSP provides funding to public or private nonprofit Local Education Agencies; entities of state, local, municipal, or county government; residential camps; private nonprofit organizations with 501(c)(3) status; and faith-based organizations to serve nutritious meals to children during the summer months when schools are not in session.

USDA Summer Food Service Program Service Requirements

All participating SFSP sponsors must provide free meals to all sites that meet income eligibility. Income eligibility can be determined through school attendance area data, census data, or household eligibility data.

Open sites and restricted open sites, which serve areas in which poor economic conditions exist, must provide meals to all children without charge. The meals must be the same for all children regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Sites will provide meals on a first-come, first-served basis.

Enrolled sites and camps must provide meals to all eligible children free of charge. Children must meet the income guidelines for reduced-price meals in the National School Lunch Program to be eligible to receive free meals at a residential camp or nonresidential camp. The income guidelines for reduced-price meals by family size are listed below. Children who are part of households that receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) benefits or benefits under Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) are automatically eligible to receive free meals. Acceptance and participation requirements for the program and all activities are the same for all regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.​

There will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service at any sites.

USDA Summer Food Service Program 2018 Income Guidelines

Household SizeAnnualMonthlyTwice Per MonthEvery Two WeeksWeekly
122,3111,860930859430
230,0442,5041,2521,156578
337,7773,1491,5751,453727
445,5103,7931,8971,751876
553,2434,4372,2192,0481,024
660,9765,0822,5412,3461,173
768,7095,7262,8632,6431,322
876,4426,3713,1862,9411,471​
For each additional family member, add:​
7,733645323298149​

​If a household's income falls within or below the listed guidelines, a family member should contact the site's sponsor to learn the benefits of the program. If the site does not meet area eligibility, families may be required to complete an application and provide income, TANF, or SNAP information. Please contact ISBE at (800) 545-7892 or at cnp@isbe.net for possible alternative methods to meet site eligibility.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) found on the USDA website and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit the completed form or letter to USDA by (1) mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture; Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights; 1400 Independence Avenue, SW; Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax at (202) 690-7442; or (3) email at program.intake@usda.gov.

​This institution is an equal opportunity provider.​​​


Assessment & AccountabilityBILDILLI LORI
12125/21/2018
  

​Statewide event for districts on June 26 will showcase incubators of innovation​​

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released a second Request for Applications for the second cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. The State Board will host an event on June 26 in Springfield for any districts interested in innovation and the exploration of competency-based practices. ​

NoNo
2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released a second Request for Applications for the second cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. The State Board will host an event on June 26 in Springfield for any districts interested in innovation and the exploration of competency-based practices. 

Competency-based practices decouple learning from the constraints of "seat time," allowing students to learn in communities and workplaces, as well as in classrooms. Competency-based education involves more personalized instruction, allowing students to learn at their own pace. Students work toward mastery of "competencies" – discrete skills and knowledge sets – and progress to new or more advanced content once they demonstrate mastery. 

"Encouraging competency-based and personalized learning is part of the State Board’s mission of equity," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Every student deserves an education that fosters their strengths and gives them the time and diverse opportunities they need to grow. 

"These pilot districts are really on the cutting edge," said Smith. "I encourage any school or district leader interested in this work to attend our event in Springfield on June 26."

Competency-based learning makes high school more relevant to students’ own strengths and interests and to the needs and opportunities of local employers and communities. Parents, families, and educators also more deeply understand where each student is in their learning and what they need to grow. 

School districts participating in the pilot will design their own competency-based education system with support from national experts and with input from local stakeholders. The districts in the pilot are building a community of practice and knowledge-sharing around innovative assessments, scheduling, teacher collaboration, and technology. 

All Illinois school districts serving grades 9 through 12 are eligible to apply to participate in the pilot. Districts interested in applying may access the application, as well as a library of research and resources, at www.isbe.net/competency​. Applications are due to ISBE by August 1, 2018.

Illinois Public Act 99-0674 (the Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act), passed unanimously by both legislative houses and signed into law by Governor Bruce Rauner on July 29, 2016, established the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program as one of a number of strategies to prepare more students for meaningful college and career opportunities.



External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12115/16/2018
  
State’s first-ever Public Inquiry concludes; 
road to transformation begins

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today recommended corrective actions for Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to improve its special education services to students. The State Board found that specific CPS policies and practices violated the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which protects students’ right to a free and appropriate public education. The State Board will meet with CPS to begin mapping out expeditious implementation of the recommendations.

NoNo
2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today recommended corrective actions for Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to improve its special education services to students. The State Board found that specific CPS policies and practices violated the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which protects students’ right to a free and appropriate public education. The State Board will meet with CPS to begin mapping out expeditious implementation of the recommendations.  

View the State Board’s findings of law and corrective actions for CPS in the packet for today’s board meeting, beginning on page 74. 

“The corrective action and recommendations we offered today are the right first step to helping CPS fully serve all children and families,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The common good requires uncommonly good public schools. With the State Board’s action today, the Public Inquiry process concludes, and the road to transformation begins.”

ISBE initiated the state’s first-ever Public Inquiry after receiving complaints about CPS’s special education services from parents and advocates. The Public Inquiry facilitated a fair and transparent fact-finding process, gathering substantial and detailed evidence from many sources. The final report contained 43 findings of fact upon which ISBE based its findings of law and its recommendations for corrective action. 

The corrective actions begin with the State Board appointing a special monitor to work with CPS to implement ISBE’s recommendations over the next three years. Changes to CPS’s special education policies and procedures will require review and approval by the monitor. ISBE will employ and pay the salary for the monitor. 

Other corrective actions recommended for CPS include:
  • Ensuring that the members of a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) team who are required to be present at IEP meetings to authorize decisions will be present at every IEP meeting;
  • Allowing IEP teams to determine paraprofessional support, extended school year, and transportation at IEP meetings;
  • Providing training to all staff regarding the use of the Student Services Management (SSM) system, an electronic program that guides users through a series of fillable forms designed to develop a complete IEP for a student, and the procedural manuals for using the SSM;
  • Ensuring the SSM and procedural guidelines are consistent at all times;
  • Working with ISBE to develop a data-driven approach to decision-making that will allow students to receive services in a timely manner;
  • Simplifying data collection forms;
  • Providing ISBE with the allocation/staffing formula used for the 2018-19 school year and working with ISBE to ensure the formula is clear and transparent;
  • Establishing an appeals process for budgeting that includes review by the ISBE-appointed monitor;
  • Engaging with stakeholder groups at regular intervals throughout the school year;
  • Providing training and communications to parents and guardians throughout the year regarding their rights, data-driven decision-making, the ISBE Parent’s Guide, and a list of free and low-cost legal services; 
  • Initiating a robust and transformative plan for training staff regarding federal and state special education laws, data-driven decision-making, and the SSM and procedural guidelines and drafting legally compliant IEPs. 
  • Working with ISBE to devise a plan to identify students whose services were delayed or denied and providing their parents and guardians the opportunity to pursue correction action.

ISBE will provide additional technical assistance and support as needed, including strengthening our role as the Regional Office of Education for CPS. 

ISBE will remain committed to transparency and will continue to post updates on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry​
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12105/11/2018
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. May 16 in Springfield.​
NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. May 16 in Springfield.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
May 16, 2018
10:30 a.m.

​Springfield Location: 100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Presentations and Updates​
    1. Technical Advisory Committee Update
    2. ​Government Accountability and Transparency Act Overview
  4. Closed Session
  5. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: April 18, 2018
    2. *Rules Initial Review
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Renewal of the Intergovernmental Agreement for the Illinois Interactive Report Card
    4. *Statewide Single Audit for Fiscal Year 2017
    End of Consent Agenda
  6. Corrective Actions and Recommendations for the Board Stemming from the Public Inquiry
  7. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. ESSA Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  8. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  9. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  10. Adjourn



External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12095/1/2018
  

​State Board, Horace Mann Companies, Illinois Association of School Administrators, and Illinois Principals Association honor 26 exceptional leaders

​Education leaders from around the state convened today to honor 26 outstanding administrators at the fourth annual Superintendents of Distinction and IPA Awards of Excellence Luncheon. 

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – Education leaders from around the state convened today to honor 26 outstanding administrators at the fourth annual Superintendents of Distinction and IPA Awards of Excellence Luncheon. The Illinois Association of School Administrators (IASA), Illinois Principals Association (IPA), Horace Mann Companies, and Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) hosted the event at The Inn at 835 in Springfield.

"Our superintendents and principals are shepherding schools through a transformational time in education,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., who delivered opening remarks at the event. “The leaders we honored today are among those going above and beyond to maximize opportunities and outcomes for each and every student. These leaders are not just building up their communities but also the social and economic future of our state.” 

Regional colleagues annually select their local Superintendents of Distinction, based on leadership for learning, communication, professionalism, and community involvement.  

“These individuals are driving improvements in public education by serving as a direct inspiration to teachers and promoting the success of students to be productive citizens in our communities,” said Brent Clark, Ph.D., executive director of IASA. “We are proud of the role each of these administrators has played through their varied and dedicated educational careers and are equally impressed by the meaningful action they are taking in leading the their respective school districts to be the best they can be.”

IPA encourages community members, teachers, administrators, and board members to nominate outstanding principals and assistant principals within their regions. Regional winners move on to the state level, where a committee of past IPA presidents selects an Elementary Principal of the Year, a Middle School/Junior High School Principal of the Year, a High School Principal of the Year, and an Assistant Principal of the Year.

“District and school leaders do some of our nation’s most challenging and critical work — ensuring young people receive the education and support they need to be productive citizens,” said Jason Leahy, executive director of IPA. “It is a pleasure to partner with ISBE, Horace Mann, and IASA to recognize our state’s best.”

“Our superintendents and principals are key to providing a healthy, supportive culture and atmosphere at their schools,” said Marita Zuraitis, president and chief executive officer of Horace Mann Companies, a national insurer that focuses on education. “As a company founded by educators for educators, we are proud to support the Superintendents of Distinction and the Principals of the Year and support their efforts to find solutions to the issues their educators face every day.”
ISBE, Horace Mann Companies, IASA, and IPA today recognized the following administrators:
Educator​
RecognitionOrganizationDistrict/School
Jack BaldermannHigh School Principal of the Year​ Illinois Principals AssociationWestmont High School
Dr. Kevin BlankenshipSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsScott-Morgan CUSD 2
Dr. PJ CaposeySuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsMeridian  CUSD 223
Daniel Cates Superintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsTownship High School District 211
Timothy ChipmanAssistant Principal of the YearIllinois Principals AssociationJacksonville High School
Mark CrossSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinoi​s Association of School Administrators
Peru ESD 124
Dr. Sharon Desmoulin-KheratSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School Administrators
Peoria Public School District 150
Adam EhrmanSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsNew Berlin CUSD 16
Crystal EnglandMiddle School Principal of the YearIllinois Principals AssociationHenry W Cowherd Middle School
Chris GrodeSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsMurphysboro CUSD 186
Dr. Patrick HalloranSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsMorris CHSD 101
Dr. Sheila Harrison-WilliamsSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsHazel Crest District 152.5
Julie KraemerSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsHutsonville CUSD 1
Scott KuffelSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsGeneseo CUSD 228
Dr. Michael LubelfeldSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsDeerfield District 109
Dr. Jean NealSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsGeorgetown-Ridge Farm CUSD 4
Timothy O'LearySuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsPickneyville School District 50
Dr. Glenn Schlicting Superintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsLaGrange School District 105
Rick SchmittSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsSandwich CUSD 430
Dr. David SchulerSuperintendent of the Year, National Superintendent of the YearIllinois Association of School Administrators, National Association of School AdministratorsTownship High School District 214
Jodi Scott Superintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsROE 33
Brad SkertichSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsSouthwestern CUSD 9
Victoria TabbertSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsQueen Bee School District 16
Jonathan TallmanSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsRed Bud CUSD 132
Gary TipsordSuperintendent of DistinctionIllinois Association of School AdministratorsLeRoy CUSD 2
Dr. Michelle WillisElementary School Principal of the YearIllinois Principals AssociationGillespie Technology Magnet Cluster School ​
​​

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12084/19/2018
  
ISBE leaders to recommend next steps at May 16 Board meeting
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today reviewed the final report from the Public Inquiry Team appointed to examine special education services in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The Inquiry Team found systemic problems that delayed and denied the provision of special education services to students. Policies, procedures, and systems also hindered the ability of educators and families to advocate for the services students needed.​
NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today reviewed the final report from the Public Inquiry Team appointed to examine special education services in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The Inquiry Team found systemic problems that delayed and denied the provision of special education services to students. Policies, procedures, and systems also hindered the ability of educators and families to advocate for the services students needed.

The Public Inquiry report contains 43 findings of fact. The Inquiry Team found widespread issues with CPS's Student Services Management (SSM) system, an electronic program that guides users through a series of fillable forms designed to develop a complete Individualized Education Program (IEP) for a student, and with the procedural manuals for using the SSM. The Inquiry Team also found systemic problems with CPS's processes for collecting data to assess students' need for services, authorizing IEP teams' recommendations for students, and providing transportation for students.

“We have an obligation as the leaders of public education systems to create conditions that support every single child in our care," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “I deeply appreciate the full participation of all of the parties throughout this first-of-its-kind process in Illinois. This Public Inquiry allowed us to examine CPS's special education program not just from an administrative compliance perspective but also from the view of the families and educators trying to provide students the best educational experience possible. We are encouraged that CPS has already begun taking steps to improve on the issues discussed in the report. We look forward to working together to build on CPS's strengths and ensure all students receive the supports they need to thrive."

ISBE General Counsel Stephanie Jones and ISBE Executive Director of Special Education Services Heather Calomese will meet with CPS and the advocates who brought the initial complaint to ISBE to develop a plan to ensure the concerns noted in the report are resolved prior to next school year. Jones and Calomese will recommend next steps at the State Board meeting on May 16 in Springfield.

ISBE initiated the state's first-ever Public Inquiry after receiving concerns about potentially systemic issues with CPS's special education program from families, educators, and stakeholders. The Public Inquiry process facilitates fair and transparent fact-finding on a matter of public concern, while maintaining the focus on the well-being and rights of students.

The Inquiry team held six public comment sessions, received input through a dedicated hotline, collected extensive documentation, and hosted a three-day open hearing to probe the evidence by asking questions of witnesses.

View the Public Inquiry team's final report.​

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12074/13/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. April 18.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. April 18.

View the packet for t​he board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
April 18, 2018
9:00 a.m.

Chicago Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
                               100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
                                    100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Presentations and Updates​
    1. Technical Advisory Committee Update
    2. ​Public Inquiry for CPS Special Education Issues Update
  4. Closed Session (as needed)
  5. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: March 14, 2018
    2. *Rules Initial Review
      1. Part 130 (Determining Special Education Per Capita Tuition Charge)
    3. *Rules for Approval
      1. Part 203 (Low-Income Students Funds Plan)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Renewal of Intergovernmental Agreement for the Learning Technology Centers
      2. Renewal Intergovernmental Agreement for the Illinois Virtual School
      3. Intergovernmental Agreement for the Illinois Early Childhood Asset Map
      4. Grant with Illinois State University for the Illinois Teaching Excellence Program
      5. Renewal of Intergovernmental Agreement with Illinois State University to Administer the Illinois National Board Professional Preparation and Support System
      6. Grant Agreement with Teach for America
      7. Renewal of Contract with IBM for ISBE Student Information System Information Technology Support
      8. Truants' Alternative and Optional Education Program Grants
      9. Intergovernmental Agreement with Illinois State University for Content Specialists
    5. *Special Education Expenditure and Receipts Report
    6. *Statewide Single Audit
    End of Consent Agenda
  6. Student Success/School Quality Indicators
  7. ​Cut Score Recommendations for Redeveloped Licensure Tests: English Language Arts (207), Mathematics (208), Social Science: Economics (244), Social Science: Geography (245), Social Science: History (246), Social Science: Political Science (247), Social Science: Psychology (248), and Social Science: Sociology and Anthropology (249)
  8. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. ​Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  9. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  10. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  11. Adjourn
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12064/5/2018
  

​Staggering inequity: School districts range from having less than half to almost three times the statutory definition of adequate funding

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued vouchers to the Illinois State Comptroller, paving the way for the tier funding portion of fiscal year 2018 Evidence-Based Funding to flow to the most under-resourced districts. 

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued vouchers to the Illinois State Comptroller, paving the way for the tier funding portion of fiscal year 2018 Evidence-Based Funding to flow to the most under-resourced districts. 

ISBE issued vouchers according to the planned timeline, concluding months of extraordinary partnership with school districts and lawmakers to deliver accurate and on-time distributions. 

“Implementing a radically new funding formula required extraordinary effort by ISBE staff and school districts,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “I deeply appreciate Governor Rauner and the General Assembly’s commitment through the passage, cleanup, and distribution of this historic first year of Evidence-Based Funding.” 

ISBE posted the complete model of fiscal year 2018 Evidence-Based Funding calculations on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/ebfdist​.  

“The EBF numbers show staggering inequity,” Smith said. “We now have common language to talk about the needs of our students and the situated-ness of our schools within communities. We have a common understanding of what all of our children deserve. Evidence-Based Funding puts us on the path to deliver on the promise of equity for all Illinois’ students. Investing in equity is the superior growth strategy for our state.”

ISBE led a collaborative process with school districts to verify detailed enrollment counts for the past three years. The EBF formula defines an adequate funding target for each school district, based on enrollment numbers and the cost of 34 factors proven to deliver the greatest positive impact to students. The formula compares each district’s current resources to its unique adequacy target. Increases in state education appropriations go to the most under-resourced districts. 

Tier funding totals approximately $395 million statewide, including $29 million specifically for English Learners in the highest need districts. ISBE issues EBF vouchers twice per month from August through June. School districts have been receiving the base funding minimum, or hold harmless, portion of EBF. The final six EBF vouchers for FY 2018 will contain all of the FY 2018 tier funding. The Comptroller is responsible for processing the vouchers and distributing funds to school districts.

The EBF formula requires an additional $7.2 billion investment to provide adequate funding for every school district in the state.

Learn more about the Evidence-Based Funding formula at https://www.isbe.net/ebf2018​



Assessment & AccountabilityAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12053/22/2018
  

Pilot provides unique opportunity to redesign high school 

​State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., today announced six school districts joining the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program in the pilot’s second cohort. Representatives from Belvidere School District 100 joined Smith at Belvidere North High School and took a tour of the school’s agricultural program, which is part of the district’s competency-based model for career pathways.

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2018
SPRINGFIELD – State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., today announced six school districts joining the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program in the pilot’s second cohort. Representatives from Belvidere School District 100 joined Smith at Belvidere North High School and took a tour of the school’s agricultural program, which is part of the district’s competency-based model for career pathways.

The 15 total districts in the pilot each have a unique strategy for implementing competency-based learning and teaching. These pilot districts are creatively using technology, assessments, staffing, schedules, and local partnerships to maximize opportunities for students. 

“Competency-based education re-engages students in their learning by putting them in the driver’s seat,” said Smith. “This is the new frontier of college and career preparation. The jobs of tomorrow need adaptive, critical thinkers with a sense of purpose. I applaud our pilot districts for their leadership and for showing that districts anywhere of any size can innovate with competency-based learning in ways that work for their communities.”

Competency-based programs assess and advance students based on their demonstrated mastery of skills and knowledge. The competency-based model removes the constraints of “seat time” and allows for student-driven learning inside and outside of the classroom. This approach can make education more relevant both to students and to local employers.

“Our community wants high schools that are relevant to today's world and better prepare students with the skills they need,” said Belvidere School District 100 Superintendent Dr. Daniel Woestman. “Competency-based education has the ability to provide that in a better way - and make our high schools not only more effective but more equitable for all of our children. We are grateful for this support from the Illinois State Board of Education, which will empower our teachers to incorporate new and more individualized solutions that support our students.”  

The school districts joining the competency-based learning pilot’s second cohort are: 
  • Belvidere School District 100 
  • Chicago Public Schools (five additional schools: Back of the Yards College Preparatory High School, Curie Metropolitan High School, Disney II Magnet School, Northside College Preparatory High School, Phoenix Military Academy)
  • Community Unit School District 300 
  • Maine Township High School District 207 
  • Paris Cooperative High School
  • Urbana School District 116
Smith also announced at the event that the Illinois State Board of Education will open the application process for districts to join this cohort of the pilot in May. 

“We are so excited about the momentum building around this work. We want to expand this opportunity to as many schools as allowed by law,” Smith said. 

All of the districts in the pilot will convene this summer to receive coaching from national experts and to continue building a community of practice. Learn more about competency-based education at www.isbe.net/competency​.


External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
12043/19/2018
  
Student Advisory Council creates space for students to ask and answer questions about preparing for their futures

SPRINGFIELD – The Student Advisory Council (SAC), which provides feedback and insights to the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), launched a new Student Voices microsite at www.isbe.net/studentvoices to create space for students statewide to ask and answer questions about preparing for their futures.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Student Advisory Council (SAC), which provides feedback and insights to the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), launched a new Student Voices microsite at www.isbe.net/studentvoices to create space for students statewide to ask and answer questions about preparing for their futures.

The microsite links to resources such as the Illinois Reality Check personal budgeting application, the Illinois Student Assistance Commission’s guide on paying for college, the Illinois PaCE: Postsecondary and Career Expectations framework, and ISBE’s resources for dealing with health topics such as bullying.

“The members of the State Board and I deeply appreciate the good work and leadership of the Student Advisory Council and the value their voices bring to the table,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The thoughtfulness they have put into this project shows just a small fraction of their contributions to ISBE and to their school communities. This new microsite provides a critical vehicle for including student voices in the conversation about improving workforce development and career pathways.”

The microsite originated from the SAC’s yearlong project on college and career preparation that they presented to the State Board at last week’s board meeting. The SAC identified post-high school readiness as a common source of stress for themselves and their peers.

“There’s not a single student unaffected by the overwhelming state of our current transition process,” said Neha Arun, a junior at Carterville High School and member of the Student Advisory Council. “School counselors are stretched so thin that students are not getting the one-on-one guidance they need. We hope the Student Voices website can help fill a gap in delivering resources and create space for students to express their shared worries and questions.”

The microsite provides opportunities for any student to share information and experiences with each other through questions, answers, photos, and quotes.

“A school’s culture and socioeconomic status often determine the types of information students receive,” said Kathleen Rock, a senior at Byron High School and member of the Student Advisory Council. “Increasing the availability of information about diverse options and ways to prepare can help decrease inequity across Illinois. We want to improve students’ abilities to choose and prepare for their next step after high school, whether technical education, service in the Armed Forces, or college.”

The members of the Student Advisory Council are a diverse group of active students who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and teamwork abilities. Applications for the 2018-19 Student Advisory Council are available at www.isbe.net/studentadvisory.

View the full list of 2017-18 members, many of whom are available for comment, at www.isbe.net/Lists/News/NewsDisplay.aspx?ID=1125.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12033/15/2018
  
Public Inquiry team and parties to probe evidence and testimony from extensive document collection and public comment

SPRINGFIELD – The open hearing for the Public Inquiry examining special education services and procedures in Chicago Public Schools will begin on Tuesday, March 20, and continue on Wednesday, March 21, and Tuesday, March 27. The hearing will begin at 9 a.m. each day. The hearing will allow the Public Inquiry team, as well as the parties to the Inquiry, to ask questions of witnesses regarding the collected evidence and testimony.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The open hearing for the Public Inquiry examining special education services and procedures in Chicago Public Schools will begin on Tuesday, March 20, and continue on Wednesday, March 21, and Tuesday, March 27. The hearing will begin at 9 a.m. each day. The hearing will allow the Public Inquiry team, as well as the parties to the Inquiry, to ask questions of witnesses regarding the collected evidence and testimony.

Members of the public and the media may attend the hearing in person in the auditorium of Chicago-Kent College of Law at 565 W. Adams St. and/or watch the hearing via a livestream that will be available at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry. ISBE will create and post an agenda for each day of the hearing at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry, including the issues the Public Inquiry will explore that day, the witnesses set to present oral testimony, and any time allotted for opening or closing statements.

ISBE launched the state's first-ever Public Inquiry in November 2017 to examine special education services and policies in Chicago Public Schools District 299 (CPS). ISBE initiated the Public Inquiry after receiving concerns about potentially systemic issues from families and stakeholders, including in an October 2017 WBEZ report.

The hearing follows six public comment sessions held in different locations across Chicago in February and March, input received through a dedicated hotline, and extensive collection of documents. ISBE made translation services available in Spanish, Mandarin, and Cantonese.

The Public Inquiry process facilitates fair and transparent fact-finding on a matter of public concern. The Public Inquiry seeks to determine the facts surrounding the stated concerns while maintaining the focus on the students. The Public Inquiry team will present its findings to the State Board in a final report in April.

ISBE has posted the list of issues the hearing will address and all documentation obtained during the Public Inquiry process on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry

WHAT:

Three-day hearing for the state's first-ever Public Inquiry examining special education services and policies in CPS. The hearing will allow the Public Inquiry team, as well as the parties to the Inquiry, to ask questions of witnesses regarding the collected evidence and testimony.

 

WHO:

The Public Inquiry team consists of:

  • Nancy Krent: Professor of school law at Chicago-Kent College of Law and Loyola University Chicago School of Law and a special education attorney
  • Rich Cozzola: LAF (formerly the Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago), representing the special education advocates who filed the initial complaint with ISBE
  • Rupa Ramadurai: ISBE's assistant general counsel for special education

The parties to the Inquiry consist of:

ISBE will create and post an agenda for each day of the hearing listing the witnesses set to present oral testimony.

WHEN:

Tuesday, March 20, at 9 a.m.

Wednesday, March 21, at 9 a.m.

Tuesday, March 27, at 9 a.m.

WHERE:

Auditorium of Chicago-Kent College of Law at 565 W. Adams St.

AUDIO/

VIDEO:

Livestream will be available at www.isbe.net/publicinquiry.

Check in at the registration desk to plug into mult box and/or set up camera.


External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12023/14/2018
  
2018 School District Financial Profiles show improving fiscal health yet inadequate resources

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today approved the 2018 School District Financial Profiles, which are based on fiscal year 2017 financial data. The annual profiles provide an informational snapshot of school districts’ financial health and promote sound financial management. Each school district’s profile shows a score from 1.00 (lowest financial strength) to 4.00 (highest financial strength) and a corresponding designation (1.00 through 2.61: Financial Watch; 2.62 through 3.07: Financial Warning; 3.08 through 3.53: Financial Review; and 3.54 through 4.00: Financial Recognition).

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today approved the 2018 School District Financial Profiles, which are based on fiscal year 2017 financial data. The annual profiles provide an informational snapshot of school districts’ financial health and promote sound financial management. Each school district’s profile shows a score from 1.00 (lowest financial strength) to 4.00 (highest financial strength) and a corresponding designation (1.00 through 2.61: Financial Watch; 2.62 through 3.07: Financial Warning; 3.08 through 3.53: Financial Review; and 3.54 through 4.00: Financial Recognition).

The 2018 profiles show overall improving fiscal health as well as inadequate resources. The second-greatest number of school districts achieved Financial Recognition in the 15-year history of the tool. However, the majority of school districts in Financial Recognition have less than 75 percent of the statutory definition of adequate resources, according to preliminary Evidence-Based Funding calculations.

“The large number of districts in Financial Recognition is a testament to the acumen of our superintendents and boards of education,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “What the profiles do not show, however, are the hard choices and sacrifices school districts have had to make in terms of academic opportunity in order to maintain fiscal solvency. Preliminary Evidence-Based Funding numbers show the vast majority of school districts do not have adequate resources. When school districts are forced to sacrifice academic opportunity, the state loses out on tremendous human capital. We must continue to invest in our students and our schools to secure a better social and economic future for Illinois.”

Half of the districts in the Watch category rely on state funding to provide 40 percent or more of their resources. They may also have to tax at a higher rate than other similar districts to obtain the same amount of local funding, due to lower local property wealth.

ISBE developed the School District Financial Profile in 2003 in partnership with experts in finance and lending, credit agencies, and school business officials. The profile examines five key indicators of financial integrity: fund balance to revenue ratio, expenditure to revenue ratio, days cash on hand, percentage of short-term borrowing ability remaining, and percentage of long-term borrowing ability remaining.

ISBE offers financial management guidance and technical assistance to all school districts and provides increased support to districts in Financial Watch. ISBE staff help districts prepare and monitor cash flows and provide recommendations on operational needs. ISBE staff assist with financial projections and weighing options for improving financial health.

View the 2018 School District Financial Profiles.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersNewsBILDILLI LORI
12013/13/2018
  
Three students to receive recognition for outstanding arts week poster designs

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) Wednesday will honor the three students whose designs won first, second, and third place in the 36th annual Illinois Arts Education Week statewide poster contest. The board will recognize the student artists at its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. March 14 at 100 N. First St. in Springfield. A framed poster with the first-place winner’s design will hang in the ISBE Board meeting room in Springfield.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) Wednesday will honor the three students whose designs won first, second, and third place in the 36th annual Illinois Arts Education Week statewide poster contest. The board will recognize the student artists at its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. March 14 at 100 N. First St. in Springfield. A framed poster with the first-place winner's design will hang in the ISBE Board meeting room in Springfield.

Governor Bruce Rauner declared March 12-18, 2018, as Illinois Arts Education Week. 

“The arts are an essential part of a basic education for all students," Governor Rauner said. “The arts help students develop creativity, enhance cultural understanding, and tap into their full potential. Congratulations to the arts week poster contest winners and the educators who support the development of their skills and appreciation for the arts."

The students' designs illustrated the 2018 arts week theme “The ARTS Make History Come Alive!" in conjunction with the Illinois Bicentennial. View the winning posters.

“Thank you to all of the students who worked hard and submitted beautiful and thought-provoking designs," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “A special congratulations to our three winners and to their art teachers for nurturing their talent and passion. The arts empower students to contemplate and express their ideas about history, culture, and their own experiences in new ways. All students deserve the opportunity to explore and create through high-quality arts programs."

The 2018 poster contest accepted entries from any student in kindergarten through eighth grade. The following students created the winning designs:

  • First place: Tejaswi Achanta, taught by art teacher Deyana Matt at Westfield Middle School in Bloomingdale School District 13
  • Second place: Alec Osato, taught by art teacher Deyana Matt at Westfield Middle School in Bloomingdale School District 13
  • Third place: Audrey Lupton, taught by art teacher Amy Minch at Franklin Middle School in Springfield Public Schools District 186 

The Illinois Art Education Association (IAEA) also will recognize the poster contest winners at the 70th annual IAEA Fall Conference on November 10 in Bloomington.

Schools and the public may request posters by contacting ISBE's College and Career Readiness Division at (217) 524-4832, arts@isbe.net, or via mail at 100 N. First St., C-215, Springfield, IL 62777-0001.

Board ServicesAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
12003/9/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. March 14 in Springfield.

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. March 14 in Springfield.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. March 14 in Springfield.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
March 14, 2018
10:30 a.m.

100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Resolutions and Recognition
    1. Illinois Arts Education Week Poster Winners
  4. Presentations and Updates​
    1. Student Advisory Council Final Presentation
  5. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes:February 14, 2018
    2. *Rules for Approval
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition and Supervision)
      2. Part 25 (Educator Licensure)
      3. Part 33 (Programs for the Preparation of Superintendents in Illinois)
      4. Part 252 (Driver Education)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Intergovernmental Agreement with Sangamon-Menard Regional Office of Education #51
    4. *2018 Spring Waiver Report
    End of Consent Agenda
  6. Student Success/School Quality Indicators
  7. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Evidence-Based Funding Update
    5. ESSA Update
    6. Teacher Workforce Project Update
    7. Other Items for Discussion
  8. Closed Session
  9. Approval of Closed Session Minutes
  10. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  11. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  12. Adjourn

Board ServicesAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11992/22/2018
  

Chicago Public Schools named national AP District of the Year

Data released by the College Board show Illinois’ efforts to improve students’ access to Advanced Placement (AP) are paying off. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) covered a portion of the AP exam fee for all students who qualified as low-income in 2017. The fee reduction resulted in an 11 percent increase in the number of low-income students taking AP exams over 2016 levels – well above the 7 percent national increase and three times greater than the 3.6 percent average increase in states that did not provide funding.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – Data released by the College Board show Illinois' efforts to improve students' access to Advanced Placement (AP) are paying off. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) covered a portion of the AP exam fee for all students who qualified as low-income in 2017. The fee reduction resulted in an 11 percent increase in the number of low-income students taking AP exams over 2016 levels – well above the 7 percent national increase and three times greater than the 3.6 percent average increase in states that did not provide funding.

Success on AP exams can earn students early college credit, potentially making college more affordable or allowing students to take more advanced or elective courses. In May 2017, the state's public and private high school students earned a 3 or higher on 141,383 AP exams. Illinois' AP program delivered a total potential cost savings of $192,576,370 for students and families in a single year, assuming an average rate of three credit hours granted per AP exam by colleges and universities at an average of $454.03 per credit hour.

“We have tremendous human capital in Illinois," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Closing gaps in opportunity and support for our students drives economic and social growth for our communities. The success of our AP program shows what happens when we invest in equity."

The College Board also named Chicago Public Schools the national AP District of the Year among all large-sized school districts in the United States and Canada. The College Board selects one AP District of the Year for each category of districts (small-, medium-, and large-sized) based on an analysis of three academic years of AP data. Illinois school districts have won AP District of the Year awards in five of the past eight years – a testament to Illinois' efforts to maximize college and career opportunities for all students.

ISBE has requested an appropriation of $2 million in fiscal year 2019 to continue providing the fee reduction for low-income students and making AP participation possible for all students. The agency also has requested $1 million to expand the AP program to additional schools through teacher professional development and assistance for students to enroll and succeed in AP courses. Part of this funding will support the Lead Higher Initiative, whose partnership with Illinois aims to enroll 100,000 low-income students and students of color in AP and International Baccalaureate courses.

Additional highlights from Illinois' AP successes include:

  • 23 Illinois school districts made the class of 2017 AP District Honor Roll. (Full list available on the College Board site.)
  • Illinois is outpacing the nation in increasing the number of Hispanic students taking AP exams. Hispanic students' participation increased by 12.1 percent from 2016 to 2017 in Illinois – compared to 8.8 percent nationally.
  • 26.3 percent of Illinois students in the class of 2017 scored a 3 or higher on an AP exam during high school – up from 14.5 percent in 2007. Illinois ranks fifth in the nation for growth over the past 10 years in the number of students scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam during high school.
  • 38.9 percent of Illinois students in the class of 2017 took an AP exam during high school – up from 21.2 percent in 2007.
  • 63.9 percent of AP exams taken by Illinois students in the class of 2017 resulted in a score of 3 or higher – compared to 56.2 percent nationally. (Individual students may take more than one exam.)
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersNewsBILDILLI LORI
11982/20/2018
  

​Dr. Blondean Davis honored with Women in School Leadership Superintendent Award and Dr. Jane Westerhold with Distinguished Service Award​

​AASA, a professional organization for more than 13,000 educational leaders, recently honored three top educational leaders from Illinois with prestigious national awards at the organization’s annual National Conference on Education. AASA named Township High School District 214’s Dr. David Schuler the 2018 AASA National Superintendent of the Year®. Matteson School District 162’s Dr. Blondean Davis received the Women in School Leadership Superintendent Award for outstanding women administrators. Former Des Plaines School District 62 Superintendent Dr. Jane Westerhold received one of five Distinguished Service Awards for veteran educational leaders.

NoNo
2018
SPRINGFIELD – AASA, a professional organization for more than 13,000 educational leaders, recently honored three top educational leaders from Illinois with prestigious national awards at the organization’s annual National Conference on Education. AASA named Township High School District 214’s Dr. David Schuler the 2018 AASA National Superintendent of the Year®. Matteson School District 162’s Dr. Blondean Davis received the Women in School Leadership Superintendent Award for outstanding women administrators. Former Des Plaines School District 62 Superintendent Dr. Jane Westerhold received one of five Distinguished Service Awards for veteran educational leaders.

“This is an incredible moment for Illinois,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Our state is rich in educators demonstrating extraordinary talent and leadership. Our educators are not only implementing today’s best practices but also developing the best practices of tomorrow. Superintendents Schuler, Davis, and Westerhold represent the deep capacity and commitment I see in districts across the state. They deserve every bit of praise and appreciation.”

Schuler leads AASA’s Redefining Ready! program, an initiative to assess students’ readiness for college, career, and life through research-based metrics. Schuler’s Redefining Ready! work provided critical contributions to the formulation of Illinois’ Every Student Succeeds Act Plan. 

Schuler’s push to make college more accessible and affordable led to the implementation of a comprehensive career pathways program in District 214, which has its central office in Arlington Heights. The program offers personalized learning experiences through early college credit, internships, and career credentials. In a single year, students in District 214 earned more than 27,000 early college credits. 

Schuler also served as the 2015-16 president of AASA. His district consistently achieves excellence in financial management and academic performance. Under Schuler’s leadership, District 214 joined the IL-EMPOWER pilot to refine the state’s new statewide system of support incorporating peer-to-peer professional learning. 

“I’m so honored and privileged to serve as superintendent of High School District 214. This award (is) an amazing recognition of the work that our team, our kids, and our families have done,” said Schuler. “The National Superintendent of the Year® award elevates our profession and our vocation by celebrating the work that we all do. This award goes to one person, but it’s a reflection of the work that all superintendents do on a daily basis.”  

With the award comes a $10,000 college scholarship that AASA will present to a student in Schuler’s name. Hear more from Schuler at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1oLKKWI0sA

Davis, the winner of AASA’s Women in School Leadership Superintendent Award, has led District 162 since 2002 with a deep focus on equity and rigor. Davis also serves as the founding chief executive officer of Southland College Prep Charter High School. Ninety-nine percent of Southland students graduate within four years, and 86 percent enroll in a two-year or four-year college in the United States within 16 months of graduating. Davis’ achievements earned her the title of Illinois Association of School Administrators Superintendent of the Year in 2008. Hear more from Davis at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1oLKKWI0sA.

Westerhold received an AASA Distinguished Service Award recognizing her many accomplishments over the course of her career of more than 40 years. Westerhold oversaw the opening of a comprehensive early learning center and spearheaded the digital transformation of teaching and learning in District 62. She has received multiple honors and awards from diverse organizations, including the Illinois State Board of Education. Learn more about Westerhold at http://www.aasa.org/content.aspx?id=42124​

Please contact Jackie Matthews at (217) 782-4648 for photos from the event.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11972/14/2018
  
Results fuel conversations about local successes in implementing new science learning standards

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the school-, district-, and state-level aggregate scores for the 2017 Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/ISA. The second year of ISA results provides additional data to help educators and administrators identify local successes in implementing the new Illinois Learning Standards for science.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the school-, district-, and state-level aggregate scores for the 2017 Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/ISA. The second year of ISA results provides additional data to help educators and administrators identify local successes in implementing the new Illinois Learning Standards for science. 

The standards took effect in February 2014 and signaled a new era of science instruction. They encourage students to see science all around them. Students in classrooms today use scientific methods and tools to ask questions about phenomena, design experiments, and evaluate real-world sources of information. Educators act as facilitators, rather than lecturers, prompting robust student discussions and guiding students to direct their own learning. Illinois’ standards incorporate the national Next Generation Science Standards.

“The Illinois Science Assessment is one component supporting a high-quality, 21st-century science education,” said State Superintendent Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The new standards represent a shift in how students engage with and how educators teach science. The new standards make science more accessible, opening career and college doors for students. Districts and schools can put the ISA results in conversation with other assessment results and data to identify local successes in implementing the new learning standards and support continuous improvement.”

Districts and schools around the state are making progress toward closing the achievement gap between student demographic groups. The data show where schools and districts are supporting low-income students, English Learners, and students with disabilities in outperforming the state average for their demographic group and for the “all students” group in their grade level. Looking to the promising practices in these districts can inform continuous improvement across the state. Statewide ISA scores decreased slightly from 2016 to 2017. The pattern of performance across grade levels remained consistent. The statewide 2017 ISA results reflect a foundation of mastery in the “all students” groups in the fifth and eighth grades. Results in high school are lower than in the other grades, both in 2016 and in 2017. The statewide participation rate for the 2017 ISA increased from 93.1 percent to 94.4 percent.

The ISA was designed to reflect classroom experiences. The questions ask students to apply scientific knowledge and reasoning to real-world problems. This assessment pushes students to apply their knowledge in their responses, thus better preparing students for postsecondary and a career. The test is untimed, but designed to take approximately one hour. Each student’s score between 200 and 400 correlates to one of two performance levels: Proficient or Not Proficient.

Neither the 2016 nor the 2017 ISA results will count toward accountability for schools and districts. The percentage of students scoring in the Proficient performance level will contribute 5 percent of each school and district’s balanced accountability rating beginning with the 2020 administration.

An FAQ with additional information about the ISA, the performance levels, and the process for scoring the assessment is available at https://www.isbe.net/ISA.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersNewsBILDILLI LORI
11962/9/2018
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. Feb 14.​

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago at 9 a.m. Feb 14.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
February 14, 2018
9 a.m.

Chicago Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
                               100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
                                    100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. II. Swearing-in of Board Member Mitchell Holzrichter
  3. Public Participation
  4. Presentations and Updates
    1. Partnership for Educator Preparation Update
  5. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: January 17, 2018
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition and Supervision)
      2. Part 226 (Special Education)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 27 (Standards for Endorsements in Specific Teaching Fields)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant Amendment
      2. Request for Sealed Proposals for the Evaluation of the IL-EMPOWER Statewide System of Support
      3. Facilitating Coordination of Agricultural Education Grant
      4. Request for Sealed Proposals for the Administration of the Grades 3-8 Accountability Assessment>
    5. *2018 Spring Waiver Report
    End of Consent Agenda
  6. VI. 2017 Illinois Science Assessment Results
  7. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    5. Site-Based Expenditure Reporting – Guidance Release
    6. Tier Funding Distribution Timeline for Evidence-Based Funding
    7. Other Items for Discussion
  8. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. Member Reports
  9. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  10. Closed Session (as needed)
  11. Adjourn

Board ServicesAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11951/31/2018
  

​Program helps thousands of children and teens in Illinois stay healthy and ready to learn

​The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) needs additional sponsors to help fill gaps in access to healthy meals. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) administers the federally funded program to ensure all children receive the nutrition they need so they can return to school in the fall healthy and ready to learn. Twenty-eight counties in Illinois counties do not have any SFSP serving sites.

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2018

​SPRINGFIELD – The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) needs additional sponsors to help fill gaps in access to healthy meals. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) administers the federally funded program to ensure all children receive the nutrition they need so they can return to school in the fall healthy and ready to learn. Twenty-eight counties in Illinois counties do not have any SFSP serving sites.

“Hunger does not take a summer break," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “There are children and teens in every community in need of a reliable source of healthy meals when school lets out for summer. The tie between sufficient healthy food and our ability to learn is indisputable. I want to extend my sincere appreciation to all of our current summer food sponsors and to anyone who is considering joining to help us close gaps in access to healthy food in Illinois."

For every 100 children nationally who received meals through the National School Lunch Programs (NSLP) in the 2015-16 school year, only 15 received meals over the following summer. In 2017, 164 SFSP sponsors and 141 sponsors of Seamless Summer (an option available to current NSLP sponsors) distributed meals and snacks at about 2,200 sites in Illinois.  

SFSP provides nutritious meals to children and teens, age 18 and younger, during the summer months when school is not in session. Families can find their nearest summer meals site by calling (800) 359-2163, texting “FoodIL" to 877-877, or visitinghttp://summerfeedingillinois.org/>The Summer Meals webpage.  

SFSP sponsors manage and develop their own sites and receive federal reimbursement via ISBE to cover the administrative and operating costs of preparing and serving meals. School districts, local governments, and nonprofits can become sponsors and set up serving sites at schools, parks, recreation centers, resource centers, churches, summer camps, libraries, and other community locations. Those interested in becoming SFSP sponsors should contact ISBE at (800) 545-7892. 

Participation in one training session is required to become a new SFSP sponsor. Registration is available at http://webprod1.isbe.net/cnscalendar/asp/eventlist.asp. The new sponsor training workshops are scheduled 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for the following dates and locations:

  • Feb. 28 in Marion​
  • March 21 in Alsip
  • April 4 in Fairview Heights
  • April 11 in Schaumburg
  • April 25 in Peoria
  • May 16 in Springfield 

For more information, visit:

### 

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement

In accordance with federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its agencies, offices and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. 

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. 

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) found online​ and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. Fax: (202) 690-7442; or
  3. Email: program.intake@usda.gov.  

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11931/17/2018
  

​Recommended investment for FY 2019 would fulfill state’s constitutional mandate and secure a better social and economic future for the state

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today approved its budget request for public education funding for fiscal year 2019. ISBE recommended an investment to support educational excellence totaling approximately $15.7 billion in State General Funds.

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today approved its budget request for public education funding for fiscal year 2019. ISBE recommended an investment to support educational excellence totaling approximately $15.7 billion in State General Funds.

The recommended investment includes an Evidence-Based Funding (EBF) level that would ensure every school district in the state can cover the cost of providing a quality education to all students when combined with federal funding and local resources. The EBF investment would fulfill the State's constitutional mandate to assume the primary responsibility for financing the system of public education. View the complete and approved budget request beginning on page 84 at https://www.isbe.net/Documents_Board_Meetings/20180117-Packet.pdf.

Preliminary EBF Adequacy Target calculations show current funding levels result in deep inequity in Illinois' public schools. School districts in Illinois range from having 46 percent to 284 percent of the resources necessary to provide a quality education to students. The EBF Adequacy Target represents the cost of providing the best practices for staffing and other resources defined in the EBF law.

“The Adequacy Target gives us a common understanding of what students deserve for a quality education and whether the state is adequately supporting districts in meeting students' needs," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The Illinois constitution is clear that the State is primarily responsible for funding schools. Our new funding formula is grounded in equity and recognizes that children and families across the state are situated differently. But the formula alone does not address the deep inequity we see – we now have to fund the formula to create the conditions for every child to thrive. The children in school today are not able to wait for another opportunity at a quality education. A better social and economic future for the state depends on providing all children with the quality education they deserve today."

The EBF formula provides a path toward adequacy and equity for all school districts – but only if funded. The primary funding source for public education in Illinois remains local property taxes. ISBE's FY 2019 budget recommendation reflects the belief that “primary responsibility" constitutes ensuring every district can meet at least 90 percent of its individual Adequacy Target through a combination of state and local funding. Federal grants on average supply the remaining 10 percent of school funding.

ISBE's budget recommendation focuses on improving college and career readiness for all students through investments in equity, quality, community, and educator recruitment and recognition. The budget recommendation evolved from the stories of school districts statewide that are utilizing state funds to transform student outcomes and strengthen their communities. These districts prove that investments in effective educators, digital learning, diverse pathways to success, and family engagement are necessary to equip students to become socially and economically secure adults. The current generation of students represents the future of Illinois. A better future requires investments to ensure all students have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to thrive. ISBE's FY 2019 budget recommendation includes the requests below, in addition to other line items:

Equity – Provide each child with the individualized supports he or she needs to meet our common, high expectations by investing:

  • $13.9 billion in Evidence-Based Funding
  • $493.7 million in Early Childhood Education
  • $25.8 million in Alternative Education

Quality – Recognize and nurture the strengths each student brings to the classroom and provide diverse pathways to success by investing:

  • $6.3 million in District Broadband Expansion
  • $2.2 million in the Competency-Based Education Pilot
  • $3 million in Advanced Placement Expansion

Community – Bridge services to meet the needs of the whole child by investing:

  • $15 million in the Healthy Community Incentive Fund
  • $2.5 million in Parent Mentoring

Educator Recruitment and Recognition – Expand and diversify the pipeline for recruitment and retain Illinois' current teachers by investing:

  • $2 million in Teacher Mentoring
  • $1 million in Principal Mentoring
  • $1 million in National Board Certification
  • $700,000 in Diverse Educator Recruitment
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11941/17/2018
  

​Lack of state budget for two years significantly delayed timeline for implementing and scoring new assessment

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the school-, district-, and state-level aggregate scores for the 2016 Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/ISA.

NoNo
2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the school-, district-, and state-level aggregate scores for the 2016 Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) on the ISBE website at www.isbe.net/ISA.

Overall, the statewide 2016 ISA results reflect a solid mastery of science in the “all students” groups in the fifth and eighth grades. Results are lower on the high school assessment. The results also show performance differences across student demographic groups similar to those on assessments in reading and mathematics, although performance in science is higher in general across the board.

The task of creating and implementing a federally required test in six months, in combination with the lack of a state budget for more than two years, greatly impacted the timeline for administering, scoring, and reporting the 2016 ISA. The lack of a state budget impeded ISBE’s ability to enter into contracts with vendors both to create and to score the test. Some schools and districts encountered administration obstacles that prohibited them from administering the 2016 ISA despite their dedication. Low participation rates in some schools and districts should not be interpreted as a lack of effort or diligence on their part.

“A high-quality science education equips students with skills such as inquiry and collaboration that are necessary for all careers, including those in STEM fields,” said State Superintendent Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Illinois is ahead of the curve in including science in our balanced accountability indicators. We sincerely appreciate Illinois’ educators and administrators for helping to make each year of the science assessment more successful than the last. While the timeline for releasing the scores has been unacceptable, we have received positive feedback on the test itself. Illinois is rich in educators with expertise and commitment to building the highest-quality science assessment possible. These experiences serve as a foundation from which Illinois can innovate in collaboration with practitioners in the field. ISBE and our partners will continue to improve the ISA testing platform and ultimately ensure all students build a comprehensive understanding of science.”

The ISA was designed to reflect classroom experiences. The ISA pushes students to apply their knowledge when they give answers, thus better preparing students for postsecondary and a career. The ISA aligns to the Illinois Learning Standards for science, which incorporate the national Next Generation Science Standards.

The test is untimed, but designed to take approximately one hour. Each student’s score between 200 and 400 correlates to one of two performance levels: Proficient or Not Proficient. The ISA yields data to help administrators and educators make broad adjustments to curriculum and instruction over time to better align with state standards. The results are not intended to support teaching decisions for individual students. The ISA also helps families understand how well their children are performing academically in science.

One year of results cannot fully explain the differences in performance at the different grade levels on the 2016 assessment. However, possible contributing factors could include systemic challenges moving to an integrated, standards-aligned curriculum at the high school level; the increased complexity of the analysis and synthesis required for students to solve problems at the high school level; possible differences in the tested pool of students; and the impact of known technical issues with the administration of the assessment.

ISBE worked with school districts in the time between the 2016 and 2017 ISA administrations to address technology issues, as well as improve the testing platform. The preliminary participation rate for the 2017 ISA shows a significant statewide increase from 93.1 percent to 95.9 percent. ISBE anticipates completing the scoring process for the 2017 ISA in time to release the results in February. Additional improvements are planned for the 2018 administration.

Neither the 2016 nor the 2017 ISA results will count toward accountability for schools and districts. The percentage of students scoring in the Proficient performance level will contribute 5 percent of each school and district’s balanced accountability rating beginning with the 2020 administration.

An FAQ with additional information about the ISA, the performance levels, and the process for scoring the assessment is available at www.isbe.net/Documents/2016-ISA-Results-FAQ.pdf.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11921/12/2018
  

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) meeting scheduled for 10:30 a.m. January 17 has changed to a video conference in Springfield and Chicago. 

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2018

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) meeting scheduled for 10:30 a.m. January 17 has changed to a video conference in Springfield and Chicago. 

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
January 17, 2018
10:30 a.m.

Chicago Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
                               100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location: ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
                                    100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Resolutions and Recognition
    1. Burroughs Award Presentation
  4. Presentations and Updates
    1. Student Advisory Council Update
    2. ESSA School Quality and Student Success Indicator Updates
      1. P-2 Indicator
      2. Elementary and Middle Level Indicator
      3. College and Career Readiness Indicator
  5. FY19 Budget Discussion​
  6. ​​Closed Session (as needed)
  7. ​Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. ​*Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: December 13, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 203 (Low-Income Students Funds Plan)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 100 (Requirements for Accounting, Budgeting, Financial Reporting, and Auditing)
      2. Part 375 (Student Records)
      3. Part 425 (Voluntary Registration and Recognition of Nonpublic Schools)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Contract Amendment for EMC Equipment, Maintenance, Support, and Services
      2. Amendment to the FY 2018 Agreement with UChicago Impact
    End of Consent Agenda
  8. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. ESSA Update
    4. Other Items for Discussion
  9. FY19 Budget Recommendation
  10. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report
    3. ESSA Update
    4. Member Reports
  11. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports​
  12. Adjourn
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11911/8/2018
  

​Ricky Castro will join other state teachers of the year on the field prior to the game on Monday, Jan. 8

​Ricardo "Ricky" Castro, the 2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year, will be recognized at the College Football Playoff National Championship on Monday, Jan. 8, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga. Castro will join other state teachers of the year on the field prior to the national anthem for a celebration of the most influential teachers in the country. The live televised honor is part of the College Football Playoff (CFP) Foundation’s weekend-long Teacher of the Year Championship Experience, hosted in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers’ (CCSSO) National Teacher of the Year Program and presented by Dr Pepper.

NoNo
2018

​SPRINGFIELD – Ricardo "Ricky" Castro, the 2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year, will be recognized at the College Football Playoff National Championship on Monday, Jan. 8, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga. Castro will join other state teachers of the year on the field prior to the national anthem for a celebration of the most influential teachers in the country. The live televised honor is part of the College Football Playoff (CFP) Foundation's weekend-long Teacher of the Year Championship Experience, hosted in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers' (CCSSO) National Teacher of the Year Program and presented by Dr Pepper. 

Castro and other state teachers of the year will be honored guests at CFP Foundation events throughout the weekend leading up to the national championship game on Monday. The presentation on the field will be the pinnacle of the weekend, utilizing college football's largest stage to showcase the nation's top teachers. This is the second year of CCSSO's partnership with the CFP Foundation. 

“I want to thank the College Football Playoff Foundation, Dr Pepper, and CCSSO for recognizing Ricky and the other state teachers of the year as the superstars they are," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “This is an incredible honor for incredibly deserving educators. I'm inspired to see the platform of the National Championship used to highlight excellent educators, especially as the state works to grow the number of diverse young people becoming teachers." 

WHAT:

​2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year Ricardo "Ricky" Castro to be recognized on the field at the College Football Playoff National Championship

WHO:

2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year Ricardo "Ricky" Castro and other state teachers of th​e year

WHEN:

Monday, Jan. 8; Castro to receive recognition prior to the game beginning at 7 p.m.

WHERE:​Televised live on ESPN from Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga.


External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
119012/19/2017
  

​21st Century Community Learning Centers grants improve student achievement through enrichment and family engagement

​The Illinois State Board of Education has released the fiscal year 2019 request for proposals (RFP) for 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) grants. Approximately $12 million in federal funds is available for academically focused afterschool programs to serve students in schools with a high concentration of low-income students.

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2017

​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has released the fiscal year 2019 request for proposals (RFP) for 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) grants. Approximately $12 million in federal funds is available for academically focused afterschool programs to serve students in schools with a high concentration of low-income students. 

“The 21st Century Community Learning Centers support the whole child," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “These enrichment activities help students engage in their learning in new and different ways. Students having a safe place to explore and learn outside of school hours also provides a tremendous benefit to families and communities." 

Existing 21st CCLC programs provide students with art; music; character building; physical education; and supplementary math, English, and science activities outside of regular school hours. The 21st CCLC programs also connect students' families with literacy and computer training and other educational services. 

Teachers report improved behavior, motivation to learn, and academic performance among students who participate in 21st CCLC programs. Among participating elementary school students, 63 percent improved in behavior and motivation to learn, 30.7 percent improved in reading ability, and 26.2 percent improved in mathematics ability, according to teachers surveyed for the 21st CCLC Annual Performance Report for the 2013 cohort of grants. Among middle and high school students, 55 percent improved in behavior, 53 percent improved in motivation to learn, 29.7 percent improved in reading, and 27.1 improved in mathematics. 

Proposals that have the following components will receive Competitive Priority points:

  1. Programs that serve the state's lowest-performing schools (identified as Priority) and are submitted as a joint application between at least one Local Education Agency (LEA) receiving funds under Title I, Part A and at least one public or private community organization;
  2. Programs that serve eligible middle schools or high schools and are submitted as a joint application between at least one LEA receiving funds under Title I, Part A and at least one public or private community organization (“eligible schools" as indicated in the “Population to be Served" section of the RFP); and
  3. Propose to serve students who attend 40 percent or higher low-income rural schools and at least one public or private community organization. 

Interested parties may access the RFP and find additional information at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/21st-Century-Community-Learning-Centers.aspx. Proposals are due by 4 p.m. on Feb. 15, 2018.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118912/18/2017
  

​State Board encourages districts to apply now for funds to expand broadband capabilities

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has released a notice of funding opportunity/request for proposals (NOFO/RFP) for pending state funds to expand internet connectivity in schools. The funds would reimburse school districts for the cost of upgrading their broadband infrastructure to fiber optic technology. 

NoNo
2017

​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has released a notice of funding opportunity/request for proposals (NOFO/RFP) for pending state funds to expand internet connectivity in schools. The funds would reimburse school districts for the cost of upgrading their broadband infrastructure to fiber optic technology.

Nearly 90,000 students in 106 school districts in Illinois do not have bandwidth sufficient to engage in digital learning, according to estimates provided by the national nonprofit organization EducationSuperHighway. Fiber optic technology delivers the most affordable and fastest network speeds to schools and allows districts to scale cost-effectively to meet growing bandwidth needs in the future.

“A quality education today absolutely includes high-speed internet access," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We need to cultivate a skilled workforce for Illinois to attract businesses and compete in the global economy. The one-time cost of upgrading to fiber opens up limitless opportunities to use free online resources, teach coding, and integrate technology across the curriculum. The state's investment today is essential to preparing all students for the jobs of tomorrow and fueling our growth as a state."

The Illinois Classroom Connectivity Initiative works with school districts across the state to accelerate bandwidth upgrades through a partnership with state agencies and EducationSuperHighway. The initiative has helped 756 Illinois school districts, which educate more than 1.2 million students, meet the 100 kbps per student minimum connectivity goal. EducationSuperHighway connects districts to competitive service provider options and helps districts take advantage of the discounts offered through the Federal Communications Commission's E-rate program. School districts can contact EducationSuperHighway for free support and consultation. The Learning Technology Centers of Illinois also provide districts with free workshops and support for E-Rate applications. 

In addition to discounts ranging from 20 to 90 percent of the costs of internet installation, the E-rate program provides federal funds to match up to 10 percent of districts' total fiber optic construction costs – if Illinois provides matching state funds. ISBE intends to include a request for $6.3 million in its FY 2019 budget recommendations to the General Assembly in January for state matching funds to enable Illinois school districts to capture these unprecedented federal funds, which are only available through 2018. 

Illinois' eligibility depends on fiscal year 2019 appropriations from the General Assembly, but districts must apply now for the pending state funds to ensure adequate time for both the state and federal applications. Responses to the NOFO/RFP must be received in the ISBE offices no later than 3 p.m. Feb. 9, 2018. School districts can access the NOFO/RFP on the Broadband Information page on the ISBE website. Districts submitting proposals will also need to complete FCC Form 470 by the early spring deadline and provide documentation of eligibility for the federal match in their FCC Form 471.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118812/15/2017
  

New Public Inquiry process facilitates fair and transparent fact-finding

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today launched the state’s first-ever Public Inquiry to examine the special education procedures and services in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The new Public Inquiry process will facilitate fair and transparent fact-finding on a matter of public concern. Special education advocates, parents, and teachers shared their concerns regarding perceived systemic problems with the delivery of special education services in CPS at the Nov. 17, 2017, State Board of Education meeting.

NoNo
2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today launched the state’s first-ever Public Inquiry to examine the special education procedures and services in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The new Public Inquiry process will facilitate fair and transparent fact-finding on a matter of public concern. Special education advocates, parents, and teachers shared their concerns regarding perceived systemic problems with the delivery of special education services in CPS at the Nov. 17, 2017, State Board of Education meeting.

“ISBE is convening the Public Inquiry to address the central question of whether there is a policy environment in CPS preventing students from being served,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The framework of the new Public Inquiry will allow ISBE to examine the issues in the most objective and transparent way possible and to keep the focus on students. The goal is not to reach a resolution, but to come to a true and trustworthy understanding of how special education services are being delivered in the district.”

The Office of the General Counsel at ISBE will lead the Public Inquiry team, consisting additionally of a special education law expert, who will facilitate the Public Inquiry, and a representative from the special education advocacy community. The Public Inquiry team will examine systemic issues only. Specific parent and student complaints will follow the established Special Education Complaint Process.

“Our first use of this Public Inquiry framework will be a learning opportunity,” said ISBE General Counsel Stephanie Jones. “We have structured the process to be child-centered, specific, fair, and transparent. The Public Inquiry may provide a model for handling future matters of public concern, in which families and advocates come to ISBE with evidence of systemic problems in a local education system.”

The Public Inquiry team will gather facts related to the identified issues by collecting documents and holding a series of public hearings involving both written and oral testimony from CPS and from experts and families. ISBE will post all documents, testimony, and recordings of the hearings on the ISBE website after redacting private student information in accordance with federal law.

The Public Inquiry team will provide a report to the ISBE general counsel to present to the State Board by the April 2018 Board meeting.

ISBE has an obligation to ensure the systems and procedures school districts implement provide a free and appropriate public education to all students requiring special education services. ISBE has the authority and an obligation under state and federal law to thoroughly review and guide the resolution of these matters.   

Learn more about the Public Inquiry at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/OfficeGeneralCounsel.aspx.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
118712/8/2017
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. December 13 in Springfield.

NoNo
2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting at 10:30 a.m. December 13 in Springfield.

View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
December 13, 2017
10:30 a.m.

100 N. First St., Springfield

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Resolutions and Recognition
    1. Illinois Teacher of the Year
  4. Presentations and Updates
    1. FY 19 Budget Development
      1. FY 19 Revenue Projections: Dan Long and Jim Muschinske, COGFA
      2. FY 19 Budget Development: Robert Wolfe, CFO
    2. IARSS Teacher Shortage Survey Results
  5. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: November 17, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
      2. Part 25 (Educator Licensure)
      3. Part 33 (Programs for the Preparation of Superintendents in Illinois)
      4. Part 252 (Driver Education)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 401 (Special Education Facilities under Section 14-7.02 of the School Code)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Release of Migrant Education Program Request for Proposals
      2. Release of Migrant Education Coordination RFSP
      3. Advanced Placement Test Fee Program
      4. Approval of the Release of the Fiscal Year 2019 Broadband Expansion RFP
      5. Grant Accountability and Transparency Act Information Technology RFSP
      6. Student Information Systems Technology Support RFSP
    5. *Draft Annual Report
    6. End of Consent Agenda
    7. Illinois Charter School Commission Appointments
    8. Cut Score Recommendations for Redeveloped Licensure Tests
    9. Common Career Pathways Definition and Guidance
  6. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. ESSA Update
    4. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports
    2. Rulemaking Anticipated for FY 19
  9. Closed Session (as needed)
  10. Adjourn
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
118611/30/2017
  

​Applications now open for second cohort of competency-based education pilot

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the request for applications for the second cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. School districts participating in the pilot will replace select high school graduation course requirements with a competency-based system of the district’s design.

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2017

​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the request for applications for the second cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. School districts participating in the pilot will replace select high school graduation course requirements with a competency-based system of the district's design.

Competency-based teaching and learning structures students' educational experience around the individual student's knowledge and interests, rather than seat time. In competency-based learning, students play the active role in determining the course of their education. Students advance as they demonstrate mastery of specific skills, abilities, and knowledge.

“This competency-based learning pilot might be the most exciting opportunity available to school districts right now," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “This pilot allows districts to redesign the high school experience totally around what students know and where they want to go. Competency-based learning recognizes students' individual starting points and allows them to pave a personalized pathway with no ceiling. I am excited about the innovations of the first cohort and ready to welcome a second cohort of pioneering districts." 

All Illinois school districts serving grades 9 through 12 are eligible to apply to participate in the pilot. Districts interested in applying may access the application at www.isbe.net/competency. Applications are due to ISBE by February 16, 2018.

The ISBE website contains a library of research, program implementation plans, and descriptions of current pilot districts at https://www.isbe.net/competency.

Illinois Public Act 99-0674 (the “Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act"), passed unanimously by both legislative houses and signed into law by Governor Bruce Rauner on July 29, 2016, established the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program as one of a number of strategies to prepare more students for meaningful career opportunities. ISBE consulted with the Illinois Community College Board, Illinois Board of Higher Education, representatives from higher education, and national experts in developing the pilot. 

The first cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program launched with 10 participating school districts in the spring of 2017. The 10 districts convened in September to study national best practices, build relationships, find points of connection, and begin moving their pilots from vision to action. 

Currently, no additional state funding is appropriated for participating pilot districts.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118511/20/2017
  

​Annual Thomas Lay Burroughs Award recognizes extraordinary local leadership

​ Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) board member Ruth Cross on Sunday presented Gregory Ignoffo of Leyden Community High School District 212 with the 2017 Thomas Lay Burroughs Award for the State's Outstanding School Board President. Ignoffo has been a member of the Leyden CHSD 212 School Board for 18 years, serving as its president for 12 years. 

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2017
SPRINGFIELD – Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) board member Ruth Cross on Sunday presented Gregory Ignoffo of Leyden Community High School District 212 with the 2017 Thomas Lay Burroughs Award for the State's Outstanding School Board President. Ignoffo has been a member of the Leyden CHSD 212 School Board for 18 years, serving as its president for 12 years. 

ISBE created the Burroughs Award in 1991 in memory of the late ISBE Chairman Thomas Lay Burroughs. The award recognizes extraordinary local leadership, in particular in advancing student learning and educational excellence, expanding equal educational opportunities, and resolving major crises or difficulties. ISBE presents the award each November in Chicago at the Joint Annual Conference of the Illinois Association of School Boards, Illinois Association of School Administrators, and Illinois Association of School Business Officials.

“Greg Ignoffo leads for the whole child, whole school, and whole community,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “He makes sure every student in his district receives what they need to prepare for college and career, whether that’s a computer, academic coaching, or the personal attention of a mentor. Greg clearly believes in his students as the engines powering a healthy and thriving future for his community.”  

Under Ignoffo’s leadership, Leyden CHSD 212 became one of the first three school districts in the country to implement Google Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education (now G Suite) in a one-to-one technology environment. The initiative secured a device for every student, but not all students had internet access in their homes. Ignoffo partnered with Sprint’s ConnectEd Initiative to secure free WiFi hotspots for all students in need and worked with his board to require that all new school buses purchased have WiFi, ensuring equitable access to digital learning for all students. 

“Every superintendent should have the good fortune of having a board president like Greg Ignoffo,” said former Leyden CHSD 212 Superintendent Dr. Kathryn Robbins. “A gifted communicator, listener, and decision-maker, Greg is generous with his time and expertise and has been instrumental in Leyden’s numerous successes through the years. He ensures that every student has the support, resources, and opportunity to pursue his or her passion, and he is enormously proud of their accomplishments.”

Nearly two-thirds of ninth-grade students enter Leyden CHSD 212 unprepared for the academic challenges of high school, according to Ignoffo’s nomination packet. Ignoffo led his board in working with the district’s administration and staff to devise and implement academic and social/emotional supports. The district’s student achievement and graduation rates have been rising, thanks to initiatives such as the Freshman Academy, a program for incoming ninth-grade students at risk of falling behind; a daily mentoring program; online credit recovery; and a summer program to help students succeed in taking Advanced Placement courses the following year. 

“Greg Ignoffo is a perfect example of what the leader of a high school board should be,” said Rosemont Mayor Brad Stephens. “He shows tremendous skills in conflict resolution as well as being a sincere local leader. When Greg asks, ‘What's best for our students?’ he truly means it and will stop at nothing to make sure that is the most important issue when making a decision.”

Ignoffo made stakeholder feedback and community engagement a priority in developing the plan for the $80 million renovation project for two high schools, including one nearly 100 years old. The renovations will include a new daycare and preschool facility that will provide a local daycare option for families and double as a learning lab for students to earn industry child care credentials.

Leyden CHSD 212’s numerous awards and distinctions demonstrate Ignoffo’s continuous pursuit of improvement and excellence in serving students. Leyden CHSD 212 recently received prestigious AdvancED District Accreditation (2010, 2015), College Board National Advanced Placement District of the Year (2014), Chicago Tribune Top 100 Workplaces (2015, 2016, 2017), National School Board Association Magna Award (2015), Digital Content and Curriculum Award - Center for Digital Education (2014), and District of Distinction - District Administration Magazine (2015).
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118411/14/2017
  

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will hold its regular business meeting at 9:30 a.m. Nov. 17 in Chicago.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will hold its regular business meeting at 9:30 a.m. Nov. 17 in Chicago.

The meeting will be in Conference Room 16-503 at the Thompson Center. ISBE will host its third and final public budget hearing in the same room immediately following the board meeting (at approximately 11 a.m.). Public participation in the budget hearing by teachers, parents, leaders, and advocates helps ISBE communicate the real needs of Illinois' students to the General Assembly. ISBE will issue fiscal year 2019 budget recommendations on behalf of pre-K through 12th grade educational service providers statewide to the General Assembly in January.   

View the agenda for the board meeting below. View the packet for the board meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting
November 17, 2017
9:30 a.m.

Thompson Center
100 W. Randolph, Conference Room 16-503

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Closed Session
  4. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: October 18, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 27 (Standards for Endorsements in Specific Teaching Fields)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 650 (Charter Schools)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Request to Increase
      2. Early Childhood Grant Prevention Initiative Training and Technical Assistance: Birth to 3 Years Grant
      End of Consent Agenda
    5. Appeal for Institution Recognition for American Intercontinental University
  5. AFSCME Contract
  6. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. ESSA Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports
  9. Adjourn

ISBE will host a public budget hearing in Conference Room 16-503 at the Thompson Center in Chicago immediately following the board meeting (at approximately 11 a.m.). ISBE encourages teachers, parents, leaders, and advocates to share their stories and budget requests to inform ISBE's fiscal year 2019 budget advocacy. All individuals – including those attending a hearing in person – should submit their comments and stories by completing a budget request form (available at http://www.isbe.net/budget) and emailing the form to isbeFY19@isbe.net.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
118311/3/2017
  

School-, district-, and state-level data available at www.illinoisreportcard.com​

​The 2017 Interactive Illinois Report Card launched today at www.illinoisreportcard.com. The annual Illinois Report Card shows the performance and progress of schools, districts, and the state overall on a wide range of educational metrics. The Data Quality Campaign and the Education Commission of the States have praised the Illinois Report Card as comprehensive and easy to understand.

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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The 2017 Interactive Illinois Report Card launched today at www.illinoisreportcard.com. The annual Illinois Report Card shows the performance and progress of schools, districts, and the state overall on a wide range of educational metrics. The Data Quality Campaign and the Education Commission of the States have praised the Illinois Report Card as comprehensive and easy to understand.

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) originally published the data on Oct. 31 on the Classic Report Card site. The data have not changed, as the data verification window closed prior to the PDF report cards publishing on Oct. 31. 

Find additional data and information, including an assessments-only spreadsheet for all schools and districts, a glossary of Report Card terms, a FAQ, and a link to the Classic Report Card site at www.isbe.net/ilreportcarddata.

State-level data on the 2017 Illinois Report Card show students achieved gains in a number of indicators from the 2015-16 school year to the 2016-17 school year. Student outcomes improved in English language arts achievement on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment, the four-year graduation rate, college enrollment rates, Advanced Placement participation and success, the community college remediation rate, ninth-grade students on track to graduate, and eighth-grade students passing Algebra I.   

For state-level highlights and quotes from Illinois State Superintendent of Education, please see ISBE’s Oct. 31 press release on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Lists/News/NewsDisplay.aspx?ID=1182​.
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118210/31/2017
  

Students and educators achieved growth under extreme financial uncertainty

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the 2017 Illinois Report Card at http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx. The annual Illinois Report Card shows the performance and progress of schools, districts, and the state overall on a wide range of educational metrics. The www.illinoisreportcard.com interactive website will go live on Friday, Nov. 3. The Data Quality Campaign and the Education Commission of the States have praised the Illinois Report Card as comprehensive and easy to understand.

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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the 2017 Illinois Report Card at http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx. The annual Illinois Report Card shows the performance and progress of schools, districts, and the state overall on a wide range of educational metrics. The www.illinoisreportcard.com interactive website will go live on Friday, Nov. 3. The Data Quality Campaign and the Education Commission of the States have praised the Illinois Report Card as comprehensive and easy to understand.

State-level data on the 2017 Illinois Report Card show students achieved gains in a number of indicators from the 2015-16 school year to the 2016-17 school year. Student outcomes improved in English language arts achievement on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment, the four-year graduation rate, college enrollment rates, Advanced Placement participation and success, the community college remediation rate, ninth-grade students on track to graduate, and eighth-grade students passing Algebra I.   

“The 2017 Illinois Report Card demonstrates our students’ and educators’ tremendous capacity for growth,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We are making real progress. Our educators and educational leaders are diving into the data to uncover what’s working and to identify new strategies and partnerships to support the whole child. At the Those Who Excel banquet on Saturday, I had the opportunity to honor hundreds of extraordinary educators who are doing exceptional work. We have so much talent in our state. We need to accelerate the growth we’re seeing by facilitating connections and knowledge-sharing between schools and districts. 

“The strengths and opportunities apparent in the data show that our balanced accountability system is looking at the right measures. Educators know how students’ attendance and success at critical transition points like the third grade, the ninth grade, and the first year of college strongly correlate to future success. Accountability starts with focusing on the numbers that matter for students. Illinois’ Every Student Succeeds Act Plan uses data and local context to drive appreciative inquiry and inform more holistic supports. 

“Illinois’ educators and students worked incredibly hard under extreme financial uncertainty. Their passion and dedication is clear. The state is committed to exploring new ways to attract highly qualified and diverse professionals to answer the call to teach. With more equitable funding and our Illinois ESSA Plan in place, I believe we are on the right path to create the conditions for students to thrive.” 

The 2017 Illinois Report Card includes data for the first statewide administration of the SAT. All 11th-grade students took the SAT in the spring of 2017 as both a free college entrance exam and Illinois’ high school accountability assessment for math and English language arts. 

The new Illinois SAT Performance Levels, determined through an educator-led process, show how well Illinois students know the Illinois Learning Standards in math and English language arts. The four levels (Exceeds Standards, Meets Standards, Approaching Standards, and Partially Meets Standards) indicate different levels of mastery of the Illinois Learning Standards. Illinois educators use the Illinois SAT Performance Levels to see how well their curriculum and instruction align to the state’s learning standards. The Illinois Learning Standards and the Illinois SAT Performance Levels are intentionally rigorous to further the goal of reducing the number of graduates who need to take remedial courses in college.

State-level highlights from the 2017 Illinois Report Card include:

Academic achievement:

  • The spring 2017 statewide administration of the SAT established Illinois’ new baseline for high school student achievement: 39.8 percent of 11th-grade students achieved proficiency in English language arts and 36.4 percent achieved proficiency in math. Students will continue to have access to free, supplemental, online resources from Kahn Academy to improve their mastery of Illinois Learning Standards assessed by the SAT.
  • The percentage of third- through eighth-grade students meeting or exceeding standards in English language arts on the PARCC assessment increased from 36.5 percent in 2016 to 37 percent in 2017. 
  • The percentage of third- through eighth-grade students meeting or exceeding standards in math on the PARCC assessment decreased from 31.6 percent in 2016 to 31.2 percent in 2017. 

College enrollment and preparation:

  • The four-year high school graduation rate increased from 85.5 percent to 87 percent. 
  • The percentage of students enrolled in college 12 months after graduating also increased from 67.8 percent to 69.5 percent. 
  • The percentage of students enrolled in college 16 months after graduating increased from 71.4 percent to 73.2 percent. 
  • The percentage of Illinois public high school graduates enrolled in Illinois community colleges taking remedial courses improved from 49.4 percent for the class of 2015 graduates to 46.8 percent for the class of 2016 graduates.
  • The number of students in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades taking advanced course work (Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and dual credit courses) increased from 154,290 in 2016 to 160,657 in 2017.
  • The number of students in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades taking Advanced Placement courses increased from 112,156 in 2016 to 116,505 in 2017.
  • The number of Advanced Placement exams taken by the 12th-grade class at any point during high school increased from 155,180 in 2016 to 167,009 in 2017.
  • The percent of Advanced Placement exams passed remained stable, increasing slightly from 65.9 percent in 2016 to 66.4 percent in 2017 of all exams taken by the 12th-grade class.
  • The number of students in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades taking International Baccalaureate courses increased from 4,466 in 2016 to 9,988 in 2017.

Student success:

  • The percentage of ninth-grade students on track to graduate increased from 82.4 percent in 2016 to 87.1 percent in 2017.
  • The number of eighth-grade students passing Algebra I increased from 28.4 percent in 2016 to 29.5 percent in 2017.
  • Concern: The rate of chronic truancy increased from 9.8 percent in 2016 to 10.8 percent in 2017. Chronic truancy measures the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse.

Educator workforce:

  • The teacher retention rate increased from 85.8 percent in 2016 to 86.3 percent in 2017. 
  • The principal turnover remained stable, increasing slightly from 1.9 principals at the same school in six years in 2016 to two principals in 2017. 
  • Overall teacher diversity remained mostly unchanged. In the 2016-17 school year, 83.3 percent of Illinois teachers were White, compared to 48.5 percent of Illinois students.
  • The average teacher salary increased by $1,066 from $63,450 in 2016 to $64,516 in 2017.
  • The average administrator salary increased by $2,639 from $103,634 in 2016 to $106,273 in 2017.

Additional data and information, including a glossary of Report Card terms and FAQ, are available at www.isbe.net/ilreportcarddata​.
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118110/28/2017
  

​State Board of Education honors top Illinois teacher and 234 other educational leaders at annual Those Who Excel banquet 

The Illinois State Board of Education named Lindsey Jensen the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year on Oct. 28 at the 42nd annual Those Who Excel/Illinois Teacher of the Year banquet in Normal. Jensen teaches English, including Advanced Placement English, Shakespeare, American literature, drama, and composition, for 11th- and 12th-grade students at Dwight Township High School in Dwight Public Schools District 230. 

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2017
Normal — The Illinois State Board of Education named Lindsey Jensen the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year on Oct. 28 at the 43rd annual Those Who Excel/Illinois Teacher of the Year banquet in Normal. Jensen teaches English, including Advanced Placement English, Shakespeare, American literature, drama, and composition, for 11th- and 12th-grade students at Dwight Township High School in Dwight Public Schools District 230. 

ISBE honored a total of 235 classroom teachers, educational leaders, and support personnel at the banquet at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center.

“Lindsey Jensen exemplifies teacher leadership,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Leadership to me means taking responsibility for things you care about. Lindsey Jensen does just that. Students leave her classroom with an expanded understanding of their own potential. We are privileged to have this extraordinary educator represent the state as our 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year.” 

Colleagues and students described Jensen as infusing the best of research-based instructional practices with high expectations and infectious positivity. Jensen’s many contributions to her school community include helping to redesign the English curriculum and organizing students and faculty in philanthropic events to raise thousands of dollars for the Special Olympics. Jensen also supervises student teachers, coaches her colleagues, volunteers as an adviser for students’ extracurricular clubs and activities, and serves her professional association.

“I believe education equals empowerment,” said Jensen. “Teachers are in the business of human beings, and teaching requires becoming part of students’ lives and making connections that no other professional experiences.” 

Jensen’s teaching career began 12 years ago as a teacher’s aide in a junior high behavioral disorder classroom. Jensen, now in her ninth year as a high school English teacher, still calls upon her special education experience. Jensen presents content in different ways – including through singing – and gives students the opportunity to show what they know in different formats. 

“Her teaching style goes beyond wanting students to earn good grades in her classes,” said Dwight Township High School student Rebecca Ruder, who submitted a letter in support of Jensen’s nomination for Teacher of the Year. “She wants her students to really understand the material and leave the course being proud of what they have learned and the literature they have produced.”

Jensen received a Bachelor of Science in speech communication from Southern Illinois University and a Master of Arts in teaching in secondary education from Oakland City University. She is earning her doctorate in teaching and learning from Illinois State University. 

“Lindsey is more than a teacher of English – she is a teacher of people,” said Erik Borne, a fellow educator at Dwight Township High School who submitted a letter in support of Jensen’s nomination for Teacher of the Year. “[Her students] know she is truly concerned not only about their academic success but also their emotional and social well-being. She inspires her students to want to be their best, and as someone who has been teaching almost 20 years, I can honestly say that I have had no colleague inspire me more than she.” 

As Illinois Teacher of the Year, Jensen will have an opportunity to share her knowledge and expertise outside the classroom. Jensen will be available beginning in the spring of 2018 to speak at teaching workshops, education conferences, and community meetings. Jensen will represent Illinois at the NASA Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., and the National Teacher of the Year program sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers in partnership with Voya Financial. 

A photograph of the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year Lindsey Jensen is available for download online at https://www.isbe.net/PublishingImages/TOY_Lindsey_Jensen.jpg​.



External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBADIGER ASHWINI
117910/13/2017
  

Public hearings on the budget scheduled in Springfield, Chicago, and Mount Vernon

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a call for budget requests to inform ISBE's fiscal year 2019 budget recommendations for pre-K through 12th grade educational service providers statewide. ISBE will host public budget hearings in Springfield, Chicago, and Mount Vernon to hear in person from educators, parents, families, and community and business leaders about the programmatic and financial needs of Illinois' public schools. All individuals – including those attending a hearing in person – should submit their comments and stories by completing a budget request form (available at http://www.isbe.net/budget) and emailing the form to isbeFY19@isbe.net

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2017

​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a call for budget requests to inform ISBE's fiscal year 2019 budget recommendations for pre-K through 12th grade educational service providers statewide. ISBE will host public budget hearings in Springfield, Chicago, and Mount Vernon to hear in person from educators, parents, families, and community and business leaders about the programmatic and financial needs of Illinois' public schools. All individuals – including those attending a hearing in person – should submit their comments and stories by completing a budget request form (available at http://www.isbe.net/budget) and emailing the form to isbeFY19@isbe.net. 

ISBE board member Kevin Settle will host the hearings. ISBE will issue fiscal year 2019 budget recommendations on behalf of pre-K through 12th grade educational service providers statewide to the General Assembly in January. 

“This is not for ISBE's budget as an agency; this is for the financial needs of students and schools statewide," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We encourage teachers, parents, leaders, and advocates to send in requests and to participate in the budget hearings. Your participation in the budget process helps ISBE communicate the real needs of Illinois' students to the General Assembly. We rely on your stories and testimony to advocate for your children and communities." 

The public budget hearings for fiscal year 2019 will take place in:

  • ​Springfield – Wednesday, Oct. 18, immediately following the Board meeting (approximately noon) in the Board Room at ISBE (100 N. First St.)
  • Mount Vernon – Wednesday, Nov. 8, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Dr. Nick Osborne Primary Center (401 North 30th St.)
  • Chicago – Friday, Nov. 17, immediately following the Board meeting in Conference Room 16-503 at the Thompson Center (100 W. Randolph St.) 

ISBE makes its budget recommendations on behalf of students and communities across the state based on the following principles:

  • Alignment to the Board's Goals,
  • Advocacy for the needs of children across the state as identified from requests from the field, and
  • Recognition of the need for universal and differentiated support to meet the unique needs of each and every child in the State of Illinois in a public system. 

Find information on past budgets at http://www.isbe.net/budget.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
118010/13/2017
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago on October 18.

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2017

Agenda announced for Illinois State Board of Education meeting October 18 via video conference

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in Springfield and Chicago on October 18.

ISBE will host a public budget hearing in the Board Room in Springfield (100 N. First St.) immediately following the meeting (at approximately noon). Public participation in the budget hearing by teachers, parents, leaders, and advocates helps ISBE communicate the real needs of Illinois' students to the General Assembly. ISBE will issue fiscal year 2019 budget recommendations on behalf of pre-K through 12th grade educational service providers statewide to the General Assembly in January.   

View the packet for the meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

State Board of Education Meeting

October 18, 2017

9 a.m.

 

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Resolution Honoring Nell Wiseman
  4. Presentations and Updates
    1. P-2 Indicator Subcommittee Update
  5. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: September 13-14, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 100 (Requirements for Accounting, Budgeting, Financial Reporting, and Auditing)
      2. Part 375 (Student Records)
      3. Part 425 (Voluntary Registration and Recognition of Nonpublic Schools)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Request for Proposals Early Childhood Block Grant – Prevention Initiative 0-3, Preschool for All 3-5, and Preschool for All Expansion 3-5
      2. Request for Proposals for the 21st Century Community Learning Center Grants
      3. Healthy Community Investment Grants
      4. Amended Contract for American Institutes for Research (AIR)
      End of Consent Agenda
    4. SAT School Day Performance Levels and Threshold Scores
    5. Qualified Zone Academy Bond Remaining Authorizations from 2015 Allocation
    6. New Waiver Procedures
  6. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. ESSA Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)  
  9. Closed Session (as needed)
  10. Adjourn

ISBE will host a public budget hearing in the Board Room in Springfield (100 N. First St.) immediately following the meeting (at approximately noon). ISBE encourages teachers, parents, leaders, and advocates to share their stories and budget requests to inform ISBE's fiscal year 2019 budget advocacy. All individuals – including those attending a hearing in person – should submit their comments and stories by completing a budget request form (available at https://www.isbe.net/budget) and emailing the form to isbeFY19@isbe.net.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
117810/11/2017
  

State Board to name 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year at annual banquet for top educators Oct. 28​

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced today the statewide recipients of the 2017-18 Those Who Excel awards. The Those Who Excel awards honor outstanding classroom teachers, educational leaders, and support personnel for their invaluable contributions to their schools and communities.  

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2017
NORMALThe Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced today the statewide recipients of the 2017-18 Those Who Excel awards. The Those Who Excel awards honor outstanding classroom teachers, educational leaders, and support personnel for their invaluable contributions to their schools and communities.  


State education officials will honor 235 outstanding Illinois educators at the sold-out 43rd annual Those Who Excel/Teacher of the Year Banquet. Honorees will include the 10 Teacher of the Year finalists, one of whom the State Board will name the top Illinois educator for 2018. Find a complete list of this year's recipients at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/2017-those-who-excel-recipients.pdf

“It's a great time to be an educator in Illinois," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The Those Who Excel award recipients show us how educators can unite communities and change students' lives. These educators showcase the dynamic work happening in schools across Illinois –from the high school principal helping students run their own technology business to the middle school teacher harnessing her own story of fortitude to inspire leadership in her students. Their efforts make the difference for students. I cannot thank our educators and educational leaders enough." 

Local school district leaders and members of school communities nominate candidates for Those Who Excel recognition. A committee of peers, organized by ISBE, chooses the award winners. The committee includes representatives from statewide education organizations, as well as former award winners. 

ISBE will honor the outstanding educators at the banquet on Saturday, Oct. 28, at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center in Normal. The 235 honorees will receive recognition on three levels – Recognition, Merit, and Excellence – and across multiple categories, including classroom teacher, school administrator, and student support personnel. 

The 2018 Teacher of the Year will serve as Illinois' ambassador for the teaching profession during the 2017-18 school year and will represent Illinois in the National Teacher of the Year program sponsored by VOYA Financial. Ricardo “Ricky" Castro, who teaches English as a second language, language arts, and Spanish at Elk Grove High School in Township High School District 214, served as Illinois' 2017 Teacher of the Year and ambassador for teaching during the 2016-17 school year. 

“It has been an honor to share how teachers today are everyday leaders who foster the social development, self-actualization, and academic growth needed to thrive in a diverse democratic country," said Castro. “I have been humbled throughout the year as I have observed the dedication, compassion, and excellence that Illinois teachers continuously display."  

For more information on ISBE's Those Who Excel program, please visit https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Those-who-excel.aspx

External CommunicationsBADIGER ASHWINI
11779/28/2017
  

Selective annual award from U.S. Department of Education recognizes schools for academic excellence

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools, naming 16 Illinois public elementary, middle, and high schools among recipients of the prestigious award. The diverse Illinois schools from 14 different districts have enrollments ranging from 206 to 3,836 students and from 8 percent to 60 percent eligibility for free or reduced-priced meals.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The U.S. Department of Education today announced the 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools, naming 16 Illinois public elementary, middle, and high schools among recipients of the prestigious award. The diverse Illinois schools from 14 different districts have enrollments ranging from 206 to 3,836 students and from 8 percent to 60 percent eligibility for free or reduced-priced meals.

“Congratulations to the leaders, educators, students, families, and staff at our 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “I spend a lot of time visiting schools across the state. The creativity, aspiration, and deep care and commitment I see inspires me. These schools have earned this prestigious award, and the State Board is incredibly proud of their efforts."

Illinois' 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools are:

  • Central Intermediate School (Central SD 51)
  • Charles J. Caruso Middle School (Deerfield SD 109)
  • Copeland Manor Elementary School (Libertyville SD 70)
  • H.H. Conrady Junior High School (North Palos SD 117)
  • Kipling Elementary School (Deerfield SD 109)
  • Lemont High School (Lemont Township HSD 210)
  • Mary Morgan Elementary School (Byron CUSD 226)
  • McClure Junior High School (Western Springs SD 101)
  • Neuqua Valley High School (Indian Prairie SD 204)
  • Olive-Mary Stitt School (Arlington Heights SD 25)
  • Poe Elementary Classical School (City of Chicago SD 299)
  • Prairie Elementary School (Kildeer Countryside SD 96)
  • Rogers Elementary School (Waterloo CUSD 5)
  • Romona Elementary School (Wilmette SD 39)
  • Solomon Elementary School (City of Chicago SD 299)
  • Thomas Dooley Elementary School (Schaumburg CCSD 54)

View photographs and brief descriptions of the 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools.

The U.S. Department of Education began the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program in 1982 to bring public attention to exemplary schools in the United States and to facilitate communication and the sharing of best practices within and among schools. The coveted award affirms the hard work of educators, families, and communities in creating safe and welcoming schools where students master challenging and engaging content.

All 16 of Illinois’ award-winning schools received the “Exemplary High Performing Schools” designation. To qualify, the schools had to achieve in the top 15 percent of all schools in the state when ranked by student performance on the most recently administered English language arts and math state assessments or by student performance on state assessments in combination with other student performance measures, such as attendance and/or graduation rates. The state may nominate a school only once within a five-year period.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will honor the 2017 National Blue Ribbon Schools at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., Nov. 6-7.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11769/27/2017
  

College Board releases non-accountability reports of Advanced Placement, SAT, and PSAT results

The College Board released non-accountability reports of Advanced Placement (AP), SAT, and PSAT results from Illinois students statewide.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The College Board released non-accountability reports of Advanced Placement (AP), SAT, and PSAT results from Illinois students statewide. State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., issued the following statement:

“The Advanced Placement data released by the College Board show increases across the board in the numbers of students taking AP exams and in the percentages of students performing well. The State Board committed to increasing access to AP classes and exams, especially among underrepresented student groups. School teams across the state embraced this goal. The data show what is possible when we commit to equity – to establishing high expectations for all students and to providing all students the different levels of support they need to meet our high expectations.

“The economic and civic success of our state depends on all students from all backgrounds having access to college and being prepared to thrive in college – whether or not they choose college as their next step in life. Many colleges and universities count AP exams as class credit, helping students achieve a degree more affordably and more quickly.

“The PSAT assessments help educators and educational leaders see students' progress during high school and identify students who need greater supports. The State Board is very glad this year to be able to reimburse all schools for one PSAT assessment per student in the ninth and tenth grades during the 2017-18 school year. Students also now have access to free supplemental educational resources through Kahn Academy to help them master the standards assessed by the PSAT and SAT."

The reports released by the College Board include results from the following assessments.

Advanced Placement –Results of students in any grade who enrolled in an AP class and took an AP exam during the 2016-17 school year. The data show:

    • Increases across the board in the numbers of students taking AP exams and the percentages of students performing well (scoring a 3 or higher).
    • Black students make up 17.3 percent of the Illinois student population, but only 8 percent of AP participation.

SAT – Results of students in the 12th grade during the 2016-17 school year who voluntarily took the SAT during the 2015-16 or 2016-17 school year (NOT the results of the spring 2017 statewide SAT accountability assessment administered to students in the 11th grade during the 2016-17 school year). The data show:

  • A performance gap between American Indian, Hispanic, and Black students and their Asian and White peers.
  • A performance gap between students who used fee waivers and students who did not.

PSAT – Results of students in the ninth, 10th, and 11th grades who voluntarily took the PSAT during the 2016-17 school year. The data show:

  • A performance gap between American Indian, Hispanic, and Black students and their Asian and White peers.
  • A performance gap between English Learners and their native English-speaking peers.
  • A dip in the average scores for all student groups, as the number of students taking the PSAT has increased significantly.

View the College Board reports on the ISBE website:

Learn more about the 2017-18 school year PSAT reimbursement on the ISBE website on the PSAT Reimbursement page.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11759/21/2017
  
The council provides the State Board with diverse student perspectives on education issues
Eighteen sophomore, junior, and senior high school students from across Illinois met for the first time as the State Board’s Student Advisory Council (SAC) for the 2017-18 school year. The teens convened at the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) offices in Springfield on Sept. 13 and 14. Members of SAC provide student perspectives on the state’s education issues and have a front-row seat as the State Board formulates policy.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD - Eighteen sophomore, junior, and senior high school students from across Illinois met for the first time as the State Board’s Student Advisory Council (SAC) for the 2017-18 school year. The teens convened at the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) offices in Springfield on Sept. 13 and 14. Members of SAC provide student perspectives on the state’s education issues and have a front-row seat as the State Board formulates policy.

“Feedback from our stakeholders and the field informs all of the State Board’s initiatives and decision-making,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The Student Advisory Council provides ISBE with insights into the priorities and perspectives of Illinois’ students. I hope this opportunity inspires our civic-minded students to continue participating in government and educational leadership beyond high school.”

The 2017-18 SAC includes 12 new members and six returning members. The members of this year’s SAC are:

(*Indicates Returning Student)

Each year, the members of SAC select a topic to research in depth and present to the State Board. In previous years, the SAC has examined mental health resources in schools, best practices for recognizing vocational education, grading scales for school districts, the effects of cyber bullying, the effects of mandatory physical education on high school students and district budgets, and the dropout crisis.

“The members of the Student Advisory Council bring diverse and unique voices to the State Board’s discussions,” said State Board of Education Chairman James T. Meeks. “I look forward to hearing from this year’s new and returning SAC members on ways to better our education system. These young people share a strong work ethic, an ability to think creatively, and a commitment to prioritize the work of the council within their already busy schedules. I encourage every Illinois high school student interested in public service to look into applying for SAC for next year.”

Applicants to the SAC undergo a competitive review process. Those selected exhibit strong interpersonal skills, the ability to work well in groups, think creatively, and come up with innovative solutions to policy challenges. Most have an avid interest in public service and education policy. The State Board reviews dozens of applications each year. The State Board established the SAC in 1975. All sophomores, juniors, and seniors who attend an Illinois public high school are eligible to apply. ISBE will make applications for next year’s SAC (school year 2018-19) available in the spring of 2018.

For more information on SAC, visit the SAC page.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11749/14/2017
  

​Final state-, district-, and school-level results will appear on the Illinois Report Card at the end of October

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the preliminary state-level results for the 2017 Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment. Illinois now has three years of PARCC data and can begin to look for trends and patterns that will help guide instructional and resource decisions to better serve all students. 

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the preliminary state-level results for the 2017 Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment. Illinois now has three years of PARCC data and can begin to look for trends and patterns that will help guide instructional and resource decisions to better serve all students. 

“The preliminary state-level data show that we have built a solid foundation from which to attain equity and excellence for all students," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Illinois educators have achieved a significant accomplishment in embracing the new Illinois Learning Standards, implementing the related instructional shifts, and adapting to the PARCC assessment over the past three years. I am pleased with the work we are committed to doing together to serve Illinois children." 

The data verification process with school districts is ongoing. Final state-, district-, and school-level results will appear on the Illinois Report Card (www.illinoisreportcard.com) at the end of October. The preliminary aggregated data available now may differ from the finalized data on the Illinois Report Card. 

“With the approval of the Illinois ESSA Plan, assessment results are one of many indicators that will inform a system of balanced accountability for all students moving forward," said Smith. “Test scores should never be used as a sole indicator informing school interventions or personnel decisions. A single test will never fully capture the impact of a great teacher or the extraordinary benefits of a great school on a child's development. Data from multiple sources drives our efforts to build the capacity of every school to serve each child fully." 

ISBE will continue to work toward making these data available to educators and school leaders as quickly as possible to improve the timeliness and utility of the assessment results. 

The difference in the solid and patterned bars in the chart below indicate the difference in the nature of the results: 2015 and 2016 results are final, and 2017 results are preliminary.

2017 Preliminary Percentage of Illinois Students Meeting or Exceeding Expectation on PARCC Exams by Grade and Year - ELA

2017 Preliminary Percentage of Illinois Students Meeting or Exceeding Expectation on PARCC Exams by Grade and Year - MATH

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11739/8/2017
  

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education announced the following schedule for its board retreat in Springfield on September 13 and 14.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education announced the following schedule for its board retreat in Springfield on September 13 and 14.   

View the packet for the meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet.

State Board of Education Meeting
100 N. First St., Springfield

September 13, 2017
Noon

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Introduction of 2017-18 Student Advisory Council
  3. Strategic Plan Update
    1. Celebration of Where We Are and Review of Where We've Been, Including Five Key Areas of Focus (Finance System, Quality, Autonomy, Competency, and Community)
    2. Review of Goals in Keeping with ESSA Language and Commitment
    3. Review of Language (Vision, Mission, and Goals) to Ensure Inclusiveness
  4. Every Student Succeeds Act
    1. ECE and the K-2 Indicator
    2. Full-day Kindergarten
    3. College and Career Readiness
    4. IL-EMPOWER

September 14, 2017
8:30 a.m.

AGENDA

  1. Reconvene/Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
  2. Public Participation
  3. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: August 16, 2017
    2. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition, and Supervision)
      2. Part 23 (Standards for School Support Personnel Endorsements)
      3. Part 25 (Educator Licensure)
      4. Part 30 (Programs for the Preparation of Principals in Illinois)
      5. Part 75 (Agriculture Education Program)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Abstinence Education RFP
      2. High School Accountability Assessments Culminating in a College Entrance Exam RFSP
    4. *Waiver and Modification Process
    5. *Fall 2016 Waiver Report
    6. *NASBE Annual Conference Voting Delegate
      End of Consent Agenda
  4. Legislative Agenda for 2017 Veto Session & 2018 Spring Session
  5. Remaining Qualified School Construction Bond Authorization
  6. PARCC Preliminary Statewide Results
  7. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Budget Update
    3. Standards-Setting Methodology for SAT Performance Levels
    4. Other Items for Discussion
  8. Closed Session (as needed)
  9. Semi-Annual Review of Closed Session Minutes
  10. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  11. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports
  12. School Funding Bill
  13. House Bill 656
  14. House Bill 5729
  15. Teacher Shortage
  16. Adjourn
External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11728/31/2017
  
Governor Bruce Rauner today signed into law SB 1947, a new funding formula for Illinois public schools. 
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2017
SPRINGFIELD – Governor Bruce Rauner today signed into law SB 1947, a new funding formula for Illinois public schools. State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., issued the following statement: 

“The Illinois State Board of Education is proud to have supported the historic work of the General Assembly and the Governor’s funding reform commission. Our Board Chairman, James Meeks, deserves special recognition for his years of relentless leadership and advocacy that set the foundation for this new agreement. I would like to thank my staff for working through the multiple proposed models to produce the numbers that made approving a more equitable funding formula possible.

“Illinois’ educators and local educational leaders have shown remarkable resourcefulness and dedication to their students and communities throughout this process. We are celebrating progress today. The evidence-based funding formula takes a historic step toward equity and ensuring every student gets the resources they need for academic excellence and postsecondary success. When the students in the greatest need receive the most support, the entire state benefits. I believe equity in education funding in Illinois is an important step to ensuring our long-term economic and civic success.” 

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) is moving forward with preparations to implement the evidence-based funding (EBF) formula, including verifying the necessary data elements with school districts. 

ISBE will work as quickly as possible to issue vouchers to the Illinois State Comptroller so that her office can make payments. The estimated timeline for school districts to receive payments is about one week from today. 

ISBE will not have final EBF calculations for a few months. Therefore, initial payments to school districts will be the preliminary base-funding minimum amounts based on final fiscal year 2017 distributions. This means districts will receive hold harmless payments until ISBE completes the EBF calculations. Each district’s preliminary base-funding minimum amounts can be viewed at www.isbe.net/ebf2018.

Districts will receive payments on the 10th and 20th of each month from September through June in FY 2018 In future years, the schedule will remain the same as General State Aid was previously distributed – 22 payments in total distributed August through June. 

The EBF formula requires ISBE to go through a data-verification process with school districts to ensure all of the data incorporated into the formula is accurate. ISBE will post a final database of all school districts’ data elements and EBF allocations on the ISBE website.
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11718/30/2017
  

​The U.S. Department of Education today approved the Illinois Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Plan. 

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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The U.S. Department of Education today approved the Illinois Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Plan. 

Equity is the grounding principle for the Illinois ESSA Plan. Every student must receive the support they need to achieve academic excellence and postsecondary success. Equity requires that those students with the greatest need must receive the greatest support. The Illinois ESSA Plan embraces the Whole Child, Whole School, Whole Community approach, recognizing that students come to their schools from interconnected learning environments. The plan crystallizes Illinois’ commitment to address the needs of the whole child: to integrate supports for students’ cognitive growth, social and emotional development, and physical well-being through the reinforcement and expansion of cross-agency and public-private-philanthropic partnerships. 

“Illinois is committed to supporting the whole child in transforming learning opportunities for all students in our state,” said Illinois State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We want every child to feel well known and well cared for in our schools and to receive the individual support they need for academic excellence and postsecondary success. The Illinois ESSA Plan gives us the opportunity to foster collaboration and partnerships in order to build educators’ and leaders’ capacity for improved student outcomes. ESSA is about knowing students, schools, and districts better, so we can provide better support. We appreciate the partnership with the U.S. Department of Education throughout the ESSA process, and we look forward to our continued efforts on behalf of each and every child.” 

The approved plan incorporates the robust and ongoing stakeholder and practitioner feedback gathered through more than 3,500 online comments and 100 in-person forums and meetings.
 
View the approved plan on the ISBE website at: https://www.isbe.net/Pages/ESSA.aspx​

The Illinois ESSA Plan transitions the state to a system of balanced accountability. The plan gathers and examines multiple indicators of school quality and student growth to inform differentiated levels of support for schools and recognizes each school’s unique local context. 

The Illinois ESSA Plan advances ambitious long-term goals for all students to attain by 2032: 90 percent or more of third-grade students are reading at or above grade level; 90 percent or more of fifth-grade students meet or exceed expectations in mathematics; 90 percent or more of ninth-grade are students on track to graduate with their cohort; and 90 percent or more of students graduate from high school ready for college and career. 

Two additional goals identify the importance of where the work occurs and who serves as the cornerstone of a child’s learning: all students are supported by highly prepared and effective teachers and school leaders; and every school offers a safe and healthy learning environment for all students. 

The Illinois ESSA Plan goals align with a larger state goal whereby 60 percent of Illinois residents earn high-quality degrees and career credentials by 2025. 

IL-EMPOWER, the next generation of Illinois’ multi-tiered system of support for schools, will serve as an infrastructure for providing differentiated capacity development for schools. IL-EMPOWER will build the capacity of Illinois’ educators, educational leaders and school communities to improve student outcomes. 

In preparation for full implementation in the 2018-19 school year, the Illinois State Board of Education will continue the process of testing and learning with Illinois’ educators and education leaders to strengthen the ESSA Plan throughout the 2017-18 transition year. 
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11708/24/2017
  

​Illinois has third-highest number of schools awarded recognition by the American School Counselor Association

​Thirteen Illinois schools have earned a prestigious national designation for their outstanding counseling programs. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) awarded the Recognized ASCA Model Program (RAMP) designation, which lasts for five years, during a special ceremony at the ASCA’s annual conference in Denver, Colo. Illinois now has 20 RAMP-designated schools, the third-highest number among all states.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – Thirteen Illinois schools have earned a prestigious national designation for their outstanding counseling programs. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) awarded the Recognized ASCA Model Program (RAMP) designation, which lasts for five years, during a special ceremony at the ASCA’s annual conference in Denver, Colo. Illinois now has 20 RAMP-designated schools, the third-highest number among all states.

ASCA Awards 2017 

ASCA awards the RAMP designation to schools that have implemented comprehensive, data-driven school counseling programs aligned with the criteria in the ASCA National Model and achieved improved student outcomes.

"Congratulations to Illinois’ 2017 RAMP-designated schools," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "Effective and comprehensive school counseling helps schools support the needs of the whole child. The collaborative and dedicated efforts of these school communities are showing what’s possible when students receive the individual support they need to achieve academic excellence and postsecondary success."

The 2017 RAMP designation criteria for improved student outcomes include high rates of college and career readiness, grade point average growth, decreased office disciplinary referrals, decreased disciplinary recidivism, increased rates of students passing classes, increased rates of enrollment in Advanced Placement courses, and increased rates of attendance during the 2016-17 school year.

"Our program goals are always created in direct response to school data, but most often revolve around academics, attendance, and behavior," said Danielle McDermott, an eighth-grade counselor at Brooks Middle School in Bolingbrook. "We achieved RAMP status because we are continually reviewing data, evaluating how effective we are, and comparing that to how much more effective we could be."

Josh Nobilio, a student services coordinator at RAMP-designated Crystal Lake South High School, reported that the targeted interventions of his school’s comprehensive counseling program improved the ACT scores of students who participated by 2.75 points from the fall practice test to the official test in the spring. The scores of students who did not receive targeted interventions grew less than 2 points in the same time.

"We wanted to take a data-driven approach, provide a full curriculum to all students, and provide targeted interventions for the students that were not meeting expectations," said Nobilio.

​​​ 2017 Recognized ASCA Model Programs (RAMP) in Illinois

SchoolDistrictCity
Batavia High SchoolBatavia Public School District 101Batavia
Brooks Middle SchoolValley View Community Unity School District 365Bolingbrook
Cary-Grove High SchoolCommunity High School District 155Cary
Crystal Lake South High SchoolCommunity High School District 155Crystal Lake
Downers Grove South High SchoolCommunity High School District 99Downers Grove
Glenbard North High SchoolGlenbard High School District 87Carol Stream
Glenbard West High SchoolGlenbard High School District 87Glen Ellyn
Jane Addams Middle SchoolValley View Community Unity School District 365Bolingbrook
Maine West High SchoolMaine Township High School District 207Des Plaines
Niles West High SchoolNiles Township High Schools District 219Skokie
Rotolo Middle SchoolBatavia Public School District 101Batavia
Von Steuben Metropolitan Science CenterChicago Public Schools District 299Chicago
Willowbrook High SchoolDuPage High School District 88Villa Park
​​

For more information on school counseling in Illinois and a complete list of current Illinois RAMP schools, visit www.ilschoolcounselor.org.

Assessment & AccountabilityAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11698/21/2017
  
2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year to be named Oct. 28

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the 10 finalists for the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year. ISBE will name one individual from the 10 finalists as the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year during the “Those Who Excel” banquet in October. The state’s annual educator recognition banquet and program will acknowledge the contributions and accomplishments of more than 230 educators and school personnel from throughout the state.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the 10 finalists for the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year. ISBE will name one individual from the 10 finalists as the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year during the "Those Who Excel" banquet in October. The state’s annual educator recognition banquet and program will acknowledge the contributions and accomplishments of more than 230 educators and school personnel from throughout the state.

"The Those Who Excel program honors and celebrates some of Illinois’ most exemplary teachers at every level," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "Every student deserves to feel like they belong. Our 10 Teacher of the Year finalists are outstanding representatives of educators who continuously go above and beyond to make students feel well known and well cared for. Their level of commitment, their passion, and their dedication is evident in their strong relationships with students, colleagues, and families within their communities."

A selection committee composed of administrators, teachers, educational service personnel, student support personnel, and past Illinois Teacher of the Year winners reviewed 234 Teacher of the Year nominations this year.

Ricardo "Ricky" Castro is the 2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year. Ricky teaches English as a second language, language arts, and Spanish at Elk Grove High School in Township High School District 214.

"Through my experiences as the Illinois Teacher of the Year, it has become more evident to me that teachers today are daily leaders that foster the social development, self-actualization, and academic growth needed to thrive in our diverse and democratic society," Castro said. "It has been such a great opportunity to honor and recognize teachers as they provide a daily example of what it means to serve others in one of the most life-changing professions any individual could ever join."

ISBE will announce the 2018 Illinois Teacher of the Year during the Those Who Excel banquet on Saturday, Oct. 28, at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center in Normal. The Teacher of the Year will represent Illinois at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., and in the Council of Chief State School Officers’ National Teacher of the Year Program.

Here are this year’s finalists:

  • Valarie Berger teaches family and consumer sciences at West Leyden High School, located in Franklin Park, in Leyden High School District 212.
  • James Connelly is an industrial technology teacher at Morton West High School, located in Berwyn, in J. Sterling Morton High School District 201.
  • Teresa Eden is a Title 1 reading teacher at Monroe Center Grade School, located in Monroe Center, in Meridian Community Unit School District 223.
  • William Farmer teaches biology and chemistry at Evanston Township High School, located in Evanston, in District 202.
  • Lindsey Jensen teaches English at Dwight Township High School, located in Dwight, in Dwight Public Schools District 230.
  • Erin Miller is a fourth-grade teacher in a self-contained classroom at Brimfield Grade School, located in Brimfield, in Brimfield Unit District 309.
  • Jamie Nash-Mayberry teaches social studies at Shawnee High School, located in Wolf Lake, in Shawnee Community Unit School District 84.
  • Angie Noble is a third-grade teacher at Jerseyville East Elementary School, located in Jerseyville, in Jersey Community Unit School District 100.
  • Faith Skinner teaches math in sixth grade at Emily G. Johns School, located in Plano, in Plano Community Unit School District 88.
  • Morgan Teske is a special education teacher in grades 9-12 at East High School, located in Rockford, in Rockford Public School District 205.

For photos of the finalists, please contact Ann Muraro-Lacopo at the ISBE Office of Communications at (217) 782-4648.

Assessment & AccountabilityAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBADIGER ASHWINI
11688/15/2017
  

​Communities, families, and educators will better understand students’ developmental needs, supporting long-term success

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced that the state will obtain and report consistent measures of developmental readiness for all kindergarten students starting in the fall of 2017. The Kindergarten Individual Development Survey (KIDS) will guide kindergarten teachers through observations of students as they go about their normal daily routines of playing and schoolwork.

NoNo
2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced that the state will obtain and report consistent measures of developmental readiness for all kindergarten students starting in the fall of 2017. The Kindergarten Individual Development Survey (KIDS) will guide kindergarten teachers through observations of students as they go about their normal daily routines of playing and schoolwork.

Children enter kindergarten with a wide variety of early learning experiences, from home care, child care, private preschool, and Head Start to learning English or requiring special education services. KIDS will deepen the state’s understanding of where children have and do not have access to high-quality early learning opportunities. KIDS will help communities and service providers across sectors understand what children need for success in school.

KIDS"Children begin developing critical competencies and skills in the first five years of life,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “The path toward college and career readiness truly starts with the path toward kindergarten readiness. Preparing children for success in school is a whole community responsibility. KIDS will help schools, families, and communities to bridge learning and connect supports for children in their critical early years.”

ISBE has piloted KIDS across the state since 2012, engaging more than 50,000 children. Three-hundred and eighty unique school districts have entered KIDS data into KIDSTech in the last five years. (KIDSTech is a server-based computer support system for entering data and producing reports.) View case studies from the KIDS pilots in

“We used to be very mastery-focused, like, ‘Here’s the skill you have to master,’” said Kristina Davis, assistant superintendent for learning in West Chicago Elementary School District 33, which will begin its sixth year of administering KIDS this fall. “But in kindergarten, every child comes in with a different experience, so now our focus is on each individual child’s target, rather than a district target.”

KIDS facilitates observations to measure children’s knowledge in language, literacy, math, social and emotional development, and in skill-building competencies such as curiosity, creativity, and perseverance. The 14 State Readiness Measures, spanning four developmental domains, are strong predictors of a child’s long-term educational success.

“In a district like ours where we’re under-resourced and the kids are lacking exposure to a lot of things and experiences, KIDS has been really important for educators and great for our kids,” said Davis.

The state requires all districts to use the KIDS tool to observe students on 14 measures within the first 40 days of students’ attendance, but districts do have the option to collect additional measures and to conduct additional rounds of observations. Many pilot districts have chosen to expand their use of KIDS. Teachers have found the information about their students to be critical to their instructional decision-making and to communicating with families about how to support children’s development at home.  KIDS is the result of years of planning and collaboration among child development specialists, early childhood advocates, educators, elementary teachers and administrators, and ISBE. Key partners include Advance Illinois, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Steans Family Foundation, Joyce Foundation, and the W. Clement and Jesse V. Stone Foundation. 

ISBE launched a webpage with resources, fact sheets, frequently asked questions, and other information for teachers, administrators, and families at KIDS.

 

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11678/14/2017
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the eligibility guidelines for students to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The policy took effect at the start of the 2018 fiscal year on July 1, 2017. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets the policy for each fiscal year to reflect any changes in the federal poverty guidelines.

NoNo
2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the eligibility guidelines for students to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The policy took effect at the start of the 2018 fiscal year on July 1, 2017. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets the policy for each fiscal year to reflect any changes in the federal poverty guidelines.

The National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program are funded by USDA and administered by ISBE. Free and reduced-price meals ensure access to nutritious meals and snacks for families unable to pay the full price.

"Healthy students are better learners",said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "Many of our students count on these nutritious meals to fuel them to reach their full potential. Our vision for schools is that they support students’ cognitive growth, social and emotional development, and physical well-being. ISBE is very proud to administer school nutrition programs in Illinois."

The following chart lists the household size and income criteria that determine students’ eligibility to receive free and reduced-price lunch, breakfast, and after-school snacks through the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. USDA’s Fiscal Year 2018 Income Eligibility Guidelines are also on the ISBE’s website at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/IEG-18.pdf.

Income Eligibility Guidelines: Effective from July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018

Free Meals 130% Federal Poverty Guideline and Reduced-Price Meals 185% Federal Poverty Guideline 

USDA provided the following information for families and guardians seeking free or reduced-price meals for students:

Children from households that meet federal guidelines are eligible for free or reduced-price meal services. Complete one application per household for all children that attend the same school district.

All meals served must meet the U. S. Department of Agriculture meal requirements. However, if a child has been determined by a doctor to have a disability and the disability would prevent the child from eating the regular school meal, this school will make substitutions prescribed by the doctor. If a substitution is needed, there will be no extra charge for the meal. If you believe your child needs substitutions because of a disability, please contact the school for further information.

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced-price meal services, households must complete the application as soon as possible, sign it, and return it to the school. Additional copies of the application form are available in the principal’s office in each school. Households should answer all applicable questions on the form. An application which does not contain all the required information cannot be processed and approved by the school. Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants may be eligible for free/reduced-price meals and are encouraged to complete an application for meal benefits.

The required information is as follows:

SNAP/TANF HOUSEHOLDS: If the school provided you a letter that stated your child(ren) is eligible for free meals via the direct certification process, you do not have to complete this application to receive free meal benefits. Households that currently receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for their child(ren), only have to list the child(ren)’s name and at least one SNAP or TANF case number and sign the application. If at least one SNAP/TANF case number is provided for any household member, then all children listed on the application are categorically eligible for free meals. Applications listing LINK card numbers cannot be used for free or reduced-price meals.

ALL OTHER HOUSEHOLDS: If a household’s income is at or below the level shown on the income scale, children are eligible for either free or reduced-price meal services. Households must provide the following information:

  • The names of all household members;
  • The last four digits of the Social Security number of the adult household member signing the application, or indicate if the adult does not have a Social Security number;
  • The amount of income each household member received last month, how frequently it is paid, and where it came from (wages, child support, etc.); and
  • The signature of an adult household member.

The information on the application may be checked by school or other officials at any time during the school year.Households may apply for benefits at any time during the school year. Households that are not eligible now but have a decrease in household income, an increase in household size, or a household member becomes unemployed, should fill out an application at that time. Homeless, migrant, runaway youth, Head Start and foster care children, are categorically eligible for free meals. Please follow instructions and return form to school. Households that do not agree with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss it with the school. Households also have the right to a fair hearing.

###

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement
In accordance with federal civil rights law and USDA civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA; its agencies, offices, and employees; and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the agency (state or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) found at https://www.ascr.usda.gov/how-file-program-discrimination-complaint and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. Fax:   (202) 690-7442; or
  3. Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.


External CommunicationsBADIGER ASHWINI
11668/11/2017
  

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in both Chicago and Springfield on Wednesday, August 16.

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2017

Agenda announced for Illinois State Board of Education meeting August 16   

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in both Chicago and Springfield on Wednesday, August 16.   

View the packet for the meeting at https://www.isbe.net/Documents_Board_Meetings/08-16-2017-Packet.pdf

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting

August 16, 2017

9 a.m.

Chicago Location:ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
 100 W. Randolph St., Chicago
   
Springfield Location:ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
 100 N. First St., Springfield

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Swearing-in of Susie Morrison, Board Member
  3. Public Participation
  4. Resolutions and Recognition
    1. Ben Martindale, Chief Educational Officer, North Chicago School District 187
  5. Presentations & Updates
    1. KIDS Update (Advance Illinois)
  6. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: June 14, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 650 (Charter Schools)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 228 (Transitional Bilingual Education)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Advanced Placement Test Fee Program
      2. 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program
      3. After School Matters Program Grant
      4. Truants' Alternative & Optional Education Program (TAOEP) Grant
      5. IDEA Part B Discretionary Grant – Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Collaborative (ISTAC) / Illinois Multi-Tiered System of Supports Network (IL MTSS Network) Continuation Funding
      6. IDEA Part D State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) – Illinois Multi-tiered System of Supports Network (IL MTSS Network) Continuation Funding
      7. Contract for Assessment Development, Content Management and Technical Service Provider
      8. Illinois Science Assessment Technology Vendor Sole Source Contract with Breakthrough Technologies
      9. Illinois Science Assessment Technology Vendor Request for Sealed Proposals
      10. Illinois Science Assessment Intergovernmental Agreement with the Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois University Carbondale
      11. Southwest Organizing Project
        End of Consent Agenda
    5. Illinois Science Assessment Threshold Scores and Performance Level Descriptors
  7. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. ESSA Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  8. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  9. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
  10. Closed Session (as needed)
  11. Adjourn
Assessment & AccountabilityBADIGER ASHWINI
11658/8/2017
  

​The Illinois State Board of Education today released the following statement regarding the status of the model for Governor Bruce Rauner’s Amendatory Veto to Senate Bill 1

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2017

SPRINGFIELD –The Illinois State Board of Education today released the following statement regarding the status of the model for Governor Bruce Rauner’s Amendatory Veto to Senate Bill 1:

“State Board of Education staff transmitted a model of the Governor’s Amendatory Veto to SB 1 on Monday afternoon. At 9:27 a.m. today, August 8, 2017, State Board of Education staff received an email from Department of Revenue staff reporting a significant error in the TIF EAV data that the Department of Revenue submitted to the State Board of Education for modeling.  

“Once State Board of Education staff receive a revised data set from the Department of Revenue, agency staff will update the model and re-transmit to the Governor’s Office. As with past funding reform models, it will be at the discretion of the sponsor, in this case the Governor, when and how to distribute the file.”

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBADIGER ASHWINI
11648/3/2017
  
National Immunization Awareness Month in August promotes life-saving vaccinations for preventable diseases

​The Illinois State Board of Education and the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) are reminding parents and guardians to check their children’s vaccination records to make sure they meet immunization requirements prior to the first day of school.

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2017

SPRINGFIELD –The Illinois State Board of Education and the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) are reminding parents and guardians to check their children’s vaccination records to make sure they meet immunization requirements prior to the first day of school.

The federally funded Vaccines for Children program provides vaccines at no cost to children in low-income households. Families can call (312) 746-6050 in Chicago or (217) 785-1455 in all other parts of Illinois to learn about free vaccines.

“Immunizations are central to keeping students healthy and ready to learn,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Keeping children’s vaccinations up to date according to the recommended schedule is one of the most important things parents and guardians can do to protect the health of the youngest and oldest among us. Whether for a baby starting at a new child care facility, a toddler heading to preschool, or a student going back to elementary, middle or high school, I encourage parents and guardians to check their children’s vaccination records and, if necessary, schedule a visit with a physician or clinic. Doing so now will avoid a potential last-minute rush.”

Immunizations have eradicated several serious diseases, such as smallpox, polio, and diphtheria in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Instances of other serious diseases, such as measles and rubella, have dropped by more than 99 percent since the pre-vaccination era. Keeping students’ vaccinations up to date is especially important, as diseases can spread quickly among groups of unvaccinated children.

“Child care facilities, preschool programs, and schools are prone to outbreaks of infectious diseases,” said IDPH Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D. “Children in these settings can easily spread illnesses to one another due to poor hand washing, not covering their coughs, and other factors, such as interacting in crowded environments. When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk for disease and can spread disease to others in their child care centers, classrooms, and communities – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions.”

View the Fall 2017 Minimum Immunization Requirements and other resources on the IDPH website at http://www.dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/prevention-wellness/immunization

For additional information about school health issues in Illinois, visit https://www.isbe.net/Pages/School-Health-Issues.aspx.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11637/24/2017
  

​Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program federal grants help schools introduce children to a variety of fresh produce

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) federal grant recipients for the 2017-18 school year. The program assists schools with introducing students to a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables they may not otherwise have the opportunity to learn about or eat. 

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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) federal grant recipients for the 2017-18 school year. The program assists schools with introducing students to a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables they may not otherwise have the opportunity to learn about or eat. 

“Research shows that students with access to healthy meals perform better in school,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Introducing young students to fresh fruits and vegetables helps to establish lifelong healthy eating habits and fosters an interest in nutritious foods – where they come from, what they look like, and what they do for growing brains and bodies. The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program supports ISBE’s vision of Illinois as a state of whole, healthy children.” 

ISBE has administered FFVP federal grants to elementary schools across the state each school year since 2008-09. All elementary schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program are eligible to apply. The program criteria gives priority to elementary schools that have greater free and reduced-price lunch participation.

For instance, in 2015, a Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program grant made it possible to offer fresh peaches to students at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School in Chicago – it was the first time some students had tasted a fresh peach.

The school districts awarded FFVP grants for the 2017-18 school year are:​

  • Jacksonville SD 117
  • Rockford SD 205
  • Jackson Charter School
  • Maywood-Melrose Park-Broadview 89
  • Lindop SD 92
  • Berwyn South SD 100
  • Summit SD 104
  • Calumet Public SD 132
  • Gen George Patton SD 133
  • Prairie-Hills ESD 144
  • Harvey SD 152
  • Brookwood SD 167
  • Ludlow CCSD 142
  • North Wamac SD 186
  • Mount Vernon SD 80
  • Bethel SD 82
  • Patoka CUSD 100
  • Central City SD 133
  • Centralia SD 135
  • Sandoval CUSD 501
  • Archdiocese of Chicago-Nw Hwy
  • City of Chicago SD 299
  • Betty Shabazz International Charter School
  • Lincoln ESD 27
  • CCSD 180
  • Carbondale ESD 95
  • Tri-County Sp Ed Jnt Agreement
  • Meridian CUSD 101
  • Aurora West USD 129
  • Aurora East USD 131
  • CUSD 300
  • Pembroke CCSD 259
  • Waukegan CUSD 60
  • Round Lake CUSD 116
  • Streator ESD 44
  • North Greene CUSD 3
  • Madison CUSD 12
  • East Alton SD 13
  • Pleasant Valley SD 62
  • Pleasant Hill SD 69
  • Peoria Heights CUSD 325
  • Silvis SD 34
  • East Moline SD 37
  • Rock Island SD 41
  • Brooklyn UD 188
  • East St Louis SD 189
  • Springfield SD 186
  • Laraway CCSD 70C



ISBE’s Nutrition and Wellness Programs Division will present the free School Nutrition Programs Back to School Conference on Aug. 2-3, 2017, at the Crowne Plaza in Springfield.

ISBE will recognize the 2017 School Nutrition Champion award-winner, Sandra Duniphan, the cafeteria manager for Pontiac-William Holliday School District 105 in Fairview Heights, at the conference.

The free conference for new and veteran school nutrition professionals also will include sessions on new staff orientation, menu planning, procurement and resource management, the Web-based Illinois Nutrition System, local wellness policies, USDA Foods, food safety, Farm to Schools, and more.

Administrators can register for the event at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/SNPB2S.aspx​.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11627/19/2017
  

​Teacher shortage leaves more than 1,000 positions unfilled statewide  

​SPRINGFIELD – Governor Bruce Rauner recently signed into law Public Act 100-0013 to help address the critical shortage of educators in Illinois public schools. Public Act 100-0013 streamlines the licensing requirements for various endorsement areas, such as Career and Technical Education (CTE) and school psychologist, and makes other related changes. The measure was spearheaded by the Illinois State Board of Education and was sponsored by Representative Fred Crespo (D-Streamwood) and Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Plainfield). 

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2017

SPRINGFIELD – Governor Bruce Rauner recently signed into law Public Act 100-0013 to help address the critical shortage of educators in Illinois public schools. Public Act 100-0013 streamlines the licensing requirements for various endorsement areas, such as Career and Technical Education (CTE) and school psychologist, and makes other related changes. The measure was spearheaded by the Illinois State Board of Education and was sponsored by Representative Fred Crespo (D-Streamwood) and Senator Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant (D-Plainfield). 

More than 1,000 teaching positions statewide are unfilled, according to data collected from school districts in October 2016. The majority (approximately 67 percent) of school districts in Illinois have 100 or fewer faculty members. Even one unfilled position in a small school district significantly impacts students’ learning opportunities. 

“Teachers are agents of change in students’ lives and agents of change in their schools,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Fulfilling the mission and vision of our public school system depends on the teachers in the classroom. Public Act 100-0013 reduces barriers for educators while maintaining the high standards students deserve. We need to continue to think creatively about expanding opportunities for individuals who want to teach and expanding opportunities for current teachers so they feel valued for the incredible work they do and remain a part of our schools.”

Illinois’ teacher shortage affects every school district in unique ways. Milford Area Public Schools District 124 Superintendent Dr. Dale Hastings and Dr. Mike Curry, who was at the time superintendent of VIT Community Unit School District 2 and is now superintendent of Abingdon-Avon Community Unit School District #276, testified at the May 24 State Board of Education meeting about the specific ways the teacher shortage affects the students in their districts. 

“Even one vacant position in our rural district puts our students at risk of not getting the instruction they need and falling behind,” said Hastings. “This licensure change will allow our rural Illinois school district to fill positions that are greatly needed. This licensure change demonstrates the willingness of ISBE and our legislative leaders to understand the needs facing school districts across the state and then be creative to solve the need.”

The Illinois Association of Regional School Superintendents served as a critical partner in developing and advocating for the legislation.

"We know our schools need to fill many positions, and every hurdle in an educator’s way prevents schools from filling these positions and providing the best possible instructional environment for students,” said Mark Jontry, president of the Illinois Association of Regional Superintendents of Schools. “We want to thank the Governor, legislators, and ISBE for working together to reduce the licensing hurdles while maintaining high standards to put more qualified, motivated, and talented educators in our schools to guide students in their education and their lives.”

Public Act 100-0013 makes a number of changes to the School Code, including: 

  • Lowers the minimum age for an individual to apply for an educator license to 19.
  • Allows individuals who hold a valid CTE license to substitute teach CTE courses.
  • Removes the 20-hour coursework requirement for individuals who want to renew a provisional CTE license.
  • Provides statutory authority for the Director of Special Education endorsement.
  • Applies the Administrator Academy requirement to maintain an active administrator license only to individuals who have worked in an administrative position within the past five years.
  • Allows school psychologists to renew their Illinois licenses by providing proof of valid national licensure. 

The new law took effect July 1, 2017.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBADIGER ASHWINI
11617/7/2017
  

​Best practices videos highlight innovation at four Illinois charter schools 

​The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has awarded $300,000 in federal grants to two Illinois charter schools to help other schools adopt their successful programs for bilingual education and college-ready writing. The Academy for Global Citizenship (AGC) in Chicago and Southland College Prep Charter High School in Richton Park each will receive $150,000 to share the best practices they incubated at their schools.

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2017

​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has awarded $300,000 in federal grants to two Illinois charter schools to help other schools adopt their successful programs for bilingual education and college-ready writing. The Academy for Global Citizenship (AGC) in Chicago and Southland College Prep Charter High School in Richton Park each will receive $150,000 to share the best practices they incubated at their schools. 

The grant funds come from the $42 million federally funded Charter School Program (CSP), which ISBE administers to expand the number of high-quality and educationally diverse charter schools in Illinois and to evaluate the impact of charter schools on student academic achievement, staff, and families. 

ISBE also collaborated with the Illinois Principals Association to produce four videos highlighting the work of Illinois charter schools that are building inclusive cultures of success and becoming anchors in their communities. The videos are available through the Ed Leaders Network and on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/BestPracticeCorner.aspx.  

“Students succeed when leaders and educators cultivate communities of practice to learn from each other," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We have to take every opportunity to support schools coaching schools and educators coaching educators in order to expand what works. Congratulations to Academy for Global Citizenship, Southland College Prep Charter High School, and their partner schools. I look forward to following these exciting partnerships." 

ISBE released a competitive Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Charter Schools Program's Dissemination of Best Practices subgrants on December 30, 2016. A team of external reviewers selected the two outstanding schools out of 16 total applications. 

The Academy for Global Citizenship will use its grant funds to share its successful dual language model with another public school in Chicago. AGC's model offers two-way immersion, with native Spanish speakers, native English speakers, and simultaneous bilingual students learning collaboratively so all students learn to read, write, and speak in both languages. Hispanic students at AGC performed better in reading growth than students at 58 percent of schools nationally and better in math growth than students at 57 percent of schools nationally on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress assessment. AGC will work closely with teachers at its partner school through study cycles, peer coaching, and classroom observations. 

Southland College Prep Charter High School will use its CSP grant funds to share its successful college-ready writing program, called the Writing Your Future Project, with a neighboring elementary district. The program helps students express their thoughts succinctly and is the cornerstone of a student's preparation for college. Southland's college persistence rate for students in its first three graduating classes is at 75 percent, which is 10 percentage points higher than the national average. More than two-thirds of Southland students scored a 21 or above in the English content area of the ACT, and 84 percent of students consistently score 3 points or higher on the Advanced Placement English Composition exam. Southland College Prep Charter High School will work with its partner district to develop and implement a writing curriculum for the third through eighth grades, based on core elements of the Writing Your Future Project.  

The CSP grant funds will support both AGC and Southland in monitoring student achievement across the partnerships to further assess the impacts of both programs. 

ISBE plans to release the next CSP Dissemination of Best Practices RFP in December 2017. Find more information about the Charter Schools Program grants on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Charter-Schools.aspx

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11606/28/2017
  

SPRINGFIELD — The federal eligibility guidelines for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) will allow for a slight increase in household income for participants to qualify for fiscal year 2018. The CACFP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The CACFP assists childcare centers, Head Start programs, before- and after-school programs, emergency shelters, and daycare home providers with funding to provide nutritious meals to children in their care. All participating childcare centers and daycare homes must provide meals to enrolled children at no additional charge.

NoNo
2017

SPRINGFIELD — The federal eligibility guidelines for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) will allow for a slight increase in household income for participants to qualify for fiscal year 2018. The CACFP is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The CACFP assists childcare centers, Head Start programs, before- and after-school programs, emergency shelters, and daycare home providers with funding to provide nutritious meals to children in their care. All participating childcare centers and daycare homes must provide meals to enrolled children at no additional charge.

"The Child and Adult Care Food Program ensures children in daycare who may not otherwise have regular access to healthy food are getting the proper nutrition they need to fuel their developing bodies and brains," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "Physical health impacts learning. ISBE is proud to administer the federally funded CACFP to help address food insecurity in Illinois."

Individuals in households who participate in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are automatically eligible to receive free meal benefits. The USDA Household Income Eligibility Guidelines determine eligibility to receive free meal benefits for families that do not receive TANF or SNAP benefits. If a household's income falls within or below the listed guidelines, they should contact their childcare center or daycare home provider to learn about benefits of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. They may be required to complete an application and provide income, TANF, or SNAP information.

Children enrolled in Head Start or Early Head Start programs at approved Head Start facilities and foster care children who are legal responsibilities of the state or court also receive free meal benefits. Parents or guardians should contact their childcare center or daycare home provider to find out if they participate in CACFP.

Income Eligibility Guidelines: Effective from July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018

Free Meals 130% Federal Poverty Guideline and Reduced-Price Meals 185% Federal Poverty Guideline 

In 2013, a total of 1,755,180 people (643,040 of them children) in Illinois were food insecure, according to Feeding America's Mind the Meal Gap 2015.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11596/22/2017
  

Join ISBE live on Facebook for a Q&A on Wednesday, June 28 at 3 p.m.​

CHICAGO – The State of Illinois has adopted a new Postsecondary and Career Expectations (PaCE) framework that outlines what students should know and actions they should take from middle school through 12th grade to select the right postsecondary option, prepare for careers, and access financial aid opportunities. Through the action of their governing boards, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE), Illinois Community College Board (ICCB), and the Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC) have all adopted​ the framework and will be using it to support and advance their efforts in these areas.
NoNo
2017

​CHICAGO – The State of Illinois has adopted a new Postsecondary and Career Expectations (PaCE) framework that outlines what students should know and actions they should take from middle school through 12th grade to select the right postsecondary option, prepare for careers, and access financial aid opportunities.  Through the action of their governing boards, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE), Illinois Community College Board (ICCB), and the Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC) have all adopted the framework and will be using it to support and advance their efforts in these areas. 

Grade level learning standards help teachers, students, and parents make sure that students are on track when it comes to learning academic concepts. But when it comes to what a student should know about life after high school—concepts like how to choose a college or what to look for when exploring careers—there has not been a similar set of grade level milestones addressing what students should know and when. 

“The new PaCE guidelines offer a framework that teachers, schools, and others who work with students can use to help improve college and career readiness," said Dr. Beth Purvis, Illinois Secretary of Education and Chair of the Illinois P-20 Council. “We are pleased to support this important cross-agency effort to ensure middle and high school students have academic and work experiences that support them and their families in making well-informed plans and decisions for their adult life." 

The PaCE framework is one of four key strategies included in the Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act (Public Act 99-0674) (PWR Act), which unanimously passed the Illinois House and Senate in May 2016 and was signed by Governor Rauner in July 2016. The PWR Act takes a student-centered and competency-based approach to assist Illinois students to prepare for and select the right postsecondary option, and ultimately obtain meaningful employment.  The PaCE framework provides an important foundation for the three other strategies implemented by the PWR Act:  a new system for school districts to award college and career pathways endorsements on high school diplomas, supporting students to avoid remediation in college through targeted math instruction during the senior year, and piloting competency-based high school graduation requirements.   

The framework is intended to be used by communities to organize their activities around postsecondary education and career readiness and financial aid supports. While the PWR Act does not require school districts to adopt it, state agencies will use PaCE to organize their supports in these areas to local communities.  

For example, ISAC is using PaCE as a framework to guide the assistance it delivers through a recently awarded seven-year, $18.6 million federal Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant that will provide services to approximately 30,500 students in 25 middle schools and 25 high schools across Illinois. ISAC is also supporting the work of the Northern Illinois University P-20 Center in the creation of professional development modules on the PaCE framework for administrators and school counselors. In addition, the Northern Illinois Regional P-20 Network has created tools to help implement the PaCE Framework, especially On PaCE to Thrive: A Guide to Community Action for College and Career Readiness, which provides activities to be shared by stakeholders in each community.

PaCE was developed through a multi-year process led by the Illinois P-20 Council's College and Career Readiness Committee. The advisory committee that developed PaCE included over 30 members from across the State representing school counselors, district administrators, universities, community colleges, teacher, employers, state agencies, and nonprofit organizations.  

While PaCE was not officially adopted until this month, some Illinois school districts have already begun to implement it.   

“Our district has done a significant amount of work on college and career readiness, and we have found PaCE to be a great modeling tool to build on that work," said Dr. Travis L. McGuire, Superintendent of Hinkley-Big Rock CUSD #429.  “The flexibility of the framework has allowed us to identify and implement important components aligned to our local needs and resources." 

ISBE will go live on Facebook at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, June 28, to answer questions about PaCE at www.facebook.com/IllinoisStateBoardofEducation. ISBE Director of Community Partnerships and Secondary Transformation Mary Reynolds and Illini Central CUSD 189 Superintendent Mike Ward will share how they envision using the framework to help all students prepare for college and career. 

The official PaCE framework is available at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/PaCE_Revisions.pdf. Resources for PaCE and other aspects of the PWR Act are available at www.pwract.org.  

About the Illinois Board of Higher Education

The Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE) is the state's agency for planning and coordination of higher education, including connecting the needs of the state's workforce with college degrees and postsecondary training programs. www.ibhe.org 

About the Illinois Community College Board

The Illinois Community College Board is the state coordinating board for community colleges. Illinois is home to 48 community colleges in 39 districts and has the third largest community college system in the nation serving close to 1 million residents each year in credit and noncredit courses. www.iccb.org 

About the Illinois Student Assistance Commission

The mission of the Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC) is to help make college accessible and affordable for students throughout Illinois. ISAC provides comprehensive, objective, and timely information on education and financial aid for students and their families--giving them access to the tools they need to make the educational choices that are right for them. Then, through the state scholarship and grant programs ISAC administers, ISAC can help students make those choices a reality. www.isac.org 

About the Illinois State Board of Education

The mission of the Illinois State Board of Education is to provide leadership and resources to achieve excellence across all Illinois districts through engaging legislators, school administrators, teachers, students, parents, and other stakeholders in formulating and advocating for policies that enhance education, empower districts, and ensure equitable outcomes for all students. ISBE envisions Illinois as state of whole, healthy children nested in whole, healthy systems supporting communities wherein all citizens are socially and economically secure. www.isbe.net

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11586/20/2017
  

​State Board, Illinois Education Association, and Illinois Federation of Teachers host luncheon to honor outstanding educators across the state 

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today joined the Illinois Federation of Teachers (IFT) and the Illinois Education Association (IEA) to honor 40 educators who have been selected by their professional organizations as the best in their fields during the 2016-17 school year. The seventh annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Luncheon held today in Normal honored education professionals in a wide range of disciplines.  
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2017
​SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today joined the Illinois Federation of Teachers (IFT) and the Illinois Education Association (IEA) to honor 40 educators who have been selected by their professional organizations as the best in their fields during the 2016-17 school year. The seventh annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Luncheon held today in Normal honored education professionals in a wide range of disciplines.   

“These outstanding educators recognized today bring to life the phrase, ‘It takes a village,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Educating each student as a whole child requires talented and dedicated professionals in all disciplines. I want to personally thank them for their tireless efforts to create safe and caring school climates, and for going the extra mile to make their schools places where all children feel welcomed. It is an honor and a privilege to have the opportunity to publicly recognize their efforts.”

ISBE, IFT, and IEA co-hosted today’s luncheon at the Bloomington-Normal Marriott Hotel and Conference Center. 

“The Illinois Education Association is always proud to help sponsor the Teacher Recognition Luncheon, a wonderful way to thank and acknowledge Illinois’ many outstanding educators,” said IEA President Cinda Klickna. “The award winners have shown exemplary teaching in each of their fields, and they remind us that great education is being delivered to our students every day in every school in Illinois.”

ISBE administers the Those Who Excel program each fall, naming a Teacher of the Year and recognizing more than 200 educators nominated by their districts or members of their communities for outstanding service. Township High School District 214’s Ricardo Castro, was named the 2017 Illinois Teacher of the Year. Castro teaches English as a Second Language, Language Arts, and Spanish at Elk Grove High School. The annual Exemplary Teacher Recognition Award Luncheon provides an opportunity to honor other award-winning teachers from across the state.

“Teachers and school staff have some of the hardest and most important jobs in the world,” said IFT President Dan Montgomery. “They provide our students with support and offer them opportunities to grow, often with few resources. These outstanding educators have gone above and beyond, and it’s an honor to recognize them for their enthusiasm, creativity, and commitment.”
The following exemplary educators were recognized today:



​     



External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11576/14/2017
  
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in both Chicago and Springfield on Wednesday, June 14.
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2017

Agenda announced for Illinois State Board of Education meeting June 14   

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in both Chicago and Springfield on Wednesday, June 14.

View the packet for the meeting at https://www.isbe.net/Documents_Board_Meetings/2017-06-packet.pdf

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting

June 14, 2017

9 a.m.

Chicago Location:ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
 100 W. Randolph St., Chicago
   
Springfield Location:ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
 100 N. First St., Springfield

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Resolutions and Recognition
    1. Jeff Vose, Illinois Association of Regional School Superintendents
  4. Presentations & Updates
    1. EducationSuperHighway Update
    2. Review of New Organization Structure Update
  5. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: May 24, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 23 (Standards for School Support Personnel Endorsements)
      2. Part 75 (Agricultural Education)
    3. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Technical Assistance to the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program
      2. Renewal of Contract for Administration of the Centralized Demographic Dataset
      3. Illinois Principals Association Grant
      4. Renewal of Intergovernmental Agreement with UChicago Impact for the 5Essentials Survey of Learning Conditions
      5. Learning Technology Centers Intergovernmental Agreement
      6. Renewal of Intergovernmental Agreement for the Illinois Interactive Report Card 
      7. Statewide System of Support Continuation of Funding to Fiscal Agents for Foundational Services
      8. IDEA, Part B, Preschool Discretionary Grants
      9. DELL
    4. *Update to the Strategic Plan
    5. *Illinois State Educator Preparation and Licensure Board Appointments
    6. *Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act
    7. *2018 Board Meeting Dates
      End of Consent Agenda
  6. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
    2. Status of Agency Rulemaking: Fiscal Year 2017
    3. Rulemakings Anticipated for FY 2018
  9. Closed Session (as needed)
  10. Adjourn
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11566/5/2017
  

Summer Food Service Program family kick-off event in Chicago set for June 23

SPRINGFIELD — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program, also known as Summer Meals, is kicking off at more than 1,500 sites across Illinois, with sponsors continuing to open additional sites. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) administers the Summer Meals program to provide free and nutritious meals and snacks to children during the summer months in between the school years. Last year, Summer Meals sites served over 5.4 million meals.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program, also known as Summer Meals, is kicking off at more than 1,500 sites across Illinois, with sponsors continuing to open additional sites. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) administers the Summer Meals program to provide free and nutritious meals and snacks to children during the summer months in between the school years. Last year, Summer Meals sites served over 5.4 million meals. 

ISBE partner organizations No Kid Hungry and the Illinois Hunger Coalition staff a calling and texting hotline to refer families to their nearest meal sites. Interested families can call (800) 359-2163, text “FoodIL” or “ComidasIL” to 877-877, or visit SummerMealsIllinois.org. Days and times of operation vary by site. Summer Meals serves children and teens age 18 and younger.

“Summer Meals helps to bridge the gap for children who rely on school breakfast and lunch during the year,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “ISBE deeply appreciates the Summer Meals sites and sponsors who bring the program to life in hundreds of communities across the state. Research shows that students with access to healthy meals perform better in school. ISBE is proud to administer the Summer Meals program and to continue investing in students’ health, which is critical to learning.”

Illinois Lieutenant Governor Evelyn Sanguinetti has partnered with Summer Meals to raise awareness of the need for more program sponsors. Since taking office, Sanguinetti has advocated for programs that fight food insecurity, childhood hunger, and the lack of healthy food options in certain communities.

“As someone who grew up in poverty, I know firsthand the helplessness a child feels when they are unsure of from where their next meal will come,” said Sanguinetti. “This is an unfortunate reality for far too many children in Illinois. I strongly encourage school districts, local leaders, and nonprofit organizations to join the Summer Meals program and partner with me to ensure no child goes hungry this summer.”

For every 100 children who receive meals through the National School Lunch Programs (NSLP), only 14 received meals over the summer. Although 172 SFSP sponsors and 135 Seamless Summer Option sponsors administered over 2,200 meal sites in 2016, Illinois’ children need many more sponsors to provide access to healthy food in every county in the state. At the end of 2016, Illinois had 35 counties with no SFSP sponsors or meal sites. Organizations can learn more about becoming a Summer Meals sponsor at www.isbe.net/sfsp.

Research shows that healthy students are better learners. Healthy students achieve higher on all levels of academic performance, including grades, attendance, and cognitive skills and attitudes. The Summer Meals program helps to keep students healthy while school is not in session, so they return to the classroom ready to learn in the fall.

Chicagoland Summer Meals sites will hold a family kick-off event on Friday, June 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Horner Park at 2741 W. Montrose Ave., Chicago, IL 60618. Learn more at http://riseandshineillinois.org/news-events/.

###

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement
In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at https://www.ascr.usda.gov/how-file-program-discrimination-complaint, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
  2. Fax:   (202) 690-7442; or
  3. Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11555/19/2017
  
The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting in Springfield on Wednesday, May 24.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting in Springfield on Wednesday, May 24.

View the packet for the meeting.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting

May 24, 2017

10:30 a.m.

Illinois State Board of Education

100 N. First St., Springfield

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Presentations & Updates
    1. Illinois Committee for Agricultural Education Update
    2. Illinois Board of Higher Education Update
    3. Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act Update
  4. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: April 13, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 228 (Transitional Bilingual Education)
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 25 (Educator Licensure)
      2. Part 228 (Transitional Bilingual Education)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Intergovernmental Agreement with Regional Office of Education #51 for KIDS Regional Professional Development Consultants and  Professional Development Coordinator
      2. Grant with Illinois State University for the National Board Certification Initiative
      3. Renewal of Intergovernmental Agreement with Illinois State University to Administer the Illinois National Board Professional Preparation and Support System
      4. Intergovernmental Agreement with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Early Childhood Illinois Early Learning Project Website
      5. Teach for America Grant
      6. Early Childhood Block Grant Preschool for All 3-5, Preschool for All 3-5 Expansion, and Prevention Initiative 0-3
    5. *Qualified Zone Academy Bond (QZAB) Authorization
    6. * National Association of State Boards of Education Membership Dues for 2018
      End of Consent Agenda
  5. Closed Session (as needed)
  6. Ratification of the Tentative Agreement Between the Illinois State Board of Education and the Illinois Federation of State Office Educators, Local 3236, IFT-AFT, AFL-CIO
  7. Presentation of the Compliance Examination for the Two Years Ended June 30, 2016
  8. Discussion Items
    1. ESSA Update
    2. District Oversight Update
    3. Legislative Update
    4. Budget Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  9. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  10. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
  11. Adjourn

The Cooking up Change culinary students will serve the State Board lunch following adjournment.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11545/10/2017
  

Charter school will offer families an innovative approach to learning

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced a federally funded $950,000 award to the Elgin Charter School Initiative. The two-part grant will support the opening of the Elgin Math and Science Academy Charter School within School District U-46. The proposed school will focus on closing opportunity and achievement gaps in the Elgin community through the hands-on and explorative Expeditionary Learning (EL) model.
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2017
ELGIN – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today announced a federally funded $950,000 award to the Elgin Charter School Initiative. The two-part grant will support the opening of the Elgin Math and Science Academy Charter School within School District U-46. The proposed school will focus on closing opportunity and achievement gaps in the Elgin community through the hands-on and explorative Expeditionary Learning (EL) model. 

The grant is part of the federally funded Charter Schools Program, through which ISBE can award $42 million total in federal funds to expand the number of high-quality and educationally diverse charter schools in Illinois and evaluate the effects of charter schools on student academic achievement, staff, and parents.

“Congratulations to the Elgin Charter School Initiative and the Elgin community,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “High-quality school options allow families to find the best learning environment for their children’s unique interests and needs. I encourage high-performing charter school operators across the state to consider applying for the next round of Charter Schools Program funds to expand opportunities for more families. I encourage school district leaders to take advantage of the opportunity to bring additional federal funding and high-quality school choices to their communities.”

The Elgin Charter School Initiative will use the $150,000 in Program Design funds and the $800,000 in Initial Implementation funds to provide staff and teachers with intensive supports and training in the EL education model, which encourages students to learn by doing. Educators at the Elgin Math and Science Academy Charter School will shepherd students to be leaders of their own learning and achieve bold goals.

“Our team at the Elgin Charter School Initiative is grateful for the Charter Schools Program funding and for ISBE's vote of confidence in our proposed Elgin Math and Science Academy Charter School,” said Kerin Kelly, president of the Elgin Charter School Initiative. “We are excited to bring a unique math and science charter school based on the EL education model to School District U-46. As an all-volunteer team, the CSP grant will allow us to have a great start and to make important hires prior to our school opening in 2018.”  

ISBE plans to release the next Charter Schools Program Request for Proposals in July.


External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11534/24/2017
  

State Board, Horace Mann Companies, Illinois Association of School Administrators, and Illinois Principals Association recognize superintendents and principals from across the state

Education leaders from around the state convened today to honor 25 outstanding school and district administrators at the third annual Distinguished Administrators Luncheon, co-hosted by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), Horace Mann Companies, the Illinois Association of School Administrators (IASA), and the Illinois Principals Association (IPA).
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2017
SPRINGFIELD – Education leaders from around the state convened today to honor 25 outstanding school and district administrators at the third annual Distinguished Administrators Luncheon, co-hosted by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), Horace Mann Companies, the Illinois Association of School Administrators (IASA), and the Illinois Principals Association (IPA). 

State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., delivered opening remarks at the event, held at The Inn at 835 in Springfield. Smith expressed his deep appreciation for the dedication and leadership of superintendents and principals, who will play a key role in implementing the state’s new accountability and support system under the Every Student Succeeds Act. 
“A healthy school system depends on strong school and district leaders,” said Smith. “The 25 superintendents and principals honored today have shown an outsized and inspirational commitment to students and to their communities. I cannot overstate the importance of school and district administrators to the success of our students, especially as we all transition and grow through Illinois’ Every Student Succeeds Act State Plan. I want to publicly thank our all of our outstanding superintendents and principals.”

Regional colleagues annually select their local Superintendents of Distinction, one in each of the 21 IASA regions, based on leadership for learning, communication, professionalism, and community involvement. Dr. Jason Henry of Sesser-Valier Community Unit School District 196, was recognized as the 2017 Superintendent of the Year at the Joint Annual Conference in November. 

“Some of the best Illinois school leaders serving children, teachers, and communities are being recognized today for their dedicated work towards the maximum educational success for all students,” said Brent Clark, Ph.D., executive director of IASA. 

Education leaders from around the state attended the Distinguished Administrators Luncheon, including Marita Zuraitis, president and chief executive officer of the Horace Mann Companies, a national insurer that focuses on education.

“Our administrators excel at providing a supportive, enriching, and constructive environment to help both students and faculty achieve their best every day,” said Zuraitis. “We are proud to recognize the Superintendents of Distinction and Principal of the Year honorees and support their efforts to find solutions to the many issues schools and educators face every day.” 

IPA encourages community members, teachers, administrators, and board members to nominate outstanding principals and assistant principals within their regions. Regional winners move on to the state level, where a committee of past IPA presidents selects an Elementary Principal of the Year, a Middle School/Junior High School Principal of the Year, a High School Principal of the Year, and an Assistant Principal of the Year.

“These individuals exemplify the best in school leadership,” said Jason Leahy, executive director of IPA. “They are to be commended for their service and dedication to their students, teachers, and communities.”

ISBE, Horace Mann Companies, IASA, and IPA today recognized the following administrators:




External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11524/13/2017
  

Many school districts incurred debt to cover normal operations

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) voted today to approve the Annual Financial Profiles (AFP) for school districts statewide. ISBE created the 2017 AFP by analyzing school districts’ fiscal year 2016 Annual Financial Reports. View the 2017 Annual Financial Profiles at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/School-District-Financial-Profile.aspx.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) voted today to approve the Annual Financial Profiles (AFP) for school districts statewide. ISBE created the 2017 AFP by analyzing school districts’ fiscal year 2016 Annual Financial Reports. View the 2017 Annual Financial Profiles at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/School-District-Financial-Profile.aspx

Statewide in FY 2016, the increase in total operational revenues exceeded the increase in total operational expenditures, leading to a slight increase in school districts’ overall scores for financial strength. However, more than a fourth of all Illinois school districts issued short- or long-term debt to sustain normal operations. School districts pay interest on outstanding debt, which decreases the funds available for education services in the future. Many school districts also eliminated staff and programming to reduce operational costs.

“Illinois school districts’ financial health has improved over the last year, but at what cost to students?” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Illinois must overhaul our school funding model, which is the most inadequate and the most inequitable in the country. Every school district in the state is having to make hard choices to cover the day-to-day costs of keeping their schools’ doors open. Forcing school districts to rely primarily on taxing local property wealth to fund education inherently means the students who need the most will receive the least. We expect dedication, innovation, and improvement from our administrators, educators, and students; we owe them the resources necessary to meet those expectations.”

Statute requires the AFP analysis to count mandated categorical program (MCAT) funds as revenue, though school districts received their final FY 2016 quarterly MCAT payment six months late. School districts have not received any MCAT payments for the first three quarters of FY 2017.

The profiles provide school districts and their stakeholders with information on school districts’ financial integrity. School districts receive a score from 1.00 (lowest financial strength) to 4.00 (highest financial strength) and a corresponding designation (4.00 through 3.54: Financial Recognition; 3.53 through 3.08: Financial Review; 3.07 through 2.62: Financial Warning; and 2.61 through 1.00: Financial Watch).

ISBE developed the AFP in 2003 in consultation with experts in finance and lending, credit agencies, and school district business officials in order to promote sound financial management. The profiles examine five key indicators of financial integrity: fund balance to revenue ratio, expenditure to revenue ratio, days cash on hand, percentage of short-term borrowing ability remaining, and percentage of long-term borrowing ability remaining.

ISBE provides tools and guidance on financial management to all school districts seeking assistance and to school districts designated in Financial Watch.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11514/11/2017
  
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in Chicago and Springfield on Thursday, April 13.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video conference in Chicago and Springfield on Thursday, April 13.​

View the packet for the meeting at https://www.isbe.net/Documents_Board_Meetings/20170413-packet.pdf.

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting

April 13, 2017

9 a.m.

Chicago Location:
ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location: 
ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor
100 N. First St., Springfield

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

AGENDA

  1. Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Public Participation
  3. Closed Session
  4. Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: March 15, 2017
    2. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 1 (Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition and Supervision)
      2. Part 20 (Standards for Endorsements in Elementary Education)
      3. Part 26 (Standards for Endorsements in Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education)
    3. *Rules for Withdrawal
      1. Part 50 (Evaluation of Educator Licensed Employees Under Articles 24A and 34 of the School Code)
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. Renewal of Contract for Co-Project Manager of Illinois Longitudinal Data System Project
      2. Intergovernmental Agreement with Sangamon-Menard Regional Office of Education #51 for Field Monitors
      3. Intergovernmental Agreement Extension with Illinois State University for Implementation of the Illinois Learning Standards
      4. Intergovernmental Agreement with Peoria County Regional Office of Education #48 for the Illinois Virtual School
    5. *Special Education Expenditure and Receipts Report
    6. *Statewide Single Audit
    7. *Passing Score for the Four Middle Grades (5-8) Content Tests for Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Sciences
      End of Consent Agenda
  5. Review of Financial Profile Analysis
  6. Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman's Report
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. ISBE Fiscal & Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
  9. Adjourn
External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11504/4/2017
  

Plan outlines new statewide system of support for schools and framework for measuring school quality

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has submitted Illinois’ state plan outlining a new, school-level accountability framework to the U.S. Department of Education (ED). The plan presents a new vision of evaluating and supporting public schools in Illinois under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has submitted Illinois' state plan outlining a new, school-level accountability framework to the U.S. Department of Education (ED). The plan presents a new vision of evaluating and supporting public schools in Illinois under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). 

View a visual one-pager and presentation describing key elements of the plan at https://www.isbe.net/essa.

Read the complete plan submitted to ED at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/ESSA-Draft-Report.aspx

In developing Illinois' ESSA State Plan, ISBE created three drafts; hosted approximately 100 listening tour forums across the state; engaged hundreds of advocates and stakeholder groups representing educators, administrators, school support staff, parents, and concerned citizens; and received and considered more than 3,500 comments online. The State Board unanimously approved the plan March 15. The plan also received Governor Bruce Rauner's signature and support. 

“I am tremendously proud of the collaborative work ISBE staff and stakeholders have engaged in over the past 16 months to create our ESSA State Plan," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Submitting our ESSA State Plan to ED is only the beginning. ISBE will remain in constant dialogue with our stakeholders as we continue to implement ESSA in Illinois. We will refine and adjust our plan when necessary and work together to improve all schools and improve outcomes for all students. 

“Our stakeholders identified key principles to guide the design of our new accountability system. Accountability should be educative, providing information the school community can learn from; equitable, recognizing the unequal circumstances of Illinois' students and educators; non-punitive, seeking to support struggling schools; and should consider multiple measures of school quality, beyond just academic attainment," said Smith. “We took every comment and recommendation to heart. 

“Our ESSA State Plan portrays a multi-dimensional picture of learning and supports the whole child as she or he develops," said Smith. “Our accountability system considers school climate, fine arts, chronic absenteeism, college and career readiness, and English Learner proficiency, in addition to academic growth, graduation rate, and attainment. Our plan places new emphasis on growth and focuses on sustaining school improvement through leadership and capacity building, rather than short-term gains. 

“We have an extraordinary opportunity to transform public education in Illinois," said Smith. “I look forward to continuing this journey."  

The 2017-18 school year will serve as a transition year, as ISBE continues to implement ESSA in Illinois. 


Measuring School Quality 

ESSA requires states to measure school quality through two categories of indicators: academic indicators and school quality/student success indicators. ESSA requires the academic indicator group to outweigh the school quality/student success indicator group. 

Based on robust stakeholder engagement and feedback, Illinois' new school quality framework consists of the following indicators and weights: 


​Category
​Elementary (P-8)
High School (9-12)
​Core Academic Indicators (75%)
  • ​PARCC and Dynamic Learning Maps Alternative Assessment (2018-19: English Language Arts 10%; Math 10%) (thereafter: ELA 7.5%; Math 7.5%)
  • Growth: Linear Regression (50%)
  • English Learner Proficiency (ACCESS) (5%)
  • Science (2018-19: 0%) (thereafter: 5%)​

  • ​SAT (2018-19: ELA 10%; Math 10%) (thereafter: ELA 7.5%; Math 7.5%)
  • Graduation (4-, 5-, and 6-year rates) (50%)
  • English Learner Proficiency (ACCESS) (5%)
  • Science (2018-19: 0%) (thereafter: 5%)​

School Quality/ Student Success Indicators (25%)
  • ​Chronic Absenteeism (10%)
  • Climate Survey (5%)
  • Fine Arts (2018-19: 0%) (>0% by 2021-22)
  • P-2 Indicator (5%)
  • Elementary/Middle Indicator (5%)​

  • ​Chronic Absenteeism (7.5%)
  • 9th Grade on Track (6.25%)
  • College and Career Ready (6.25%)
  • Climate Survey (5%)
  • Fine Arts (2018-19: 0%) (>0% by 2021-22)​

​​Growth will account for 50 percent of a school's accountability framework. Valuing academic growth over simple proficiency or attainment recognizes equity as the primary driver to closing achievement and opportunity gaps.  

The inclusion of the fine arts indicator in the school quality framework demonstrates the importance of stakeholder feedback throughout the ESSA State Plan drafting process. Weighting the fine arts indicator initially at 0 percent allows ISBE to collect data on fine arts at every school across the state without harming the schools currently lacking sufficient resources to provide fine arts. ISBE will study the data collected in order to determine and implement an educative, non-punitive, and equitable fine arts measure and weight by 2021-22. 

ISBE will build upon its acclaimed Illinois Report Card (www.illinoisreportcard.com) to communicate a multi-faceted picture of school quality to families and communities. 


Summative Designations 

ESSA requires states to provide a single summative designation for each school to help families and communities understand how students and schools are performing as a whole.  

Illinois' summative designations, beginning with the 2018-19 school year, consist of the following four tiers:  

  • Tier 1: Exemplary School: A school that has no underperforming subgroups, a graduation rate of greater than 67 percent, and whose performance is in the top 10 percent of schools statewide. Schools with the Tier 1: Exemplary designation may apply to join the IL-EMPOWER network of partners. 
  • Tier 2: Commendable School: A school that has no underperforming subgroups, a graduation rate greater than 67 percent, and whose performance is not in the top 10 percent of schools statewide. Schools with the Tier 2: Commendable designation may apply to join the IL-EMPOWER network of partners. 
  • Tier 3: Underperforming School: A school in which one or more subgroups is performing at or below the level of the “all students" group in the lowest 5 percent of Title I schools. Schools with the Tier 3: Underperforming designation must receive targeted support, though not exclusively through IL-EMPOWER. 
  • Tier 4: Lowest Performing School: A school that is in the lowest-performing 5 percent of Title I schools in Illinois and those high schools that have a graduation rate of 67 percent or less. Schools with the Tier 4: Lowest Performing designation must receive comprehensive support through IL-EMPOWER. 

Illinois' summative designations explicitly examine academic performance between student demographic groups to ensure overall achievement cannot mask achievement or opportunity gaps. 

In addition to receiving a descriptive summative designation, every school will receive a grade specifically for growth, based on an A through F scale beginning with the 2019-20 school year. ISBE will base the grade on an annual comparison of schools to other similar schools in the state. The grade will highlight the schools achieving remarkable gains and ensure the accountability framework does not disadvantage any school for its local context. 


Supporting All Schools: IL-EMPOWER 

IL-EMPOWER is Illinois' new statewide system of support for all schools. IL-EMPOWER strives to allow the lowest performing schools more flexibility to choose the evidence-based improvement strategies that will work best in their local context. IL-EMPOWER also places greater emphasis on sustaining improvement by building capacity and leadership. Any school accessing support through IL-EMPOWER will: 

  • Conduct an equity audit and a needs assessment to determine opportunities for growth in specific areas: Governance and Management, Curriculum and Instruction, and Climate and Culture;
  • Select a partner from a pre-approved and cost-controlled network;
  • Create a four-year improvement plan with quarterly reporting to ISBE; and
  • Build capacity and leadership, optimize resources, and ensure sustainability beyond the four years of the initial partnership. 

    Schools with Tier 1: Exemplary and Tier 2: Commendable designations may apply to coach other schools as members of the pre-approved network of partners.  

    ISBE, through the IL-EMPOWER structure, can hold both schools and partners accountable for improving student outcomes. Partners that do not meet agreed upon goals may lose pre-approval status.  

    Current Focus Schools and Priority Districts will receive support through IL-EMPOWER for the 2017-18 school year, as the transition to IL-EMPOWER begins. The new school-level summative designations will replace Focus Schools and Priority Districts beginning with the 2018-19 school year.


Opportunities for Educators 

Illinois' ESSA State Plan recognizes teacher leadership as a critical lever to improving student outcomes and sustaining school improvement.  

ISBE will launch two competitive grant programs: 
  • Thirty-, 60-, and 90-day teacher-led research projects, through which educators will investigate a problem of practice important to teacher leadership and report out the findings.
  • Innovative fieldwork partnerships between districts and higher education institutions with approved teacher education programs aimed at providing teacher candidates with diverse and extended opportunities to develop their craft with practicing educators.  ​

​ISBE will continue to develop professional learning resources on critical topics and to connect leaders across districts through the online, on-demand professional learning community Ed Leaders Network. 


Next Steps

​ED has 120 days to facilitate peer reviewing of Illinois' ESSA State Plan and to provide feedback on and/or approve the plan.

ISBE will engage legislators in crafting the necessary legislative changes and rulemaking to operationalize the plan in statute. 

ISBE will initiate work groups to develop specific outstanding components of the ESSA State Plan, including:  ​

  • Reviewing IL-EMPOWER partner applications and awarding pre-approval;
  • Developing the preschool to second grade school quality indicator;
  • Developing the elementary/middle grade school quality indicator;
  • Finalizing the college and career indicator;
  • Developing reporting requirements for the fine arts indicator;
  • Working with the Technical Advisory Council to develop the growth indicator and grade scale;
  • Enhancing data systems to allow for school-level financial data collection and reporting; and
  • Assisting districts in creating local Title I plans.


External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11494/3/2017
  

​Ten school districts selected to participate in Illinois’ first-ever competency-based learning pilot

Illinois State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., today announced the 10 school districts selected to participate in the first cohort of Illinois’ Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. Smith celebrated the pioneering districts at an event at Manual Academy in Peoria Public Schools District 150, which will launch its first competency-based course in the 2018-19 school year.
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2017
PEORIA – Illinois State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D., today announced the 10 school districts selected to participate in the first cohort of Illinois’ Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot Program. Smith celebrated the pioneering districts at an event at Manual Academy in Peoria Public Schools District 150, which will launch its first competency-based course in the 2018-19 school year.

Each school district chosen to participate in the pilot will create a competency-based learning and credit system of the district’s design. In competency-based learning, educators assess and advance students based on demonstrated mastery of specific skills, abilities, and knowledge, rather than on time in the classroom. Competency-based learning allows for a potentially more relevant and personalized learning experience for students, in addition to deeper integration of technology and better utilization of teacher talent.

“The way we prepare students for college and career must evolve if we want to fuel a thriving economy and healthy communities,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “When students leave our schools, they should leave with the keys to open multiple doors, any of which can lead to a successful future. In Illinois, although 86 percent of students graduate high school in four years, only 46 percent of students demonstrate college readiness. While 71 percent of our high school graduates enroll in a postsecondary institution within 16 months, 49 percent of students enrolling in our community colleges have to take remedial courses, which makes graduating from college take longer, cost more, and be less likely.”

“The 10 school districts participating in the first cohort of the Competency-Based High School Graduation Requirements Pilot are opening new doors for students and educators,” said Smith. “These districts are modeling the future I want to see in Illinois – innovative, led by educators, supportive of the whole child and of every student reaching their full potential, and with schools at the center of healthy communities.”
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) launched the pilot program to spur innovation in the way high schools prepare students for meaningful careers and to support Illinois’ goal of increasing the proportion of adults in Illinois with high-quality degrees and credentials to 60 percent by the year 2025. The Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act, passed unanimously by both legislative chambers and signed into law by Governor Bruce Rauner, established the pilot program in 2016.

The school districts participating in the first cohort of the pilot include:
  • Peoria Public Schools District 150
  • Huntley Community School District
  • Rantoul Township High School District 193
  • Williamsfield Community Unit School District 210
  • Kankakee School District 111
  • Proviso Township High School District 209
  • East St. Louis School District 189
  • Ridgewood High School District 234
  • Round Lake Community Unit School District 116
  • Six schools in Chicago Public Schools District 299
    • Benito Juarez Community Academy High School
    • Lindblom Math & Science Academy
    • Brooks College Prep
    • Walter Payton College Preparatory High School
    • Consuella B York Alternative High School
    • South Side Occupational High School
All of the participating districts have created local Planning and Implementation Committees and plans to engage their communities and stakeholders in the development and implementation of their competency-based learning systems.

ISBE will foster an open learning community and provide an online library of research, technical assistance, and models to support the first cohort of the pilot and encourage more districts to apply for future cohorts.

No state funding has been appropriated in the current fiscal year for this pilot program. ISBE has requested $1 million in Fiscal Year 2018 to help support the development of the pilot program. The application for the next cohort will open later in 2017.
Learn more about the pilot and the participating districts’ plans at https://www.isbe.net/competency​.



UNDERFANGER AMANDA
11483/29/2017
  
2016-17 SAC members investigated mental health awareness in schools and presented to State Board
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the application for the 2017-18 Student Advisory Council (SAC). SAC members learn about education issues in Illinois and provide feedback to the State Board. The students also research a topic of their choosing and present their findings at a State Board meeting. Any student starting the upcoming school year as a sophomore, junior, or senior in an Illinois public high school may apply. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Friday, May 26.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today released the application for the 2017-18 Student Advisory Council (SAC). SAC members learn about education issues in Illinois and provide feedback to the State Board. The students also research a topic of their choosing and present their findings at a State Board meeting. Any student starting the upcoming school year as a sophomore, junior, or senior in an Illinois public high school may apply. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Friday, May 26.

"ISBE values the voices and perspectives of students," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "The Student Advisory Council's research findings and feedback help inform ISBE's policies and advocacy. SAC offers high school students a meaningful opportunity to engage around issues they see and experience every day and to learn from and collaborate with students from different backgrounds. I encourage students interested in government, policy, and public service to consider applying for the SAC and sharing their valuable voices with ISBE."

The 2016-17 SAC examined the lack of awareness of mental health issues in Illinois public schools. The SAC's presentation to the State Board March 15 explored ways to strengthen connections between students, teachers, counselors, and administrators and improve students' academic, social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. View the presentation at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Student-Advisory-Council.aspx.

"SAC has given us a forum in which we can actually help influence policy," said SAC member Sung "Shawn" Park, a senior at Metea Valley High School in Aurora. "Not only was it wonderful seeing other like-minded students in a room where we could discuss our shared passion, but we actually saw our work come to tangible benefits. SAC has inspired me to keep working in the public service field."

Kathleen Rock, a member of the 2016-17 SAC and a junior at Byron High School, described her experience as motivating and inspiring.

"Being able to meet and work with such a diverse group of students has allowed me to become a better thinker," said Rock.

ISBE established the SAC in 1975. Applicants undergo a competitive review process and must demonstrate strong interpersonal skills and the ability to think creatively, work well in groups, and develop innovative solutions to complex problems.

The following seven 2016-17 SAC members plan to return to the council for the 2017-18 school year:

NameSchoolCityGrade
Neha ArunCarterville High SchoolCarterville10
Oliver BerraraNorth Chicago Community High SchoolNorth Chicago11
Evan BlievernichtTeutopolis High SchoolTeutopolis11
Bridget HarrisBelvidere North High SchoolBelvidere11
Kevin D. LittleNiles West High SchoolSkokie11
Kathleen RockByron High SchoolByron11
Elizabeth WardenBeardstown High SchoolBeardstown11

The 2017-18 SAC will have nine open spots, vacated by the following graduating seniors:

NameSchoolCity
Seetha Aribindi Hinsdale Central High SchoolWillowbrook
Stella Cole Springfield High SchoolSpringfield
Archit DharNeuqua Valley High SchoolNaperville
Morgan FleckWilliamsville High SchoolWilliamsville
Breeze KeppyParis High SchoolParis
Gloria OladipoWhitney M. Young MagnetChicago
Darcy PalderJones College Prep SchoolChicago
Sung "Shawn" ParkMetea Valley High SchoolAurora
Hannah SunderlandKnoxville High SchoolDahinda

Rock, who plans to return to the council for the 2017-18 school year, said next year's SAC members should "come ready to work and be open to new ideas and experiences."

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11473/16/2017
  

Design by Oswego High School junior Lia Lauck claims first place; Des Plaines' Anna Schultz wins second; and Johnsburg's Heidi Fischer takes third

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) honored the first-place winner of the statewide poster contest for Illinois Arts Education Week, Oswego High School junior and Advanced Placement Studio Art student Lia Lauck. (See photos from the board meeting below.) Governor Bruce Rauner designated March 13-19, 2017, Illinois’ 35th annual Arts Education Week. The weeklong celebration recognizes the importance of fine arts to a complete and competitive education for the whole child.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) honored the first-place winner of the statewide poster contest for Illinois Arts Education Week, Oswego High School junior and Advanced Placement Studio Art student Lia Lauck. (See photos from the board meeting below.) Governor Bruce Rauner designated March 13-19, 2017, Illinois' 35th annual Arts Education Week. The weeklong celebration recognizes the importance of fine arts to a complete and competitive education for the whole child.

The statewide poster contest for Illinois Arts Education Week alternates between elementary/middle and secondary students each year. This year, students in ninth through twelfth grades created posters reflecting the theme, “Art Has No Boundaries!"

“Fine arts education empowers students to express their understanding and experiences through multiple modes," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Through the practice and study of fine arts, students learn critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creative problem solving – essential skills for college and career readiness. Illinois Arts Education Week reminds us to celebrate fine arts in our schools and communities. Thank you to all of the participants in Illinois Arts Education Week, and congratulations to the talented winners of the poster contest and their amazing teachers."

The resolution passed by the State Board at its regular business meeting March 15 also recognizes Lauck's art teacher Michael Skura, Oswego High School principal Mike Wayne, and Oswego Community Unit School District 308 Superintendent Dr. John Sparlin for valuing fine arts in education and encouraging students' self-expression and cross-cultural understanding.

Lauck's winning poster design involves intricate and mixed media drawing using both colored pencils and pen and ink. Lauck's artist statement says she found inspiration in the work of poet Nayyirah Waheed.

The back of the poster contains information about the Illinois Learning Standards for fine arts, which go into effect beginning with the 2018-19 school year; upcoming fine arts events in 2017; and resources about the impact of fine arts in forming a well-rounded education.

Anna Schultz, a 17-year-old junior taught by Michele Morris at The Willows Academy in Des Plaines, won second place in the poster contest. Heidi Fischer, a 16 year-old junior taught by Judy Krueger at Johnsburg High School in Johnsburg School District 12, received third place in the poster contest.

All of the 2017 poster contest winners will receive recognition at the 69th annual Illinois Art Education Association Fall Conference Dec. 2 in St. Charles. 

The Illinois State Board of Education sponsors Illinois Arts Education Week in conjunction with Governor Rauner and the Illinois Art Education Association, a professional nonprofit organization for art educators, individuals, and groups supporting visual arts education.

Visit www.isbe.net/Pages/Arts-Week.aspx to view the winning poster and learn more about the competition. Request a 2017 Arts Education Week poster from ISBE's College and Career Readiness Division at (217) 524-4832, arts@isbe.net, or via mail at 100 N. First St., C-215, Springfield, IL 62777-0001.

Arts Week Winner 

2017 Illinois Arts Education Week poster contest winner Lia Lauck with Board Chairman James T. Meeks and State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D.

Arts Week Winner and Family 

​2017 Illinois Arts Education Week poster contest winner Lia Lauck with her family, principal, and art teacher, Board Chairman James T. Meeks, and State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersBILDILLI LORI
11463/10/2017
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting in Springfield Wednesday, March 15.   
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced the following agenda for its regular business meeting in Springfield Wednesday, March 15.   

All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent's office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting

March 15, 2017

9:30 a.m.

Illinois State Board of Education

100 N. First St., Springfield

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

​AGENDA

I.      Roll Call/Pledge of Allegiance

    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means

II.    Public Participation

III.   Resolutions and Recognition

    1. Illinois Arts Education Week Poster Winner, Lia Lauck

IV.  Presentations and Updates

    1. Student Advisory Council Final Presentation

V.    Superintendent's Report - Consent Agenda

  1. *Approval of Minutes
    1. Plenary Minutes: February 22, 2017
  2. *Rules for Initial Review
    1. Part 401 (Special Education Facilities)
  3. *Contracts and Grants Over $1 Million
    1. Statewide System of Support: IL-EMPOWER
    2. Early Childhood Block Grant: Department of Human Services Home Visiting Programs

      End of Consent Agenda
  4. State Educator Preparation and Licensure Board Appointment

VI.  Every Student Succeeds Act State Plan

VII. Discussion Items

  1. Legislative Update
  2. Budget Update
  3. Other Items for Discussion

VIII.            Closed Session

IX.  Approval of Closed Session Minutes

X.    Announcements and Reports

  1. Superintendent's/Senior Staff Announcements
  2. Chairman's Report
  1. Member Reports

XI.  Information Items

  1. ISBE Fiscal and Administrative Monthly Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)

XII. Adjourn​

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11453/7/2017
  

Princeville parent shares his family's experiences with summer school for migrant students

More than 7,200 seasonal agricultural or migrant workers travel to Illinois each year. The children in migrant families face unique challenges to staying on track academically. The federally funded Migrant Education Program (MEP) supports organizations providing educational services to migrant children.
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2017
SPRINGFIELD – More than 7,200 seasonal agricultural or migrant workers travel to Illinois each year. The children in migrant families face unique challenges to staying on track academically. The federally funded Migrant Education Program (MEP) supports organizations providing educational services to migrant children. 

Illinois has $1 million in federal MEP funds available for summer programs in fiscal year 2017. Organizations seeking funds must apply by Friday, March 10.

“Illinois’ migrant families support our state’s critical agricultural industries. We have a responsibility to all children to make them feel welcome and supported in Illinois,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Illinois’ Every Students Succeeds Act State Plan sets specific and measureable goals for migrant students’ success to ensure they are never overlooked or left behind by our schools. The Migrant Education Program showcases how states can work together to prepare all students for college and career.” 

Most of Illinois’ migrant families come for the summer to work in agriculture and then return to their home states. MEP provides comprehensive educational services during the summer months and supplemental support during the regular school year. 

Migrant student achievement needs to increase by 25 percent in both reading and math to close the performance gap between migrant and non‐migrant students. MEP helps children overcome the educational disruption, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, and health issues associated with frequent moves. 

Jose Montalvo, a parent of three whose son attends a MEP summer school, shared some of his experiences with the program.

“I am very grateful for the help Illinois has provided. I work at Seneca Foods and process pumpkins. My family has been coming to Princeville from Texas since 1990. Because of the migrant program, my 12-year-old son, Jose Angel, is doing well in school and has friends in both states,” said Mr. Montalvo.

“The school staff here have been very accessible and receptive to us. The process for enrolling has been made very simple. The program provides my son with books, supplies, and even meals. I always, always recommend the program to other families. I like to participate, and our kids reap the benefits.”

Learn more about the Migrant Education Program administered by the Illinois State Board of Education at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Migrant-Education-Program.aspx​.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11442/28/2017
  

New approaches and partnerships for the development, administration, and scoring of Illinois Science Assessment maintain quality while reducing costs 

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has partnered with Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIU) on a groundbreaking new process for scoring a large-scale student academic performance assessment. More than 400,000 Illinois students took the Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) for the first time in spring 2016. The new assessment not only satisfied federal accountability requirements, but also provided ISBE with the opportunity to innovate on the traditional assessment model from top to bottom, while maintaining quality and reducing costs.
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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has partnered with Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIU) on a groundbreaking new process for scoring a large-scale student academic performance assessment. More than 400,000 Illinois students took the Illinois Science Assessment (ISA) for the first time in spring 2016. The new assessment not only satisfied federal accountability requirements, but also provided ISBE with the opportunity to innovate on the traditional assessment model from top to bottom, while maintaining quality and reducing costs.

Budgetary uncertainty at the state level delayed the start of the scoring process for ISA, but the scoring process is now underway. ISBE expects schools to have spring 2016 assessment results in summer 2017. 

The results of the summative science assessment will provide educators and administrators with additional data to inform broad curriculum adjustments at the school and district levels to ensure Illinois students build a cohesive understanding of science over time. Since the ISA is not a formative assessment, educators will not use the results to make teaching adjustments year-to-year for individual students. The delayed results will not affect individual students’ learning or their prospects for success on the 2017 administration of ISA. 

“We are building a trusted and sustainable assessment infrastructure from the ground up,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Illinois students will benefit from the return on our investment in a cost-efficient, fully aligned, and locally developed assessment system. The process of hand-scoring delivers valuable professional development to Illinois educators and science experts. Partnering with a local research institution, instead of outsourcing the hand-scoring to an out-of-state vendor, keeps both the work and the institutional knowledge of scoring the exams within Illinois.”  

SIU will engage science experts and Illinois educators licensed to teach science in hand-scoring the 1.3 million ISA test items. Educators also will engage in the standards-setting process to occur at the conclusion of this first year of scoring. In the future, Illinois educators will have the opportunity to receive training on assessment item development, assessment statistics, and item evaluation. 

“We’re pleased to collaborate with the Illinois State Board of Education to oversee this important project,” said SIU System President Randy Dunn. “ISBE clearly recognizes the importance of ongoing assessment to reinforce the quality of education statewide.”

ISBE developed the ISA through new methods and by forging new partnerships. District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) provided test items aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards for inclusion in ISA, which also aligns to the Illinois Learning Standards. The ISBE Information Technology Division created a new assessment administration user interface that automatically updates student records in near real time and replaces the time-intensive manual rostering required by other assessment programs. ISBE partnered with Illinois-based software company BreakThrough Technologies to develop the ISA using software from an open-source platform, resulting in the elimination of licensing fees and significant resource savings.  

“The partnership taps into SIU Carbondale’s strengths in science education,” said Interim SIU Carbondale Chancellor Brad Colwell. “We are honored to have this opportunity to extend our long, successful history supporting Illinois education at all levels.”

ISBE has made enhancements to the ISA platform based on educator and administrator feedback in preparation for the spring 2017 administration. Enhancements include expanding test administration to more devices and improving the test management system. 

School districts across Illinois will administer the ISA in spring 2017 to students in fifth and eighth grades and once at the high school level. The high school assessment utilizes a course-based model with content aligned to Biology I.
External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11432/23/2017
  
New data from the College Board showcase Illinois’ commitment to closing equity gaps in rigorous high school courses
The College Board has released data on the participation and performance of the graduating class of 2016 on Advanced Placement (AP) exams. Illinois continues to report record numbers of graduates both taking and excelling on AP exams, with Joliet Township High School District 204 receiving the prestigious District of the Year award for its outstanding performance among all small-sized school districts in the United States and Canada.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The College Board has released data on the participation and performance of the graduating class of 2016 on Advanced Placement (AP) exams. Illinois continues to report record numbers of graduates both taking and excelling on AP exams, with Joliet Township High School District 204 receiving the prestigious District of the Year award for its outstanding performance among all small-sized school districts in the United States and Canada.

"AP exams have a proven track record of giving students a valuable head start in their college coursework and can save students time and money toward earning their college degrees," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Equity in Illinois means all students have the opportunity to learn at high levels and demonstrate their academic capacity. Congratulations to Joliet Township High School District 204 Superintendent Dr. Cheryl McCarthy and all of the dedicated teachers and hardworking students who came together to achieve such remarkable gains."

Highlights from the College Board data for Illinois' graduating class of 2016 include:

  • Illinois ranks 10th among all states in the country for the percentage of the statewide graduating class of 2016 scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam during high school.
  • The percentage of graduates who took an AP exam during high school has grown from 20.2 percent of the graduating class of 2006 to 37.5 percent of the graduating class of 2016.
  • As the number of students taking AP tests has grown, so has the number of students excelling on AP tests. Illinois ranks fourth in the nation for the growth in the percentage of graduates earning a 3 or higher on an AP exam during high school. Illinois' percentage has grown by 10.8 points over the past 10 years from 14.3 percent of the graduating class of 2016 to 25.1 percent of the graduating class of 2016.
  • Twenty-one Illinois school districts made the prestigious AP District Honor Roll for increasing access to AP coursework while simultaneously maintaining or increasing the percentage of students earning scores of 3 or higher on AP exams. View the full AP District Honor Roll list.
  • Fifteen of Illinois' AP Honor Roll districts have made the Honor Roll for multiple years.
  • The College Board named Joliet Township High School District 204 the College Board Advanced Placement District of the Year among small-sized school districts based on an analysis of three academic years of AP data. The College Board chose three AP Districts of the Year — one for each category of district population size: small, defined as having fewer than 8,000 students; medium; and large — out of the 433 school districts across the United States and Canada on the annual AP District Honor Roll.
  • Joliet Township High School District 204 increased its percentage of traditionally underrepresented AP students earning a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam by 7 percent annually — an increase of 83 students since 2014. Fifty-five percent or more of the AP students in the district are American Indian, African American, Hispanic/Latino, or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander; 42 percent or more of the AP students in the district qualify for free or reduced-price lunch.

"At Joliet Township High School, we have the philosophy that Advanced Placement classes are for all of our students, not just our honors or highest achieving students," said Dr. McCarthy, the Joliet superintendent. “We work closely with our sender school districts and our teachers to identify students who have the potential to experience success in an AP class. With the guidance of our Strategic Plan, Joliet Township High School has made a concentrated effort to increase the number of students enrolled in AP classes through the implementation of the SpringBoard curriculum and by providing AP Academic Camps during the summer and support throughout the school year. I believe that this mindset, along with the support we provide, are key contributors to our Advanced Placement gains."

View photos from Joliet Township High School District 204's AP District of the Year celebration.

Illinois leads the nation in efforts to eliminate gaps for low-income students and students of color in the most rigorous high school courses. The Illinois State Board of Education at its December 2016 meeting approved an agreement with the College Board to maintain the cost of taking AP tests at $15 per exam for low-income students, compared to the normal test fee of $93, for the May 2017 test administration.

Illinois became the first state in the nation to partner with the Lead Higher Initiative, committing to a statewide challenge to close equity gaps for low-income students and students of color in AP, International Baccalaureate, and dual-enrollment courses.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11422/22/2017
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) and the Chicago Urban League today finalized a settlement agreement in the matter of the Chicago Urban League, et al. v. Illinois State Board of Education, pending in the Circuit Court of Cook County. The settlement agreement resolves this longstanding litigation by establishing how ISBE will proceed when the General Assembly fails to enact an appropriation sufficient to pay for all General State Aid (GSA) claims submitted by school districts.
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2017

CHICAGO – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) and the Chicago Urban League today finalized a settlement agreement in the matter of the Chicago Urban League, et al. v. Illinois State Board of Education, pending in the Circuit Court of Cook County. The settlement agreement resolves this longstanding litigation by establishing how ISBE will proceed when the General Assembly fails to enact an appropriation sufficient to pay for all General State Aid (GSA) claims submitted by school districts.

In response to the settlement agreement, Illinois State Board of Education Chairman James T. Meeks issued the following statement:

"The case settled today addresses one of the many symptoms caused by the State’s education funding system that is failing Illinois’ students. ISBE deeply appreciates Governor Bruce Rauner and the General Assembly for their ongoing efforts to reform the core problem of Illinois’ inadequate and inequitable education funding system. ISBE will continue to base all of its decisions on the best interests of individual school districts and their students to ensure that the whole child receives a high-quality education in a safe, secure, and supportive educational environment. ISBE remains hopeful that the General Assembly will enact funding reform during this legislative session to guarantee that no students ever have to settle for less than they deserve."

The Chicago Urban League filed the lawsuit in April 2008 challenging the constitutionality and equitability of the State’s education funding system. After the Court dismissed the State as a party and all constitutional claims, the Chicago Urban League specifically challenged ISBE’s use of “proration” during Fiscal Years 2013 through 2015. Specifically, in those years, when the General Assembly failed to appropriate sufficient funds to pay for the total amount of GSA owed to school districts, ISBE managed the shortfall by decreasing all school districts’ GSA payments by an equal across-the-board percentage. Expert witnesses for each party analyzed the Chicago Urban League’s claim and disagreed as to whether any disparity in funding caused by proration was significant.

ISBE has at all times denied any liability or wrongdoing in this lawsuit, and the parties agreed to settle to avoid the burden, costs, and distraction of continued litigation.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11412/17/2017
  
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video-conference in Chicago and Springfield Wednesday, Feb. 22.
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2017
SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education has announced the following schedule for its regular business meeting via video-conference in Chicago and Springfield Wednesday, Feb. 22. 
All State Board of Education meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons planning to attend who need special accommodations should contact the Superintendent’s office no later than one day prior to the meeting. Contact the Superintendent's office at the State Board of Education by phone at (217) 782-2221, TTY/TDD at (217) 782-1900, or fax at (217) 785-3972.

Chairman James Meeks may call for a break in the meeting as necessary in order for the Board to go into closed session.

State Board of Education Meeting 
Feb. 22, 2017
9 a.m.

Chicago Location:        ISBE Video Conference Room, 14th Floor
                                      100 W. Randolph St., Chicago

Springfield Location:   ISBE Video Conference Room, 3rd Floor 
                                       100 N. First St., Springfield 

This meeting will be audio cast on the internet at www.isbe.net.

AGENDA
  1. RollCall/Pledge of Allegiance
    1. Consideration of and Possible Actions on Any Requests for Participation in Meeting by Other Means
  2. Swearing-In of Board Members
  3. Public Participation
  4. Election of Board Officers
  5. Superintendent’s Report - Consent Agenda
    1. *Approval of Minutes
      1. Plenary Minutes: January 24, 2017
    2. *Rules for Initial Review
      1. Part 25
    3. *Rules for Adoption
      1. Part 1
    4. *Contracts & Grants Over $1 Million
      1. IL_EMPOWER
      2. KIDStech University of California-Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center (BEAR Center)
    5. *2016 Spring Waiver Report
    6. *Fiscal Year 2016 Appropriation Transfer from Special Education Personnel to Special Education Transportation
    7. *Settlement Agreement in the Matter of the Chicago Urban League, et al. v. Illinois State Board of Education
      End of Consent Agenda
  6. ​Discussion Items
    1. District Oversight Update
    2. Legislative Update
    3. Budget Update
    4. Every Student Succeeds Act Update
    5. Other Items for Discussion
  7. Announcements & Reports
    1. Superintendent’s/Senior Staff Announcements
    2. Chairman’s Report /li>
      1. Appoint Chair for Finance and Audit Committee
      2. Appoint Chair for Education Policy Planning Committee
    3. Member Reports
  8. Information Items
    1. Fiscal & Administrative Reports (available online at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Illinois-State-Board-of-Education-Fiscal-and-Administrative-Reports.aspx)
  9. Closed Session (as needed)
  10. Adjourn​​

​​
External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11402/9/2017
  
Haines Elementary School principal shares keys to Chicago school’s success
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) nominated Haines Elementary School as one of 54 National Title I Distinguished Schools for 2016. The National Title I Distinguished Schools Program celebrates schools receiving Title I funds for outstanding achievements in three categories: Category One, for exceptional student performance for two or more consecutive years; Category Two, for significantly closing the achievement gap between student groups; and Category Three, for excellence in serving special populations of students (e.g., homeless, migrant, English Learners, etc.). Haines Elementary School has demonstrated exceptional student performance for two consecutive years, earning the school a nomination in Category One.
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2017

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) nominated Haines Elementary School as one of 54 National Title I Distinguished Schools for 2016. The National Title I Distinguished Schools Program celebrates schools receiving Title I funds for outstanding achievements in three categories: Category One, for exceptional student performance for two or more consecutive years; Category Two, for significantly closing the achievement gap between student groups; and Category Three, for excellence in serving special populations of students (e.g., homeless, migrant, English Learners, etc.). Haines Elementary School has demonstrated exceptional student performance for two consecutive years, earning the school a nomination in Category One.

ISBE will honor Haines Elementary School at the annual Statewide Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Conference Feb. 13 in Chicago.

Title I is the cornerstone of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), reauthorized in 2015 as ESSA, and funds services for struggling students in school districts that serve low-income communities. Ninety-two percent of students at Haines Elementary School qualify as low-income, 30 percent are English Learners, and 99.7 percent are students of color. The number of students meeting or exceeding standards in both English language arts and mathematics on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers exam rose from 60 percent in 2015 to 64 percent in 2016, compared to the state average of 34 percent in 2016.

​​​"Haines Elementary School shows us that all students can thrive in school," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. "I encourage administrators and educators across the state to examine the approaches Haines takes to overcoming barriers to achievement. We can ensure each and every student reaches their full potential by learning from the example of Illinois’ exemplary Title I schools."

Haines Elementary School Principal Catherine Amy Moy credits her school’s success to a student-centered approach. Teachers and staff have high expectations for all students. Project- and problem-based learning helps students make real-world connections to the material in their classrooms. Students and teachers work together to set data-informed goals and develop plans to meet or exceed all academic targets.

Teachers at Haines collaborate weekly, have the opportunity to participate in purposeful and ongoing professional development, and receive recognition for all of their accomplishments. Haines fosters open communication with students’ families through a monthly newsletter and accessible after-school events.

"Thank you to all of the students, teachers, staff, and families in the Haines learning community for working together to achieve such extraordinary success year after year," said Moy. "Teachers have an opportunity to change students’ lives daily. We strive to support our teachers in taking risks and taking ownership of their professional growth. Throughout the entire Haines learning community, we work to trust each other, inspire one another, and take action daily so every child learns."

The full interview with Moy and an interactive map of all of the 2016 Distinguished Schools will be available on the National Title I Association website at http://www.titlei.org/ds.

Representatives from Haines also will attend the 2017 National Title I Conference Feb. 22 in Long Beach, Calif.

"Title I provides indispensable support to struggling students in schools serving low-income communities," said ISBE Division Administrator for Title Grants Melina Wright. "We are excited that the new system of support outlined in Illinois’ ESSA State Plan will be able to leverage the successes of schools such as Haines to make the most of our Title I dollars."

The National Title I Association is a membership-based organization for Title I state directors that helps to improve and implement programs under Title I of ESEA. The National Title I Association established the National Title I Distinguished Schools Program in 1996.

Watch a video showcasing the exciting activities at Haines Elementary School and learn more about the Distinguished Schools Program in Illinois on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Distinguished-Schools.aspx.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11392/7/2017
  
Grants part of $42 million federally funded effort to increase number of high-quality charter schools in Illinois and study their effects
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) released the second request for proposals (RFP) for grants awarded through the federally funded Charter Schools Program (CSP). ISBE administers the $42 million Charter Schools Program for the purpose of expanding the number of high-quality and educationally diverse charter schools in Illinois and evaluating the effects of charter schools on student academic achievement, staff, and parents. Funds available in fiscal year 2017 total more than $7 million.
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2017

The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) released the second request for proposals (RFP) for grants awarded through the federally funded Charter Schools Program (CSP). ISBE administers the $42 million Charter Schools Program for the purpose of expanding the number of high-quality and educationally diverse charter schools in Illinois and evaluating the effects of charter schools on student academic achievement, staff, and parents. Funds available in fiscal year 2017 total more than $7 million.

Design teams working with school districts to propose new charter schools and charter schools in their first two years of operation may apply through CSP for financial assistance. Applicants can seek funding for program design, community engagement, start-up costs, and curriculum materials. Find information about accessing the electronic RFP on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Pages/Charter-Schools.aspx. Proposals are due by 4 p.m., Monday, March 20.

Every single student deserves access to a quality education. Illinois supports creative thinking and the taking of responsible risks to meet the evolving needs of students and families,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “I encourage all eligible charter school teams to apply for CSP grants to help expand educational opportunities for all students. I also encourage parents, educators, and administrators across the state to consider the availability of CSP funds in evaluating the potential of a new public charter school in your communities.”

The RFP requires applicants to submit detailed plans for involving families and community members in the design of the school, attracting underserved students and addressing their needs, recruiting and retaining diverse and high-quality staff, overcoming barriers to equitably serving students with special needs, aligning curriculum with the Illinois Learning Standards, and implementing rigorous accountability mechanisms.

ISBE awarded the first CSP grants in fall 2016 to ASPIRA Business and Finance, LEARN Charter Network (for two schools), and Frazier Preparatory Academy, based on a thorough application process and three external reviews.

External CommunicationsBILDILLI LORI
11381/30/2017
  

Video spotlights on Summer Meals sponsors:

Champaign-Urbana Public Health Districthttps://vimeo.com/199276559

Aurora Townshiphttps://vimeo.com/189295532


The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a statewide call for school districts, local government entities, and non-profit organizations to help ensure every child has access to nutritious meals during the summer months. ISBE administers the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), also known as Summer Meals, to provide free meals and snacks to children when schools are not in session.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today issued a statewide call for school districts, local government entities, and non-profit organizations to help ensure every child has access to nutritious meals during the summer months. ISBE administers the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), also known as Summer Meals, to provide free meals and snacks to children when schools are not in session. 

School districts, local governments, and nonprofits can sponsor SFSP sites, housing the summer food programs at schools, parks, recreation centers, housing projects, migrant centers, churches, summer camps, and other locations. SFSP sponsors manage and develop their own sites and receive federal reimbursement via ISBE to cover the administrative and operating costs of preparing and serving meals. ISBE offers online trainings on topics such as financial management, system navigation, and menu planning.​ 

Entities interested in becoming a SFSP sponsor should contact ISBE's Nutrition and Wellness Programs Division at (800) 545-7892 or cnp@isbe.net and register for a mandatory new sponsor workshop at http://webprod1.isbe.net/cnscalendar/asp/eventlist.asp. ISBE will host new sponsor training workshops 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.:

  • March 8 in Marion
  • March 29 in Alsip
  • April 12 in Peoria
  • April 19 in Schaumburg
  • April 26 in Fairview Heights
  • May 17 in Springfield 

“Childhood hunger affects almost every community in this state," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “ISBE is very proud to administer the Summer Food Service Program in Illinois. We count on SFSP sponsors and meal sites across the state to play a vital role in helping children get the nutritious meals they need to be ready to learn when they return to school in the fall." 

For every 100 children who receive meals through the National School Lunch Programs (NSLP), only 14 received meals over the summer. Although 172 SFSP sponsors and 135 Seamless Summer Option sponsors administered over 2,200 meal sites in 2016, Illinois' children need many more sponsors to provide access to healthy food in every county in the state. Illinois currently has 36 counties with no SFSP meal sites. 

“We know it can be a challenge to feed multiple kids when they are home for the summer," said Brandon Meline, Director of Maternal and Child Health at the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, an SFSP sponsor in Illinois. “We have been thrilled to have the opportunity to help families in our community save valuable food dollars. With us as the sponsor doing the administrative work, we have inspired other community partners to provide meal sites, too." 

ISBE partner organizations No Kid Hungry and the Illinois Hunger Coalition staff a calling and texting hotline to refer families to their nearest meal sites. Interested families can call (800) 359-2163, text “FoodIL" to 877-877, or visit SummerMealsIllinois.org. ​

Current SFSP sponsors should register for a current sponsor workshop at http://webprod1.isbe.net/cnscalendar/asp/eventlist.asp.

### 

Civil Rights Non-Discrimination Statement
In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. 

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. 

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at https://www.ascr.usda.gov/how-file-program-discrimination-complaint, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

        1. Mail:   U.S. Department of Agriculture
                       Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
                       1400 Independence Avenue, SW
                       Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

  1. Fax:     (202) 690-7442; or
  2. Email:  program.intake@usda.gov. ​

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

External CommunicationsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
11371/24/2017
  
State Board requests increase of $266.4 million over fiscal year 2017 levels
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today finalized its fiscal year 2018 budget recommendations for pre-K through 12th grade educational services providers statewide. ISBE’s total budget recommendations amount to $7.727 billion, an increase of $266.4 million (3.45 percent) over FY 2017 levels.
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2017

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today finalized its fiscal year 2018 budget recommendations for pre-K through 12th grade educational services providers statewide. ISBE's total budget recommendations amount to $7.727 billion, an increase of $266.4 million (3.45 percent) over FY 2017 levels. 

ISBE held three public hearings in different parts of the state to gather feedback on spending needs and priorities. ISBE formulated its budget recommendations based on the testimony of educators, students, and community members and adhered to three key principles: aligning with ISBE's goals; advocating for the needs of children across the state, as identified through requests from the field; and recognizing the need for universal and differentiated support to meet the unique needs of each and every child in the state. 

“The budget request approved by ISBE today strives to meet the needs of students, families, and school districts," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “ISBE remains committed to the vision of Illinois as a state of whole, healthy children nested in whole, healthy systems supporting communities wherein all citizens are socially and economically secure. Every school district in Illinois is advocating for the resources they need to educate and care for every student in their community.  This request represents an investment in our children, our communities, and our state. We look forward to sharing local stories and successes with the General Assembly as they consider this request." 

ISBE recommends fully funding General State Aid (GSA) in FY 2018 at the Foundation Level of $6,119 per student, while maintaining the current GSA appropriation of $5.078 billion. The Foundation Level represents the mandated minimum level of funding required to meet the basic education needs of one student in the Illinois pre-K through 12th grade public school system. 

Other highlights from the budget request approved by ISBE today include:

  • An increase of $50 million for Early Childhood Education, as incorporated into the federal Preschool Expansion grant agreement to increase access to quality, effective services for the most at-risk children in the state;
  • An increase of $38.4 million to fully fund bilingual education programs serving the growing number of English Learners in the state; and
  • Increases in funding to support special education, arts and foreign language programs, agricultural education, broadband expansion and other digital technology enhancements, Career and Technical Education, teacher mentoring and diverse educator recruitment, Advanced Placement exam fees for low-income students, and other critical investments that contribute to the college and career success of all Illinois students.  

ISBE will submit its recommended budget to the Illinois General Assembly before Feb. 17. 

View ISBE's complete FY 2018 budget recommendations on the ISBE website at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/FY18%20Brd%20Req%20web%20posting.pdf



External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersUNDERFANGER AMANDA
113012/27/2016
  
Grants part of $42 million federally funded effort to increase number of high-quality charter schools in Illinois and study their effects
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has awarded three nonprofit public charter school operators grants through the federally funded Charter Schools Program (CSP). The grants will total $2.1 million over two years and support start-up costs and curriculum materials at four schools in their initial years of operation.
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2016

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has awarded three nonprofit public charter school operators grants through the federally funded Charter Schools Program (CSP). The grants will total $1.2 million over two years and support start-up costs and curriculum materials at four schools in their initial years of operation.

 

ISBE administers the $42 million Charter Schools Program for the purpose of expanding the number of high-quality and educationally diverse charter schools in Illinois and evaluating the effects of charter schools on student academic achievement, staff, and parents.

 

ISBE awarded the first CSP grants to ASPIRA Business and Finance, LEARN Charter Network (for two schools), and Frazier Preparatory Academy, based on a thorough application process and three external reviews. Each awardee submitted detailed plans for involving families and community members in the design of the school, attracting underserved students and addressing their needs, recruiting and retaining diverse and high-quality staff, and implementing rigorous accountability mechanisms.

 

“Congratulations to ASPIRA Business and Finance, LEARN Charter Network, and Frazier Preparatory Academy," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “Our public schools must adapt to meet the evolving needs of students and families in a changing world. I thank all of the applicants and awardees of the Charter Schools Program grants for bringing creative thinking and innovative design to the table to expand opportunities for Illinois students. I encourage educators and administrators across the state to consider the potential of a new public charter school in their community and apply for the next round of CSP grants."

 

The first three CSP awardees will use the grant funds to increase learning opportunities for students, provide professional development for teachers, and promote family engagement:

  • ASPIRA Business and Finance (ABF) – Committed to preparing students with the tools they need to succeed in postsecondary education, careers, and beyond. The business and entrepreneurship foci promote financial literacy, career preparation, and 21st-century readiness. ABF serves a student population that is more than 94 percent students of color, 96 percent eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, and 90 percent future first-generation college students.
  • LEARN Charter Network campuses 7 and 8 Strives to provide children with the academic foundation and ambition to earn a college degree. As a steppingstone to LEARN 8 Middle School, LEARN 7 Elementary School serves students in kindergarten through grade 5 and provides scholars with a strong primary foundation to excel in high-quality, college prep high schools. LEARN 8 Middle School serves students in grades 6 through 8. LEARN Charter Network has developed a system of learning that ensures consistent and effective student-centered instruction.
  • Frazier Preparatory Academy Dedicated to providing parents in high-need communities with a high-quality public school option. Frazier Preparatory Academy's educational program personalizes learning for all students by maximizing integration of exceptional classroom teaching with innovative blended learning technologies and enrichment opportunities.

 

ISBE plans to release the next Charter Schools Program Request for Proposals for both design and initial implementation grants in January 2017.​


External CommunicationsNewsUNDERFANGER AMANDA
112912/22/2016
  
EFAB recommends raising per-pupil Foundation Level to $9,204
The Illinois Education Funding Advisory Board (EFAB) today submitted its regular biennial education funding recommendations to the Illinois General Assembly, in accordance with the Illinois School Code.
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2016

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Education Funding Advisory Board (EFAB) today submitted its regular biennial education funding recommendations to the Illinois General Assembly, in accordance with the Illinois School Code. In its report, EFAB recommends increasing the statutory per-pupil Foundation Level from the current amount of $6,119 to $9,204 for fiscal year 2018. The Foundation Level establishes the mandated minimum per-pupil funding achieved through a mix of state and local funds. Statute requires the State to provide school districts with the difference between the Foundation Level and a district’s local wealth, as calculated by the equalization Formula Grant, in addition to providing the Supplemental Low-Income Grant, based on a district’s percentage of low-income students.

As stated in the report, in 11 of the past 15 years, the State has not met its statutory obligation to fully fund the Foundation Level and the components of the low-income grant, resulting in the State prorating or paying only a portion of the amount owed to districts through their General State Aid claims.

“EFAB renews its commitment to advocating for the state to end its failure to meet its constitutional responsibilities to adequately fund public education,” said Board Chair Sylvia Puente, echoing statements made by EFAB in its report. “Increasing funding for basic education in Illinois will be a challenge, but it is a challenge we ask every policymaker and citizen to embrace. The children of Illinois deserve no less. We ask our policymakers to note that in each of the years that the state has failed to meet its obligations, school districts must continue to meet all of the statutory requirements imposed upon them. This situation should not be allowed to continue.”

Comparison of GSA Claim Amounts to Funds Appropriated for GSA  

EFAB’s recommended increase to the Foundation Level would require $4.6 billion in additional funding in fiscal year 2018, or almost double the current appropriation for public education.

In its report, EFAB acknowledges the efforts of both the General Assembly and Governor Rauner to increase funding in both FY 2016 and FY 2017 and to revise how the state sends funding to districts; yet, EFAB also implores the General Assembly and the Governor to work together to increase the resources available for public education, in order to offer Illinois children the tools they deserve and need to compete in a global economy. The General Assembly and the Governor last adopted the EFAB recommendation in FY 2002. Since then, the increases in the Foundation Level have failed to keep pace with EFAB recommendations. The current Foundation Level of $6,119 has remained the same since FY 2010.

Current members of the Education Funding Advisory Board include Sylvia Puente (executive director of the Latino Policy Forum; Chicago), Sheila Harrison-Williams (superintendent of Hazel Crest School District 152.5; Hazel Crest), Cinda Klickna (president of the Illinois Education Association; Springfield), and Daniel Montgomery (president of the Illinois Federation of Teachers; Westmont). The Board has one vacancy.

External CommunicationsNewsBILDILLI LORI
112812/9/2016
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today advanced an important and continuing dialogue with communities throughout the state on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) by releasing the second Reader’s Guide for Illinois’ draft ESSA State Plan and launching a new online engagement forum, developed in partnership with the nonprofit policy support network Partners for Each and Every Child (Partners for).
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2016

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today advanced an important and  continuing dialogue with communities throughout the state on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) by releasing the second Reader’s Guide for Illinois’ draft ESSA State Plan and launching a new online engagement forum, developed in partnership with the nonprofit policy support network Partners for Each and Every Child (Partners for).

Partners for Each and Every ChildISBE will submit the next draft of the Illinois ESSA State Plan to Governor Bruce Rauner’s office Feb. 1 and then to the U.S. Department of Education April 3. ISBE will gather public input on the draft ESSA State Plan through Dec. 27.

“Now is the time to unlock the unique potential of our diverse state,” said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We have strong school-community partnerships and experienced educators who can come together to create and implement a state plan that improves outcomes for all students and benefits our entire country. Feedback is essential as ISBE staff and stakeholders seize this opportunity to work together in charting our collective path forward.”

Illinois’ ESSA State Plan is intended to meet the requirements ESSA, the new federal education law. ISBE developed the draft ESSA State Plan based on stakeholder feedback received at three statewide listening tours and hundreds of comments submitted online. The evolving document refines an accountability framework that fulfills the educational equity and excellence goals for all students in Illinois.
A NEW READERS GUIDE: The second draft of Illinois’ ESSA State Plan builds on feedback received on the previous draft of the plan. ISBE produced a Reader’s Guide in partnership with Partners for to assist all stakeholders in understanding the plan. The Reader’s Guide accompanies the draft Illinois ESSA State Plan to showcase:

  • Changes from Draft Plan #1 and how community feedback has been incorporated;
  • Important statutory provisions of ESSA;
  • How ISBE’s thinking has evolved, based on stakeholder input;
  • Questions that still remain to be addressed; and
  • Resources to further explore remaining issues and key decision points. 

A NEW ONLINE ENGAGEMENT PLATFORM: EngageforSchools.org is an online platform facilitating engagement in the education policymaking process. Launched in partnership with Partners for Each and Every Child, EngageforSchools.org focuses on Illinois ESSA planning and implementation. ISBE encourages all stakeholders to download the ESSA State Plan Reader’s Guide to maximize utility of the platform.
ONGOING INPUT: Regularly updated information regarding ESSA can be found at www.isbe.net/essa. Stakeholders are encouraged to provide feedback on the draft plan by emailing essa@isbe.net through Dec. 27.

Speaking about the need for thoughtful collaboration in a time of significant uncertainty, Superintendent Smith said, “We are focused on leveraging the immediate challenge to advance educational equity for students. In Illinois, we are taking full advantage of the opportunities which ESSA allows and requires. It is up to all of us now - liberals and conservatives, families and educators, community organizers and labor representatives - to forge a new consensus on successful schools for each and every child. ISBE is committed to getting the tools and resources to do so into the hands of our communities.”
         
Christopher Edley Jr., chair of Partners for Each and Every Child and founder/president of the Opportunity Institute, added, “States must lead the way on equity in education, especially considering it is unclear how strong a role the U.S. Department of Education will play in overseeing ESSA implementation. Partners for applauds ISBE’s efforts to regularly, thoughtfully, and deliberately engage with a diverse base of stakeholders in the development of a better, stronger, and more collaborative state educational accountability system.”

Partners for Each and Every Child is a project of The Opportunity Institute. Its mission is to build an infrastructure of interconnected work that will encourage a growing portion of the education policy community to break down barriers to advance sound educational policies; to address matters of equity; and to respond to the needs of at-risk, underserved, and politically underrepresented students.

External CommunicationsAdministrators; Community & Partners; Families & Students; TeachersNewsBILDILLI LORI
113512/9/2016
  
The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today advanced an important and  continuing dialogue with communities throughout the state on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) by releasing the second Reader’s Guide for Illinois’ draft ESSA State Plan and launching a new online engagement forum.
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2016

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) today advanced an important and  continuing dialogue with communities throughout the state on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) by releasing the second Reader's Guide for Illinois' draft ESSA State Plan and launching a new online engagement forum.

The next draft of the Illinois ESSA State Plan heads to Governor Bruce Rauner's office Feb. 1 and then to the U.S. Department of Education April 3. ISBE will gather public input on the draft ESSA State Plan through Dec. 27.

“Now is the time to unlock the unique potential of our diverse state," said State Superintendent of Education Tony Smith, Ph.D. “We have strong school-community partnerships and experienced educators who can come together to create and implement a state plan that improves outcomes for all students and benefits our entire country. Feedback is essential as ISBE staff and stakeholders seize this opportunity to work together in charting our collective path forward."

Illinois' ESSA State Plan is intended to meet the requirements of the new federal education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA); respond to and integrate several consistent themes from the first round of feedback; and refine an accountability framework that fulfills the educational equity and excellence goals for all students in Illinois. ISBE developed the draft ESSA State Plan based on stakeholder feedback received at three statewide listening tours and hundreds of comments submitted online.

A NEW READERS GUIDE: The second draft of Illinois' ESSA State Plan builds on feedback received on the previous draft of the State Plan. To assist all stakeholders in understanding the plan, ISBE produced a Reader's Guide in partnership with the nonprofit policy support network Partners for Each and Every Child (Partners for). The Reader's Guide accompanies the draft Illinois ESSA State Plan to showcase:

  • Changes from Draft Plan #1 and how community feedback has been incorporated;
  • Important statutory provisions of ESSA;
  • How ISBE's thinking has evolved--based on stakeholder input--on discrete issues;
  • Questions that still remain to be addressed; and
  • Resources to further explore remaining issues and key decision points. 

A NEW ONLINE ENGAGEMENT PLATFORM: EngageforSchools.org is an online platform facilitating engagement in the education policymaking process. Launched in partnership with Partners for Each and Every Child, EngageforSchools.org focuses on Illinois ESSA planning and implementation. ISBE encourages all stakeholders to download the ESSA State Plan Reader's Guide [LINK] to maximize utility of the platform.

ONGOING INPUT: Regularly updated information regarding ESSA can be found at www.isbe.net/essa.  Stakeholders are encouraged to provide feedback on the draft plan by emailing essa@isbe.net through Dec. 27.

Speaking about the need for thoughtful collaboration in a time of significant uncertainty, Superintendent Smith said, “We are focused on leveraging the immediate challenge to advance educational equity for students. In Illinois, we are taking full advantage of the opportunities which ESSA allows and requires. It is up to all of us now - liberals and conservatives, families and educators, community organizers and labor representatives - to forge a new consensus on successful schools for each and every child. ISBE is committed to getting the tools and resources to do so into the hands of our communities."

         

Christopher Edley Jr., chair of Partners for Each and Every Child and founder/president of the Opportunity Institute, added, “States must lead the way on equity in education, especially considering it is unclear how strong a role the U.S. Department of Education will play in overseeing ESSA implementation. Partners for applauds ISBE's efforts to regularly, thoughtfully, and deliberately engage with a diverse base of stakeholders in the development of a better, stronger and more collaborative state educational accountability system."

Partners for Each and Every Child is a project of The Opportunity Institute. Its mission is to build an infrastructure of interconnected work that will encourage a growing portion of the education policy community to break down barriers to advance sound educational policies; to address matters of equity; and to respond to the needs of at-risk, underserved, and politically underrepresented students.

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