{{CurrentPage.Topics.DisplayName}} {{CurrentPage.Subtopic_x0020_Level_x0020_1}}

{{CurrentPage.Title}}

 Stage A

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Describe an observed science concept using appropriate senses, making applicable estimations and measurements, predicting steps or sequences, describing changes in terms of starting and ending conditions using words, diagrams or graphs.
  2. Begin guided inquiry asking questions using prior knowledge and observations, inferring from observations to generate new questions, or developing strategies to investigate questions.
  3. Conduct guided inquiry following appropriate procedural steps and safety precautions as directed by teacher.
  4. Collect data for guided inquiry identifying and using instruments for gathering data, making estimates and measurements, recording observations, or reading data from data-collection instruments.
  5. Record and store data assembling pictures to illustrate data, or organizing data on charts and pictographs, tables, journals or computers.
  6. Analyze and display results recognizing and describing patterns, noting similarities and differences in patterns, or predicting trends.
  7. Communicate individual and group results identifying similar data from others, generalizing data, drawing simple conclusions, or suggesting more questions to consider.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Propose ideas for solutions to technological design questions asking questions about concept (e.g., how to demonstrate that sound is produced by vibrating objects), identifying criteria for measuring success of design or prioritizing possible solutions from given list.
  2. Select a possible solution which addresses the design question choosing materials from teacher-generated options, determining the order of assembly steps, identifying the variables for testing criteria factors, proposing procedural steps to test design or sketching the projected final design.
  3. Construct the selected technological solution using the materials and tools provided or recording observational data for design process.
  4. Test for design success based on teacher-generated criteria conducting multiple trials or collecting data from tests using appropriate measurement methods.
  5. Communicate results of design tests comparing data from student trials to evaluate design success, reporting the procedures followed, evaluating best design to solve technological design question or proposing modifications for design solution in additional trials.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce basic needs, characteristics and component parts of living things, comparing living and non-living things, describing basic needs and characteristics of living things, sorting the common key structures and functions for animal and plant groupings, classifying common animals by size, color, family units, and shape, and explaining the rationale for the grouping, or distinguishing common physical characteristics or structures for groupings of animals or plants with regard to seasonal, age changes and parent characteristics.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the relationships of living things to their environment, identifying the common characteristics of habitats, matching the needs of organisms in local and global habitats.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore how living things are dependent on one another for survival, identifying the survival needs of plants and animals, matching groupings of animals (e.g., lion's pride, gaggle of geese, herds, packs), predicting what would happen to organisms when their environmental resources are changed (i.e., seasonally or climatically), or explaining how humans adapt to their environments.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine forms of energy, exploring sources and types of energy in familiar situations, experimenting with sounds by vibrating different materials, exploring ways that heat, light and sound are produced naturally and artificially.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the states and properties of matter, comparing solids, liquids and gases and how they change states, or sorting objects by similar large-scale physical properties.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore simple forces around us, describing how push or pull may affect the motion of objects, classifying materials by their magnetic attraction or repulsion, or sorting examples of simple machines.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the simple concepts of motion, changing the position and motion of objects or showing simple inertia and momentum in real-world applications.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce the Earth's land, water and atmospheric components, sorting pictures of different land features, identifying the basic features of globes or maps, classifying major sources or uses of water, or sketching atmospheric features seen in the sky over time.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce weather and seasonal changes, collecting daily weather data, predicting local weather conditions based on collected data, associating seasonal variations of weather data, or creating pictographs or other graphic displays of local weather patterns.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to classify renewable and non-renewable natural resources, sorting different examples of simple natural resources, identifying the origin of these examples with their recyclable possibilities, or setting and working toward a possible recycling or reusing goal for classroom application effort.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the familiar objects of the solar system, identifying the easily visible components, exploring their relative sizes using scale models, recording daily and/or nightly moon sightings, or introducing space mission studies.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the explanations of the daily and annual patterns of the Earth's motion, recording observations of the daily path of the sun over time, comparing shadows during a day, or observing the daily and seasonal differences of the day and night sky.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply the appropriate principles of safety using established classroom safety, order and cleanliness rules during science inquiry or design investigations, applying general science rules in home and playground settings, role-playing what should be done in case of fire, explaining when and why electricity can be harmful and helpful, or reinforcing decision-making skills related to the promotion and protection of individual health.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind valuing the importance of recording scientific data accurately and honestly in inquiry and design investigations, comparing observations by different students observing the same activity, proposing reasons for differences in observations, or reporting data from repeated observations across timed intervals.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply the use of appropriate scientific tools in inquiry or design investigations using instruments for measuring length and temperature, or recording values with accuracy.
  2. Explore the contributions of men and women in the life, environmental, physical, earth and space sciences identifying individuals and their discoveries or inventions, or explaining how scientists have advanced our knowledge in real life.
  3. Describe ways that science and technology are found in real-world situations identifying familiar jobs and careers from science fields, inferring the impact of science and technologies in their lives, identifying how technologies make work easier, faster or more efficient, or describing ways that scientists are working to solve problems.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of conservation and the need to protect natural resources identifying types and causes of pollution, listing materials that can be recycled, or suggesting ideas for reducing, reusing, or recycling renewable resources.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.A is aligned to standard 11A, stage A (first grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.A - Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11A.A - Collecting Family DataPDF Document
    Students will apply the process for guided inquiry through an introductory activity to record and store data, then analyze and display their results.
  • 11B.A - Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.A - Major FunctionsPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to introduce the basic needs, characteristics and component parts of living things.
  • 12B.A - What Living Things NeedPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to explore how living things are dependent on one another for survival.
  • 12C.A - Sound and MotionPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of technological design to examine sound energy.
  • 12D.A - Magnetic PropertiesPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to explore simple forces around us.
  • 12E.A - Weather Where We ArePDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to explore local weather and seasonal changes.
  • 12F.A - Me and My ShadowPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiries or technological design to explore the explanations of the daily patterns of the Earth’s rotation.
  • 13A.A - Basic SafetyPDF Document
    Students should demonstrate awareness of how to use basic safety practices.
  • 13B.A - Science ToolsPDF Document
    Students will apply the uses of scientists’ tools in scientific inquiry and technological design investigations.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage B

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Describe observed science event, sequencing processes or steps, choosing/proposing causes or effects based on observations, or using measurable and descriptive attributes and units.
  2. Begin guided inquiry investigations about objects, events, and/or organisms that can be tested, asking pertinent questions, predicting conditions that can influence change, or determining simple steps to follow to investigate selected question(s).
  3. Conduct guided inquiry assembling proper materials and equipment, or following appropriate procedural steps and safety precautions.
  4. Collect data for investigations, choosing and using appropriate instruments and units, recording data on classroom charts, tables, journals or on computers, or sorting or modifying pictures or drawings that illustrate data.
  5. Analyze results investigation, organizing data on graphs or charts, constructing reasonable and accurate explanations from data, or applying qualitative and quantitative terminology that describes observed data patterns.
  6. Communicate results of individual and group investigation, matching similar data from other data sources, identifying reasons for differences or discrepancies in the data, selecting data that can be used to predict future events or data trends, or generating questions for possible future inquiry investigations.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Propose ideas for solutions to technological design problem, asking questions about causes and effects of concept to model or test (e.g., how to test 'if-then' effects of magnets, batteries, sound, buoyancy), identifying criteria for measuring success of design, or prioritizing possible solutions from given list.
  2. Begin a design solution, choosing procedural steps for construction and testing from teacher-generated options, suggesting the variables for testing criteria factors, or sketching the projected final design.
  3. Construct the selected technological design using the materials and tools provided, recording anecdotal data from design process, or evaluating construction success.
  4. Test for design success based on teacher-or student-generated criteria conducting multiple trials, or collecting data from tests using appropriate measurement methods.
  5. Communicate results of design tests presenting group results which include data from student trials to evaluate design success in testing scientific principle, procedures followed, suggestions for second round of design, or evaluating best design to solve technological problem.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore common and diverse structures and functions of living things, describing how plants and animals obtain energy, categorizing animals by structures for food-getting and movement, comparing how plants and animals live and reproduce, associating common plant products with plant structures and functions, or comparing common and distinctive plants' or animals' growth cycles, structures and functions.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the impact of plants and animals in their changing environments, identifying factors that affect animal and plant growth and reproduction, or matching plant and animal adaptations to changing seasons or climatic changes.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine how plants and animals (including humans) survive together in their ecosystems describing the food chains or webs in various ecosystems, identifying local habitats, or identifying predator/prey and parasite/host relationships.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to demonstrate energy sources constructing and testing simple electrical circuits with batteries, demonstrating how sound is produced by vibrating objects, or analyzing which energy sources power different objects.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, identifying component materials in objects, classifying objects or materials according to variable masses, volumes, temperatures, and states, or constants such as texture, odor, magnetism and buoyancy.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare and contrast common forces around us dramatizing the ways that forces cause action and reaction behaviors of common objects, distinguishing the work of simple machines, describing the attraction and repulsion of magnetic and electrical fields, or sorting examples of natural or man-made forces.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to make connections between the basic concepts of motion to real world applications describing how gravity affects motion, demonstrating the rate, time and distance factors and units for speed, or describing examples of inertia and momentum in the classroom, playground and at home.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to demonstrate the properties of Earth's basic materials describing different types and uses of Earth's rocks, soils and minerals, identifying major sources/locations of water on the planet, or identifying major Earth and atmospheric features from photographs including those from satellites.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the natural processes that change Earth's surface modeling erosion processes in various soil compositions, or comparing different water flow models for weathering impact, or identifying water cycle in local weather conditions and features.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine various renewable or non-renewable resources comparing different paper, glass or plastic composition examples, collecting data about paper, glass or plastic consumption at school over time, or predicting futuristic resource uses and availabilities.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to describe the main bodies in the solar system identifying the sizes, distances, and relationships of them, relating Earth's dependence on the Sun for heat and light, modeling the phases of the Moon, or suggesting how and why people have studied and explained the solar system through time.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the seasonal and annual motions of the Earth and other planets in relation to the Sun, modeling the Earth's motion in relation to the Sun during the day, night, year, introducing the comparative orbits of planets in the solar system, relating the moon's orbit to its observed phases, or using constellation models to explain apparent changes in the night sky.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply the appropriate principles of safety explaining the dangers of electricity to applicable classroom and home situations, refraining from tasting unknown substances, mapping pathways to leave classroom or home in case of fire or severe weather situations, or identifying safety hazards associated with classroom science inquiry or design investigations.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind proposing ways to test student-generated predictions for science-conceptual relationships, practicing how scientists generate questions for possible studies, relating knowledge that was gained through careful, repeated observations by classmates, or distinguishing hypotheses from guesses.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply the use of appropriate scientific technologies in inquiry and design investigations selecting appropriate technologies for measuring and recording data, comparing accuracy of estimations and precise measurements, sequencing appropriate steps for instructed use of equipment, or investigating the technology of measuring time in history.
  2. Correlate careers and avocations in life, environmental, physical, earth and space sciences to important historical events and ordinary daily life studying applicable personal interest stories, or reporting on specific examples of how scientists or technologists have affected society.
  3. Describe the science connections to the fields of transportation, medicine, agriculture, sanitation, communication associating these fields to pertinent life, environmental, physical, earth and space science concepts, describing ways sciences and technology have affected societal problems in the past, present and projected future, identifying types and causes of pollutions, or applying the practices of reducing, reusing, or recycling renewable resources.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.B is aligned to standard 11A, stage B (second grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.B - Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11B.B - Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.B - What Do Parts Do?PDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to explore common and diverse structures and functions of living things.
  • 12B.B - HabitatsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to explore the impact of plants and animals in their changing environments.
  • 12C.B - Build a BoatPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to compare qualitative and quantitative properties of matter.
  • 12D.B - Magnetic ForcePDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to compare and contrast common forces.
  • 12E.B - Weather WhysPDF Document
    Students will apply scientific inquiries to examine the natural processes that change the earth’s surface by identifying the water cycle in local weather conditions and features.
  • 12F.B - Moon JournalPDF Document
    Students will apply scientific inquiries to describe the main bodies in the Solar System by observing and documenting the phases of the moon.
  • 13A.B - Safety MappingPDF Document
    Students will apply the appropriate principles of safety.
  • 13B.B - The Three R's - Recycle, Reuse or ReducePDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to identify ways to classify and conserve our resources.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​​

 Stage C

​​

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Describe an observed (cause and effect) science experience or situation using the appropriate attributes, units and tools, classifying observations into characteristic, sequential or cause-and-effect categories, or describing phenomenon in terms of starting and ending conditions, types of changes.
  2. Devise inquiry investigation brainstorming possible questions for investigation consideration, prioritizing questions for inquiry, wording questions into appropriate hypotheses, choosing the procedural steps, or creating data collection format to address selected hypothesis.
  3. Collect data from inquiry investigations selecting and using the appropriate data-gathering instruments, or measurable unit, reading and recording data into student-created tables, charts, or journals.
  4. Analyze results or data pattern noting similarities and differences, summarizing for cause or effect, constructing reasonable and accurate explanations of data, or identifying reasons why similar investigations may not always have the same results.
  5. Communicate conclusions from individual and group results displaying appropriate data analysis tables and charts, describing patterns from personal and group data, proposing causes or effects from data comparisons, or suggesting additional questions from analyzed procedures, similarities, discrepancies, or conclusions.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Describe an observed cause and effect technological design dilemma generating critical and creative questions associated with design dilemma (e.g., how to test the effect of friction, or how light is reflected, or how toy cars accelerate), recording observations into sequential or cause and effect categories, or describing dilemma in terms of starting conditions, types of changes and ending conditions.
  2. Begin design investigation of cause and effect dilemma describing design conditions of the phenomenon that can be influenced by change, brainstorming possible questions related to causes and effects of phenomenon, prioritizing design options for design investigation, generating success criteria, or choosing the procedural steps to address selected design plan.
  3. Construct design prototype selecting the appropriate materials, designing necessary data tables for addressing success criteria, or using materials and tools provided.
  4. Collect data from prototype testing recording multiple incremental data sets and procedural observations, or keeping accurate procedural journals and drawings.
  5. Display and analyze results summarizing individual data patterns, constructing reasonable and accurate explanations of data, identifying reasons why different designs can accomplish the same effect differently.
  6. Communicate design conclusions from individual and group results describing patterns from data tables, evaluating designs according to design success criteria, or generating design modifications from analyzed procedures, similarities, discrepancies, or conclusions.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore past and present life forms and their adaptations classifying plant and animal groupings according to simple taxonomy guides or characteristics (e.g., locomotion, color, habitat, reproduction), categorizing body structures of living organisms to those from fossil studies, suggesting why changes over time for individuals and groupings of plants and animals happened, or matching the basic organs and functions of major human body systems.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore past and current ecosystems matching fossils of extinct organisms to their probable past ecosystems, comparing extinct organisms and their past ecosystems to plants and animals that live in current comparable ecosystems.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the interdependence of organisms in ecosystems, identifying adaptations that help animals survive in specific or multiple environments, describing the interaction between living and non-living factors in an ecosystem, or predicting what can happen to organisms if they lose different environmental resources or ecologically related groups of organisms.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the flow of energy, measuring variations of heat absorption or reflection in objects, comparing qualitative data about friction, contrasting the transmission of sound through different materials, describing how energy in different forms affects common objects in common events, experimenting with the reflection of light, or analyzing simple wave studies.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze simple properties and changes matching examples of physical and chemical properties to common substances (e.g., mixtures, solutions, solids, liquids, gases), categorizing common changes according to physical and chemical groupings, or explaining common examples of changes in terms of their physical or chemical nature.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the concepts of motion, dramatizing rate, time and distance factors for objects in constant motion, or accelerating in a straight line (on flat or inclined surfaces) and/or in circular paths.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the characteristics of forces comparing examples of gravitational pull on earth, introducing the concepts associated with weightlessness (or more exactly, in continuous free fall) in space flight, diagramming the directions of forces affecting motion in common examples, or exploring how simple machines work.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze Earth's land, water and atmosphere as systems classifying samples of the major rock families, sorting soil types based on their formation and composition, illustrating nature's oxygen and water cycles, or identifying the major components of air.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine weather patterns observing local, state, regional or national weather patterns, identifying topographic features which affect weather patterns, comparing simple models of Earth tilt and revolution to major seasonal changes, or predicting future weather conditions.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare natural resource availability creating tests for decomposition of paper, glass or plastic samples, mapping natural resources from around the world (Mideast oil, Illinois coal, US pine lumber, etc.), or evaluating impact of reducing, recycling or reusing projects at home and at school.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the main bodies of the solar system, describing the surface conditions and composition of the planets, modeling the impact of meteorites on solar system bodies, introducing gravitational force of bodies, or researching how 21st century scientists study the solar system.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the Earth's motions in space, modeling the three-dimensional rotation and revolution of Earth in its orbit, including its axial tilt to introduce the explanation of seasons and solar/lunar eclipses, or addressing historical misconceptions of the Earth's place in the universe.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply the appropriate principles of safety identifying materials, equipment, and safety rules that apply in inquiry and design investigations, identifying proper storage locations for some dangerous chemicals that can be found at home or school, or following established procedures for simple investigations, including following appropriate equipment and clean-up requirements.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind comparing data sets from classroom observations and timed intervals, summarizing knowledge that was gained through careful observations, generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking, or defining and identifying hypotheses, predictions, laws and theories.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply uses of scientific technologies in scientific investigations and innovations comparing tools for measuring, collecting and recording data for accuracy and precision, examining how to care for animals in these investigations, or researching how advances in technologies have altered how scientists measure, collect and record data.
  2. Researching global examples of life, environmental, physical, earth and space scientific and technologic advances exploring historic and current discoveries and innovations, or investigating impact of different scientific discoveries, and/or technologic advances on world population and environmental conditions.
  3. Explore the basic occupational categories for direct connections to science and technology identifying science processes, skills and concepts that apply in the career interest areas (e.g., agriculture and natural resources, business and administrative services, arts and communication, family and human services, industrial and scientific technology and health care), or researching past, present and projected future influences of science and technology in job skills, hobbies and home application.
  4. Associate linkages between conservation and natural resource availabilities to historic and current technological changes identifying causes of pollution in various global and local cases, their effects on plant and animal life, or projecting ways to prevent or reduce pollution.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.C is aligned to standard 11A, stage C (third grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage D

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate contextual inquiry questions brainstorming questions, converting questions into hypothesis statements, researching associated scientific knowledge and skills, or identifying simple independent and dependent variables to be investigated.
  2. Propose procedural steps to investigate inquiry hypothesis applying logical sequence for investigatory process, constructing applicable data tables, selecting necessary materials and equipment, or identifying appropriate safety measures to follow.
  3. Conduct inquiry investigation collecting quantitative and qualitative data from trials, using applicable metric units, observing appropriate and necessary safety precautions, or validating data for accuracy.
  4. Construct charts and visualizations to display data choosing appropriate display media for data analysis, or incorporating available/appropriate technology.
  5. Analyze data trends summarizing inferences, explaining data points including outliers and discrepancies, or synthesizing collected data as evidence for explanations.
  6. Communicate investigation hypothesis, procedure, and explanations, presenting the results of observations and explanations orally and in written format, or generating further questions for investigation to verify or refute hypothesis or explanation.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Identify a contextual technological design dilemma, brainstorming design questions for consideration (e.g., how pendulums work, how heat is transmitted), researching associated knowledge and skills, or identifying independent and dependent variables.
  2. Begin investigations into technological design, identifying design parameters, brainstorming design options and necessary materials, sketching design plans, determining logical sequence for design procedures, generating success criteria indicators, ranges and graphic display options, or identifying appropriate safety measures to follow.
  3. Construct design prototype, selecting necessary materials and equipment, or following procedural steps and necessary safety measures.
  4. Construct charts and visualizations to display data, selecting appropriate graphic display of data, recording appropriate quantitative and qualitative data from multiple trials, or incorporating technology.
  5. Analyze data to evaluate design selection or adaptability, synthesizing collected data, or comparing designs, processes, sources of error and success criteria.
  6. Communicate design solution, procedure, and explanations, preparing graphs and charts to report the results, generating future design modifications, or suggesting alternative applications for design.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the patterns of change in life cycles of plants and animals, comparing the stages within simple life cycles, examining and comparing microscopic and macroscopic life forms and their structures, or making generalizations of observed patterns.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the similarities and differences of generations of offspring, comparing and contrasting specific characteristics of offspring with their parents from immaturity to maturity (e.g., teeth, coloration, metamorphosis variations), linking characteristics (e.g., habit of walking, kind of teeth, use of appendages) among animals to changes over time.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of inheritance in structural and functional features of plants and animals, applying general rules of probability to predict characteristics of offspring from selected parents, or comparing body structures (or functions) from animal fossils that are no longer evident in contemporary animals.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of learned behavior in animals, distinguishing specific characteristics as learned or inherited in various examples, or
  5. conducting simple surveys relating to learned behaviors or attitudes of classmates.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine relationships among organisms in their environment, diagramming a simple relationship between plants and/or animals (i.e., predator/prey, parasite/host, consumer/producer) commonly found in local habitats, describing simple food chains and webs in various habitats, considering habitat changes due to changes in moisture, temperature, or seasons, or contrasting the behavioral patterns and adaptations of organisms from different ecosystems.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the adaptations of physical features of organisms to their environments, identifying the physical features that help plants or animals survive in their environments, or reporting on a specific plant or animal which has adapted to different environments over time.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the properties of various kinds of energy, demonstrating how light travels in a straight line and can be reflected, refracted, or absorbed, experimenting with a variety of ways that heat can be produced, transmitted or absorbed, examining how sound can be detected in animals, exploring how sound is transmitted in different objects, identifying various sources of power in community resources, exploring heat distribution in the classroom or building, or explaining the interrelationships among light, heat, sound, chemical, electrical and mechanical energy.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to associate the properties of common elements, common compounds, and simple mixtures, categorizing heterogeneous and homogeneous samples, analyzing the physical and chemical properties of these samples, or distinguishing the energy requirements to separate physical and chemical combinations.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce constant, variable and periodic motion, describing examples of motions in everyday situations, exploring pendulum variations of length, mass and initial energy inputs, creating student-action models to demonstrate motions in classroom or playground activities, such as walking and running in straight lines and in circular paths.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze forces, collecting and graphing mathematical data on mechanical advantage using simple machines, comparing the relationships of weight and mass on Earth, the moon or other planets, or exploring the effect of friction in common examples.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the Earth's land, water and atmospheric conditions, describing erosion/weathering in terms of impact on features on Earth, diagramming the water cycle to explain changes that occur in the atmosphere during different weather conditions, or predicting atmospheric conditions from cloud, barometric, and other observations.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze the natural weather patterns, describing short- to long-term changes in Earth's climate, suggesting possible causes of climatic changes and effects on biotic communities, or evaluating evidence that human activities have long-term effects on global climate.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to evaluate natural resource supplies, mapping availabilities of these resources, or examining the human causes of diminished supplies of resources.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to study celestial objects in space, comparing planetary objects' composition and distances, introducing the categories of stars and their characteristics, explaining how planets change their position in the sky relative to the stars, or outlining the kinds of space research advances, risks and benefits.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to document the natural cycles and patterns in the solar system, using models of planetary orbits to predict the planets' changing positions, the Moon's changing phases, Earth's changing seasons, the visible constellations' paths, or introducing the relationship of solar system cycles to planning for space flights.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply the appropriate principles of safety, identifying tools and proper steps for use of scientific equipment, using equipment and materials in a safe and proper manner when conducting inquiry design investigations, caring for classroom animal collections properly, identifying ways and places that chemicals can be properly stored, stating general rules to follow in case dangerous chemicals are ingested or inhaled, predicting potential causes of accidents at school, home, and in the community, or following classroom rules for preparation, procedures and clean-up.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind, recognizing the necessity of controlled variables in inquiry and design investigations, identifying faulty procedural steps which could cause different results, recording observations accurately and honestly, generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking, or contrasting hypotheses, predictions, laws, theories and assumptions.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply scientific technologies, incorporating appropriate data collection, storage, retrieval and communication capabilities in classroom investigations, describing how these technologies have enabled scientists to observe phenomenon beyond the capabilities of unaided human senses (radar, microscopy, etc.).
  2. Associate the interactions of technology in science and societal situations, comparing and contrasting its impact, risks and benefits in historical and current physical environmental settings, evaluating available data models of this impact, displaying graphically the influences of these interactions in the lives and careers of people, investigating ways that technology has changed local, national or global environments.
  3. Associate the interactions of societal decisions in science and technology innovations and discoveries, comparing how personal or community choices affect local, regional and global environments in historic, current or projected future settings, explaining the changes in society brought about by the space program, or role-playing public or personal informed decision-making about energy choices, resource availability, conservation, etc.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.D is aligned to standard 11A, stage D (fourth grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage E

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Construct an inquiry hypothesis that can be investigated researching pertinent context, proposing the logical sequence of steps, securing the appropriate materials and equipment, or determining data-collection strategies and format for approved investigation.
  2. Conduct scientific inquiry investigation observing safety precautions and following procedural steps accurately over multiple trials.
  3. Collect qualitative and quantitative data from investigation using available technologies, determining the necessary required precision, or validating data for accuracy.
  4. Organize and display data determining most appropriate visualization strategies for collected data, or using graphs (i.e., double bar, double line, stem and leaf plots) and technologies.
  5. Analyze data to produce reasonable explanations comparing and summarizing data from multiple trials, interpreting trends, evaluating conflicting data, or determining sources of error.
  6. Communicate analysis and conclusions from investigation, interpreting graphs and charts, preparing oral, and/or written conclusions for peer review, or generating additional questions that can be tested.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Identify an innovative technological design from ordinary surroundings or circumstances brainstorming common design questions (e.g., how to squeeze toothpaste better, how to fly a better paper airplane), researching background information, or suggesting the appropriate materials, equipment, data-collection strategies and success factors for approved investigation.
  2. Construct selected technological innovation sketching design, proposing the logical sequence of steps for construction, collecting appropriate materials, supplies, and safety equipment, or completing assembly of innovation.
  3. Test prototype conducting multiple trials, collecting reliable and precise data, or recording observations.
  4. Analyze data comparing and summarizing data, interpreting trends, evaluating conflicting data, or determining sources of error.
  5. Communicate design findings selecting graphs and charts that effectively report the data, preparing oral and written investigation conclusions, or generating alternative design modifications which can be tested from original investigated question.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the patterns of change and stability at the micro- and macroscopic levels of organisms (including humans), comparing the stages of simple life cycles and energy requirements, or identifying structures and their functions in cells, tissues, organs, systems and organisms (including humans).
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to distinguish the similarities and differences of offspring in organisms (including humans), comparing specific characteristics of offspring with their parents, or predicting possible genetic combinations from selected parental characteristics.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of inheritance in structural and functional features of organisms (including humans), describing genetic and environmental influences on the features of organisms, distinguishing between inherited and acquired characteristics, or explaining how cells respond to genetic and environmental influences.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the nature of learned behavior or responses in all organisms (including humans), distinguishing characteristics as learned or inherited, or conducting simple surveys relating to learned behaviors of classmates, and/or family members.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to categorize organisms (including humans) by their energy relationships in their environments, classifying organisms by their position in a food web, grouping organisms according to their adaptive internal and/or external features, contrasting food webs within and among different biomes, identifying the biotic and abiotic factors associated with specific habitats, or making simple inferences to the closed systems of other planets.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain competitive, adaptive and survival potential of species in different local or global ecosystems, identifying survival characteristics of organisms, explaining abiotic or biotic factors which threaten health or survival of populations or species (including humans), or identifying theories explaining mass extinctions.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore energy, demonstrating how mirrors, prisms, diffraction gratings and filters direct light patterns, diagramming how electricity can be produced from different sources of energy, explaining how electrical energy can be converted to light, heat, sound, and magnetic energy, analyzing common examples of potential and kinetic energy, or comparing insulation, conduction, convection, and radiation of heat.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to distinguish the properties of matter, separating components of mixtures by solubility, magnetic properties and densities, analyzing compound samples by quantitative methods, graphing the temperature variations associated with phase changes of simple substances, or categorizing the properties of common elements into a graphic format.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore constant, variable and periodic motion, tracing and measuring motion of vehicles (e.g., cars, bicycles, skates) in terms of position, direction, acceleration and speed in straight line, circular and inclined paths, introducing the concepts of harmonic and oscillating motion in everyday examples, or applying the concepts of natural frequency.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze actions and reactions, examining initial and final forces, manipulating simple direct and inverse proportions to forces, explaining thrust, weight, lift and drag in flight, analyzing gears and gear ratios to do work, or demonstrating Newton's Laws of Motion in terms of space flight.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze global topographic features modeling the effect of glaciation on a surface with applications to Illinois topography, or using satellite pictures, various topographic and thematic maps to indicate demographic, economic and weather patterns, and/or their interrelationships to each other.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze weather and climatic conditions, comparing historic and current precipitation, barometric, and temperature records, and trends, projecting future trends based on past and current records, or making inferences about cloud formations and weather conditions.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine long-term global, national and local renewable and nonrenewable resource supplies, explaining how historic economic choices have affected resource supplies, or focusing on comparative historic and projected water supplies and demands such as those for the local community, Illinois, the nation, and/or the world.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce concepts that explain planetary, interplanetary and stellar characteristics and cycles, generalizing the composition and features of the inner and outer planets, asteroids, comets, and different star types, applying orbital concepts for seasonal positions of constellations, applying apparent motions in the sky to use the sky as a clock, compass or calendar, explaining how the planets change their position in the sky relative to the stars over time using varying astronomic images.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce the concepts of gravitation in the solar system and beyond, identifying the general applications of gravitational forces on Earth and in near and far space examples, explaining continuous free fall in space flight, or applying solar system cycles to trajectories in space flight and research.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety wearing appropriate safety gear during inquiry or design investigations, demonstrating how to use a fire extinguisher, identifying safety procedures for preparation, process and conclusion of science investigations to minimize safety hazards, or recognizing potential poisonous plants or substances in classroom, outdoor or home settings, or role-playing safe reactions to safety crisis situations.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind explaining why similar investigations should but may not produce similar results, identifying circumstances which distort how variables interact, labeling accurate observations fully and carefully, or generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply scientific technologies collecting, storing, retrieving, and communicating data in classroom research and investigations, or researching the progression of technological advances in pure and applied scientific investigations and innovations.
  2. Investigate the interactions of technology in science and societal situations displaying graphically the improvements and their impact in local and global agriculture, transportation, health, sanitation, engineering, and manufacturing settings over time, or explaining different perceptions about discoveries, innovations, and trends in places, events, and regions.
  3. Investigate the interactions of societal decisions in science and technology innovations and discoveries exploring the family, local, national, or global impact of them, examining conceptual, mathematical and policy implications of energy conservation programs for classrooms, schools, homes and communities, or describing the changes in tools, careers, resource use and productivity over the centuries.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.E is aligned to standard 11A, stage E (fifth grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage F

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate hypotheses generating if-then, cause-effect statements and predictions, or choosing and explaining selection of the controlled variables.
  2. Design and conduct scientific investigation, incorporating appropriate safety precautions, available technology and equipment, researching historic and current foundations for similar studies, or replicating all processes in multiple trials.
  3. Collect and organize data accurately, using consistent measuring and recording techniques with necessary precision, using appropriate metric units, documenting data accurately from collecting instruments, or graphing data appropriately.
  4. Interpret and represent results of analysis to produce findings, differentiating observations that support or refute a hypothesis, identifying the unexpected data within the data set, or proposing explanations for discrepancies in the data set.
  5. Report the process and results of an investigation, using available technologies for presentations, distinguishing observations that support the original hypothesis, analyzing a logical proof or explanation of findings, or generating additional questions which address procedures, similarities, discrepancies or conclusions for further investigations.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Formulate proposals for technological designs which model or test scientific principles, generating investigation ideas to apply curricular science principles (e.g., how to test phase changes of substances or acceleration in free fall, or effect of ice/glaciers on rocks), brainstorming pertinent variables, researching historic designs, or conducting peer review and choice for design and criteria selection.
  2. Plan and construct technological design, incorporating the safety and procedural guidelines into the construction plan, or maximizing resource capabilities.
  3. Collect and record data accurately using consistent metric measuring and recording techniques with necessary precision, or documenting data from collecting instruments accurately in selected format.
  4. Interpret and represent results of analysis to produce findings, comparing data sets for supporting or refuting scientific principle, evaluating multiple criteria for overall design success, or proposing explanations for sources of error in the data set for process or product design flaws.
  5. Communicate the results of design investigation presenting an oral and/or written report, explaining the test of the scientific principle, using available technologies, relating anecdotal and quantitative observations, or generating additional design modifications which can be tested later.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the cellular unit recognizing how cells function independently to keep the organism alive at the single cell level and dependently at specialized levels, or comparing the metabolic and reproductive processes, structures and functions of single and multi-cellular organisms, to examine the patterns of change and stability over time, investigating the development of organisms and their environmental adaptations over broad time periods, or comparing the physical characteristics of two to three generations of familial characteristics.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the basic roles of genes and chromosomes in transmitting traits over generations, describing how physical traits are transmitted through sexual or asexual reproductive processes, charting 'pedigree' probabilities for transmissions, identifying examples of selective breeding for particular traits, or analyzing how familiar human diseases are related to genetic mutations.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine stimulus-response reactions in organisms, comparing growth responses in plants, comparing simple locomotive or metabolic responses in simple or complex life forms.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to study the impact of multiple factors that affect organisms in a habitat, describing how behaviors are influenced by internal and external factors, sketching the interrelationships among/between the land, water and air components to life in the system, predicting the consequences of the disruption of a food pyramid, identifying the interrelationships and variables that affect population sizes and behaviors, or identifying different niches and relationships found among organisms in an Illinois habitat.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to apply the competitive, adaptive and survival potential of organisms, describing how fossils are used to determine patterns of evolution, observing how plant and animal characteristics help organisms survive in their environments, or analyzing how environmental factors threaten or enhance the survival potential of populations.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to demonstrate the interactions of energy forms explaining how interactions of matter and energy affect the changes of state, tracing electrical current in simple direct and alternating circuits, or diagramming how sound, heat and light energy forms are detected by humans and other organisms.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the basic structure of matter illustrating the structure of elements and simple compounds, measuring the masses of chemical reactants and products to show that the sum equals the parts, investigating the compressibility and expansion of gases at colder and hotter temperatures, or analyzing the electrical nature of charges, attraction, and repulsion.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine gravitational forces, correlating how an object's mass and distances affect weight in Earth and planetary examples, identifying the effects of the Sun's gravitational force in the solar system, or predicting direct and inverse proportional trends from data of gravitational attraction.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to incorporate the impact of force on motion, associating Newton's three laws of motion to mass, distance, and acceleration, making metric mathematical calculations of average speed, velocity, and acceleration, or comparing resistance and friction factors in electrical, magnetic, fluid, and physical systems.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the large-scale dynamic forces, events and processes that affect Earth's land and populations, demonstrating tectonic movements related to earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes, or researching past, current and projected Earth system phenomena that affect populations.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the large-scale dynamic forces, events and processes that affect Earth's water/atmospheric systems and populations, researching hurricane paths, global temperature trends, ocean temperatures and their effects on populations, researching past, current and projected Earth system phenomena that affect populations, or exploring the concepts associated with the 'greenhouse effect' on Earth.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to relate various pollution and resource relationships, examining community and national policies for regulating recycling, pollution, and production of resources, or evaluating biodegradability of natural and synthetic materials according to composition and risk/benefits.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze the solar system and planetary characteristics, comparing gravitational, atmospheric, compositional, and energy factors necessary for planetary habitation, describing evidence for presence of water beyond Earth, or predicting factors and materials necessary for interplanetary travel and study.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the features of the universe introducing the calculations associated with the scale of the universe in terms of the speed of light, describing the star groupings according to masses, color, apparent color, distances and brightness, identifying these characteristics about our star and its layers, or comparing the capabilities of different kinds of telescopes and imaging technologies.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety, outlining safety precautions, clean-up and disposal procedures, as well as specimen care and handling for inquiry or design investigations, role-playing responses for individual or group reactions in threatening weather, hazardous chemical contamination, or other unsafe situations, or conducting safety tests or surveys about potential safety hazards in the classroom, school building, or home.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind, generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking, researching historic examples of valid and faulty hypothesis generation and investigations, contrasting the scientific methods of observational and experimental investigations, or proposing how and why more than one possible conclusion should be considered and can be drawn from scientific investigations.
  3. Analyze cases of scientific studies, studying historic examples of valid inquiry investigations associated with the life, environmental, physical, earth and space sciences, contrasting faulty studies with deviations from established scientific methods, contrasting the scientific methods between observational, remote and experimental investigations, or suggesting how societal influences have affected scientific inquiry positively and negatively.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Apply scientific technologies, incorporating technology and probe ware into classroom research, investigations, and contextual studies, or projecting possible technological advances in the near and long-term future.
  2. Research the interactions of technology in science and societal situations, explaining ways that ecosystems have been changed as results of technological innovations, inferring technological impact in published medical, economic, and population statistics (e.g., birth/death rates, disease transmission), or explaining how changes in transportation, communication, production, and other technologies affect the location of economic activities.
  3. Analyze the societal interactions resulting from scientific discoveries and technological innovations, researching the scientific milestones that have revolutionized thinking over time, grouping technological innovations to historic time periods and changes in communities and countries, or comparing public perceptions about the costs and impact of pure science research and applied science solutions.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.F is aligned to standard 11A, stage F (sixth grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage G

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate contextual hypotheses generating an if-then, cause- effect premise, differentiating qualitative and quantitative data and their applicability, using conceptual/mathematical/physical models, or previewing existing research as primary reading sources.
  2. Design inquiry investigation which addresses proposed hypothesis, determining choice of variables, preparing data-collecting format, or incorporating all procedural and safety precautions, materials and equipment handling directions.
  3. Conduct inquiry investigation choosing applicable metric units of measurement with estimated scale and range of results for student-generated data tables, using direct, indirect, or remote technologies for observing and measuring, conducting sufficient multiple trials, or recording all necessary data and observations objectively.
  4. Interpret and represent analysis of results to produce findings, observing trends within data sets, evaluating data sets to explore explanations of outliers or sources of error, or analyzing observations and data which may support or refute inquiry hypothesis.
  5. Report and display the process and findings of inquiry investigation, presenting oral or written final report for peer review, generating further questions for alternative investigations or procedural refinements, or evaluating other investigations for consolidation/refinement of procedures or data explanation.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Identify an important historic innovation or model of a technological design, examining inventions or entrepreneurial events driven by science or engineering principles, searching pertinent historical foundation, or determining the success criteria, design constraints, and testing logistics that were encountered.
  2. Construct selected technological innovation model, sketching a progression of design stages and prototypes, proposing the logical sequence of steps in design construction, identifying original and comparable simulation materials for construction, predicting proportional scale for actual parameters and materials, or completing assembly of innovation model.
  3. Test prototype predicting proportional scale for actual parameters and materials, conducting multiple trials according to success criteria, scale, and design constraints, or recording reliable and precise data and anecdotal observations.
  4. Analyze data to evaluate design, comparing and summarizing data from multiple model trials, or correlating historic conditions and data to model testing.
  5. Communicate design evaluation report, presenting oral and written report on historical significance of selected technological design and tested model, its original constraints and conditions, or generating possible alternative designs which could have been considered historically.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the cellular-to-organism interrelationships, comparing the increasingly complex structure and function of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems, demonstrating the processes for biological classification, analyzing normal and abnormal growth and health in organisms (with a focus on humans), describing how physiological systems carry out vital functions (e.g., respiration, digestion, reproduction, photosynthesis, excretion, and temperature regulation).
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine macro- and micro-evolution in organisms, comparing and assessing changes in the features or forms of organisms over broad time periods to their adaptive functions and competitive advantages, describing how natural selection accounts for diversity of species over many generations.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the science of genetics, tracing the history of genetics, correlating the principles of genetics to mitotic cell division and simple mathematical probabilities, researching applied genetics in plant and animal breeding, or associating genetic factors for inheritance in humans, including genetic disorders.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the cellular coordination of responses, describing how the nervous system communicates between cells within the whole organism, tracing stimulus-response paths in various nervous systems, or analyzing the effect of substances (e.g., oxygen, food, blood, hormones, drugs) circulating through the body.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to examine the energy requirements of ecosystems, tracing the roles and population ratios of producers, consumers, and decomposers in food chains and webs, or identifying the biomass relationship with the transfer of energy from the sun to final consumers.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to relate the chemical cycles in ecosystems, modeling the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles with local references, or researching groundwater resources and potential sources of contamination with local examples.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the interactions between an ecosystem's organisms, examining types of interactive relationships (e.g., mutualism, predation, parasitism) with specific examples, or explaining interrelationship of adaptations and ecosystem survival.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to introduce population dynamics in ecosystems, exploring models of population growth rates, determining factors that limit population growth, or researching specific instances of population explosions over time.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to model global biomes, identifying the general climate, soil, and inhabitant of the six major land-based biomes, mapping the global biomes, or comparing the graphical meteorological data (temperature, precipitation) of biomes/ecosystems.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare heat, light, and sound energies, distinguishing heat and temperature, their measurements, and the relationship to mass, recording temperatures of simple substances collected during melting/freezing or boiling/condensing to trace phase changes, identifying ways of production and travel for heat, light, and sound in various media, or relating sound reflection, loudness, frequency, and pitch in common examples.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the nature of energy conversions and conservation, describing energy and its different forms with common examples, categorizing energy into kinetic and potential states, explaining energy conversion and conservation possibilities, or introducing the connections to concepts of force, momentum, power, and motion.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the basic structure of matter measuring mass and volumes of common solids (regular and irregular) and liquids to introduce density ratios, comparing ratios of different masses and different volumes of the same kinds of samples, relating how historic models of elemental matter from ancient Greeks to medieval alchemists evolved to current representations and explanations, classifying comparable properties of representative elements or similar compounds (mixtures, acids, bases, salts, metals, non-metals), or constructing simple chemical structure models to explain chemical combinations, states, and properties.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore frames of reference for measuring motion, visualizing the possible reference frames in multiple motion examples, or comparing scope of motion (straight line, projectile, inclined, free fall, circular) of various objects.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to measure motion, explaining the dimensions of speed/time with directional units, comparing speed, average speed, velocity, acceleration, and momentum with common examples, using simple machines to demonstrate the principles of mechanics, or analyzing components of motion graphically.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to measure force, explaining the dimensions of force graphically, comparing common examples of balanced or unbalanced forces in everyday use, or examining frictional forces in common examples.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore laws and theories associated with motion, comparing common situations to each of Newton's three laws of motion, using the appropriate units, introducing applications to Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, or incorporating the variant of air resistance.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries and technological design to investigate large-scale dynamic forces that change geologic features, diagramming single global features over time as affected by continental drift, identifying properties and origins of rocks and minerals, or explaining impact of weathering, erosion, and deposition.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate large-scale meteorological forces distinguishing weather from climate, examining global weather data over broad periods of time, or explaining how atmospheric circulation is driven by solar heating.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate large-scale oceanographic forces, mapping ocean motions and life zones, identifying the quantitative proportions of ocean and fresh water.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the earth in space with its moon, plotting how the relative motions and positions of the sun, earth, and moon influence eclipses, moon phases, and tides, comparing the composition and surface features of the earth and moon, using imaging, magnifications and displays to model the moon's surface features, or calculating earth and moon rise and set over time.
  2. Apply scientific designs to explore the solar system, comparing the major features of the solar system including the nine planets, their moons, orbital shapes, surface and atmospheric conditions, orientation and periods of rotation and revolution, charting orbital factors of comets, asteroids, meteors, etc., or explaining imaging displays of different kinds of solar system objects.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to study the galaxies, describing the relationship of galactic components (e.g., age, composition, properties), or explaining imaging displays of views of galactic objects.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to study space exploration, creating a timeline which denotes the important events associated with the global space programs, identifying the kinds of technologies which are currently used for studying the solar system and universe, or reporting on applicable historic studies which have provided discoveries, tools or explanations associated with space exploration.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety, identifying potentially hazardous chemical combinations in the home or classroom, suggesting responses and reactions in home and classroom settings in case of threatening chemical scenarios, following all necessary safety precautions, cleaning and disposal procedures for scientific investigations, demonstrating safe transport, precise use, and appropriate storage for scientific equipment, or providing safe and ethical care for all classroom organism collections.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind, generating questions and strategies to test science concepts using critical and creative thinking, identifying instances of how scientific reasoning, insight, skill, creativity, intellectual honesty, tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, persistence, and openness to new ideas have been integral to scientific discoveries and technological improvements, or comparing scientist's work and habits of mind to work in other careers.
  3. Analyze cases of scientific studies, studying historic examples of valid investigations from curricular life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, finding examples of faulty or biased scientific reasoning which distorted scientific understanding, or citing experimental and observational strategies in direct, indirect, and remote investigations.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Explore scientific technologies in life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, identifying advances in the past century, describing technologies used by scientists to forecast, explain, or test major events in each of the sciences, or diagramming processes and products from applicable technologies.
  2. Explore the interactions of science and technology in multicultural, societal, and economic settings, analyzing how the introduction of a new technology has affected human activities worldwide, or associating personal biographic information about science leaders from around the world.
  3. Explore historic, multicultural societal influences on scientific discoveries and technological innovations, comparing the knowledge, skills, and methods of early and modern scientists in the sciences, or finding examples of rejection of scientific or technological advances by cultures based on belief systems.
  4. Explore scientific concepts in career and technical knowledge and skills in everyday settings, interviewing adults to identify specific applications of scientific concepts or technological innovations, researching job market trends for anticipated changes in the next ten-year period based on projected technology interventions, resource depletion or access, or economic interactions, or demonstrating relationships between improving technology, all science fields, and educational/training requirements for such careers.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.G is aligned to standard 11A, stage G (seventh grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.G - Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11B.G - Historic Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.G - Gene ScenePDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to examine macro- and micro-evolution in organisms.
  • 12B.G - Survival AdaptionsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to explain interrelationships of adaptations and ecosystem survival.
  • 12.C.G - Making New ElectricityPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design from historic perspectives to explore the nature of energy conversions and conservation.
  • 12D.G - Leonardo LivesPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of historic technological design to measure force and/or motion using simple machines and the principles of mechanics.
  • 12E.G - Weather ProverbsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to investigate large-scale meteorological forces.
  • 12F.G - Journal of the StarsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to explore the galaxy.
  • 13A.G - Habits are Hard to BreakPDF Document
    Students will compare scientific habits of mind in scientific and non-scientific everyday settings.
  • 13B.G - Interactions of Science and TechnologyPDF Document
    Students will explore the interactions of science and technology in multicultural, societal and economic settings from an historical context in multiple curricular units.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage H

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate issue-specific hypothesis, generating inquiry questions for an issue investigational premise, differentiating qualitative and quantitative data and their applicability, using conceptual/mathematical/physical models, or previewing associated research.
  2. Design scientific issue investigation which addresses proposed hypothesis(es), proposing applicable survey instruments, or selecting associated research, analysis, and communication components.
  3. Conduct issue investigation, using technologies for data collection and assimilation, following established formats for random sampling, or following all procedural and safety precautions, materials and equipment handling directions.
  4. Interpret and represent analysis of results evaluating data sets to explore explanations of unexpected responses and data concurrence, evaluating survey validity and reliability, or analyzing research and data for supporting or refuting the hypothesis.
  5. Report, display and defend the process and findings of issue investigation, presenting oral or written final report for action response options for peer review, generating further questions or issues for consideration, or evaluating other resolutions or responses for action for applicable correlations, consolidation or explanations.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Formulate proposals for design investigation, generating strategies to test or model a scientific concept, suggesting appropriate supplies, materials, resources, and equipment to test concepts.
  2. Create and conduct technological design testing objectively, sketching schematic of design or predictions, or incorporating the appropriate safety, available technology and equipment capabilities into construction and testing of design.
  3. Collect and record data accurately, using consistent metric measuring and recording techniques with necessary precision, recording data accurately in appropriate format, or graphing data appropriately according to the tested variables.
  4. Represent results of analysis to produce findings comparing data sets according to the design criteria, evaluating multiple prototype solutions to the overall design success criteria, or proposing explanations for sources of error in the data set with regards to product design flaws, or model limitations.
  5. Report the process and results of a design investigation, selecting graphs and charts that effectively report the design data, making oral and/or written presentations, proposing logical explanations of success or errors, or generating additional design modifications which can be tested later.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the chemical nature of biological processes, describing photosynthesis in terms of basic requirements and products, correlating respiration, or diagramming the nitrogen, water, oxygen, and carbon cycles with reference to ecosystem-to-molecular levels.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to correlate the basis of cellular and organism reproductive processes, correlating possible genetic combinations to the type of reproductive process, diagramming and comparing mitotic and meiotic cell division, or distinguishing asexual and sexual (egg, sperm and zygote formation) reproduction with examples.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare evolutionary trends between kingdoms and phyla, exploring natural and applied hybridization, explaining the increasing sophistication of body systems correlating embryological, structural, and functional development, or exploring the impact of environmental factors on these trends.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore social and environmental responses of organisms, describing learned and inherited behaviors and responses across kingdoms and between/among phyla, explaining cyclic behaviors and responses in various species, or examining social behaviors of insects and vertebrates.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to explore the implications of change and stability in ecosystems, identifying evolutionary adaptations brought on by environmental changes, analyzing factors that influence the size and stability of populations (e.g., temperature, climate, soil conditions, predation, habitat), or contrasting energy use by organisms.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to examine species' demise or success within ecosystems identifying problems for species conservation and extinction, projecting population changes when habitats are altered or destroyed (deforestation, desertification, wetlands destruction, introduction of exotic species),or researching economic and scientific value implications for changes to genetic diversity.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to study biogeography, researching global biomes, locating hemispheric, continental, and regional examples of each biome, or graphing associated mathematical comparison factors.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to analyze Illinois-specific ecosystems and biomes, modeling topographic features, population data, plant diversity and distribution from historic records, collecting scientific seasonal/annual local ecosystem data for direct connection to change and stability factors, or projecting scenarios of changes to local ecosystem for near- and long-term future contingencies.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine patterns of interactions of energy with matter, describing and measuring how the interactions effect changes of state or properties, using quantitative data from investigations and simple chemical formulas and equations to support the concept of conservation of mass, comparing positions, movements, and relationships of atoms in different states, or predicting chemical reactivity from information in the Periodic Table.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore electric and magnetic energy fields, describing natural forces of static electricity and kinds of conductors and insulators, sketching the magnetic lines of force and basic polar attraction and repulsion, or creating electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields with simple explanations.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the chemical and physical characteristics of matter, constructing and discussing models and charts that explain these properties, investigating the relationships among atoms, molecules, elements, and compounds, classifying objects and mixtures based on these properties, explaining the organization of elements in the Periodic Table, or investigating the properties of gases at varying temperatures and pressures.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the conservation of matter and energy, quantifying conservation of mass, diagramming conservation of energy in common examples, or relating the concepts of force, momentum, power, motion, and work to the concepts of mass, distance, and velocity and their applicable constants, laws, and equations.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine multiple dimensions of motion, tracing and measuring motion in terms of position, direction, acceleration, and speed in straight line, circular, and inclined paths, testing the harmonic and oscillating motion in everyday examples, or applying natural frequency to common examples and scientific studies.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate gravitational forces: explaining the comparisons of weight and mass with variations of 'g' forces and different locations, or calculating descent and free fall trajectories of objects in various settings.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the applications of scientific work, constructing variations of simple and compound machines to measure work, power, and force with varying frictional factors, calculating work efficiency of common and complex machines, or converting forces of nature (such as weather: tornadoes, wind) into Newtonian factors.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries and technological designs to investigate the explanations of the geologic features and structures, diagramming the established geologic eras, periods, and epochs, describing the geological events that led to the formation of the Great Lakes and Illinois, or relating physical and chemical properties of minerals.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine meteorological phenomena, describing large-scale and local weather systems, interpreting weather maps, describing the composition, properties, range of temperatures, and/or pressures in various layers of the atmosphere, describing relationships between the sun and the earth's climate, seasons and weather.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine Earth's resources quantitatively, demonstrating biodegradation of various substances, explaining specific examples of mining, or comparing renewability or availability of earth resources, including freshwater reserves.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to compare the view of Earth as a planet, studying prehistoric and historic views of the universe, or explaining the absorption, reflection and transfer of the Sun's energy over land, water surfaces and features.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the view from Earth to the solar system, relating gravitational force between planetary bodies in the solar system, introducing theories of origin of the solar system components, or explaining photographic or historic records and mathematical calculations of comets and their orbits.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the view from Earth to the galaxies, calculating exponential scale of distances within and beyond the Milky Way galaxy, explaining the possible distortions of these views from Earth's surface, or classifying galaxies, etc. by size, composition, distances, established shapes, etc.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare the history of astronomy through the ages, modeling major constellations, explaining the roles that constellations played in the multi-cultural development of navigation and agriculture, explaining theories, past and present, for the origin and evolution of the universe, or comparing astrological beliefs to astronomical laws and theories.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety within and beyond the science classroom, communicating and following clear instructions, mapping classrooms for safe egress and distances/times to access safety treatment features, demonstrating safety practices and emergency procedures pertaining to laboratory and field work, or explaining the basis of safety practices and procedures.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind to curricular investigations in life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, evaluating evidence, inferring statements based on data, questioning sources of information, explaining necessity of manipulating only one variable at a time, or retrieving mathematical data accurately for scientific analysis.
  3. Analyze scientific studies referenced in curricular investigations in life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, reviewing experimental procedures or explanations for possible faulty reasoning or unproven statements (e.g., power line magnetic fields, abiogenesis models), distinguishing relationships of scientific theories, models, hypotheses, experiments, and methodologies, or distinguishing fact from opinion and science from pseudoscience.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Explore interaction of resource acquisition, technological development, and ecosystem impact, documenting actual local, regional, national, or global examples, proposing alternative solutions to interaction impact, or estimating costs of such interactions.
  2. Explore natural resource conservation and management programs, calculating home/school electric or water usage, etc., to propose plans for increased efficiency, evaluating their effect on natural resources and the local economy, researching the past, current, and future local landfill plans, or examining state wildlife programs for controlled breeding or population maintenance.
  3. Explore policies which affect local science or technology issues, researching applicable issue of local concern (e.g., subdivision development, groundwater contamination), developing classroom criteria to measure effectiveness of policies, developing survey instruments to assess depths of informed opinions on issues, collecting pertinent data from expert local sources, or analyzing data and policy correlation.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.H is aligned to standard 11A, stage H (eighth grade). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.H - Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11B.H - Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.H - Marketing the New HybridsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to compare evolutionary trends between kingdoms and phyla.
  • 12B.H - Illinois' Habitats HappeningPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of issue investigations to analyze Illinois-specific ecosystems and biomes and their local issues of resource acquisition, conservation, management and/or technological development.
  • 12C.H - No Creation-No DestructionPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry and technological design to support the concept of conservation of mass.
  • 12D.H - Gravitational FactorsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to investigate mathematical models of gravitational force.
  • 12E.H - Investigating the CompostPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry or technological design to examine earth’s resources quantitatively.
  • 12F.H - Where are the Stars? PDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to compare the view from the Earth to the galaxies.
  • 13A.H - Threats to ValidityPDF Document
    Students will apply scientific habits of mind to investigations in the sciences.
  • 13B.H - Our Landfill FuturePDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to explore natural resource conservation and management programs.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage I

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate independent content-specific hypothesis referencing pertinent reliable prior research, or proposing options for appropriate questions, procedural steps, and necessary resources.
  2. Design an inquiry investigation which addresses proposed hypothesis, determining variables and control groups, incorporating all procedural and safety precautions, materials and equipment handling directions and data-collection formatting preparations, or securing approval for all procedures, equipment use and safety concerns.
  3. Conduct inquiry investigation, using technologies for observing and measuring directly, indirectly, or remotely, completing multiple, statistically-valid trials, or accurately and precisely recording all data.
  4. Interpret and represent analysis of results to produce findings that support or refute inquiry hypothesis, evaluating data sets to explore explanations of outliers or sources of error and trends, or applying statistical methods to compare mode, mean, percent error and frequency functions.
  5. Present and defend process and findings in open forum, generating further questions, explaining impact of possible sources of error, or reflecting on and evaluating peer critiques and comparable inquiry investigations for consolidation or refinement of procedures.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Identify an historic engineering feat, innovation or model, researching historic dilemmas which necessitated new scientific or engineering solutions, brainstorming the kinds of barriers or circumstances that existed, identifying the simulation materials and procedural sequence which can simulate historic conditions, or determining success criteria, design constraints, and testing logistics encountered.
  2. Construct innovation model, sketching progressive schematics of the design, collecting appropriate materials, supplies, and safety equipment, or completing assembly of innovation or model.
  3. Test prototype conducting multiple trials according to success criteria, scale, and design constraints, or collecting reliable and precise data.
  4. Analyze data to evaluate designs, comparing and summarizing data from multiple trials, evaluating conflicting data for validity and precision, correlating historic conditions and observations to model testing, or determining sources of error.
  5. Communicate design evaluation report, selecting graphs and charts that most effectively report the design data, preparing oral and written investigation conclusions for peer review, relating historic setting and impact to scientific or engineering solution and eventual progression of designs, or generating alternative design modifications which can be or could have been tested.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain metabolic processes within cells and between organisms and their environment, explaining gas exchange, food processing, transport, excretion, locomotion, body regulation, and nervous control, investigating enzyme actions in various reactions, or describing the applications of the polar nature of water and the pH index in biochemical reactions.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze the cellular organelles and functions, using different microscopic techniques, explaining functional processes chemically and structurally (e.g., osmotic, active and facilitated transport, enzyme action and protein/lipid/carbohydrate metabolism).
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the molecular nature of the genetic code, explaining the function, chemical reactions, and schematic diagrams of the molecular components of DNA, RNA and simple proteins, exploring the processes of recombinant DNA research, describing the role of chromosomes in the normal and aberrant display of hereditary traits, mutations and disease.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to compare taxonomic criteria among organisms, examining unicellular, colonial, and multi-cellular organisms for common and differing characteristics.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain tests of evolutionary evidence, analyzing acceptance of geologic and fossil records, researching comparative anatomy, embryology, biochemistry and cytology studies of analogous and homologous structures.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to explain population growth, density factors in ecosystem change and stability and biodiversity: researching population model studies to determine limiting factors and mathematical patterns of population growth in real-world situations, investigating biotic and abiotic factors of ecosystems, or identifying the roles and relationships of organisms in their community in terms of impact on populations and the ecosystem.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain the environment- energy interactions comparing the biomass involved in energy transfer by organisms at different tropic levels, relating biome productivity to carbon-fixing and energy storage by producers, correlating major chemical cycles (nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water) to other chemical cycles in nature (e.g., phosphorus, sulfur, strontium), or relating the laws of thermodynamics to environmental-energy transfer efficiency.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to research global biomes, identifying the latitude, altitude, soil, temperature and precipitation ranges, and inhabitants of the six major land-based biomes, comparing the salinity, light penetration, nutrients, and inhabitants of aquatic biomes, identifying feeding relationships within biomes, or comparing climatographs of biomes or carbon-fixing/storage productivity estimations.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate the energies of the electromagnetic spectrum, describing the nature/ characteristics/types/speed/ interactions of waves, contrasting the spectral bands of energy, their detection and applications, or modeling rays, reflection, refraction, diffraction and polarization of waves.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate heat and sound energy mechanics, contrasting the production and conversions of heat and sound from the atomic to industrial levels, diagramming and modeling the processes or systems associated with large- and small-scale production, transmission and uses of heat and sound (e.g., heat engines, cooling systems, musical instruments).
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate the atomic and nuclear structure of matter, examining historical atomic theories and quantum theory, modeling nuclear and electron configurations and their reactions, or predicting bonding and molecular structure.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain how physical and chemical structures of matter affect its properties, relating bonding types and shapes of molecules to organic and inorganic compounds, or examining the colligative properties of solutes on the properties of solutions/mixtures.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate kinetic theory and laws of thermodynamics, describing the ideal gases, analyzing the gas laws, or explaining entropy/ enthalpy, exothermic/endothermic reactions, and/or Hess's law.

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate motion relationships in natural and forced settings, calculating the kinematics of rectilinear, free fall, projectile, rotational, and circular motion in commonly experienced problem settings, explaining torque and center of mass in relation to the conditions of equilibrium, explaining the Doppler effect, or calculating forces in elastic and inelastic collisions.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate motion and pressure common examples in nature, defining the factors of pressure and its equilibrium, identifying how particles in a fluid can exert pressure as related to altitude and depth, explaining buoyancy and hydraulics in terms of comparative densities, addressing Bernoulli's principles to flight, or relating pressure and gravity to common engineering settings.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore atomic and nuclear physical systems, describing historic, current, and proposed research to explain purposes and impact of discoveries, or explaining radioactivity in terms of atomic decay, nuclear reactions, and emissions.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain harmonic motion, describing the scope of vibrational motion, calculating harmonic periods variations, constructing variations to linear and angular simple harmonic motion and elastic constants, or exploring historic studies which established applicable constants, laws and theories.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate electricity and magnetism, comparing, flow, units, and charges in magnetic and electric fields and circuits, measuring electromagnetic conversions and induction, examining applicable historic discoveries, explanations and laws, explaining static electricity, or explaining the schematic designs and flow models for electromagnetic devices.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries and technological designs to examine Earth's atmosphere and its changes, observing local weather factors over time, comparing current and past climate, or analyzing weather conditions in terms of Earth's inclination and solar fluctuations.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine Earth's hydrosphere and its changes, documenting impact of large-scale weather systems from short- and long-term weather reports, or predicting climatic conditions for geographic settings.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine Earth's lithosphere and its changes, using earth rock cycle remnants, soil formation, and tectonic movements, and fossil records, constructing models of tectonic plates and their impact on large-scale structures, or constructing local topographic maps.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine earth's interior and its changes, explaining the distribution and causes of natural events such as earthquakes and volcanoes, or explaining the indirect methods to determine the Earth's inner structure and its effects on the surface features.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the changing perspective of the Earth in space, documenting the changes in public perception of the Earth since the space program began, or researching the technologies which have broadened the information known about the earth and its resources.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine Earth's place in the solar system, calculating distances between planetary bodies, orbital paths, trajectories and collision potential with asteroids, etc., explaining lunar and solar eclipses, or graphing meteor impact craters to geologic time periods and mass extinctions.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the Sun's place in the solar system, explaining the energy of the sun in relation to the full electromagnetic spectrum, correlating sunspot activity and cycles to earth events and phenomena, or describing the solar atmosphere, inner layers, nuclear reactions, and temperatures.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the solar system's place in the universe, analyzing the life cycles of stars of different masses, explaining the flow of energy within stars to the formation of the chemical elements, or relating nebulae, dust clouds, stars, pulsars, black holes, etc.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine the similarities found throughout the universe, comparing bright line spectra of different elements in different stars, using proportional relationships of reference stars to estimate magnitude of unknown stars, or demonstrating models of the expanding universe concepts.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety, following established procedures to maintain both personal & environmental safety when handling & disposing of chemicals, estimating risks/benefits to alternative procedures, mapping classroom laboratory facilities for safe egress & distances/times to access safety treatment features, manipulating, reading and troubleshooting scientific equipment safely, communicating school science storage and disposal policies for classroom investigations, demonstrating safety practices and emergency procedures pertaining to laboratory and field work, researching community disposal procedures (e.g., mercury thermometers or lead batteries), or participating in household waste and hazardous waste pickup programs in Illinois.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind to curricular investigations in life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, identifying instances of how scientific reasoning, insight, creativity, skill, intellectual honesty, tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, persistence, openness to new ideas, and sheer luck have been integral to discoveries, identifying specific studies which demonstrate how scientific conclusions are open to modification as new data are collected, or researching classroom and real-world standards for peer review.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Analyze the pure and applied research nature of science, evaluating public perceptions of value of scientific research, or assessing short- and long-term risks/benefits of specific pure research which directly led, or may lead, to direct applications.
  2. Analyze career and occupational decisions that are affected by a knowledge of science, associating scientific concepts considered in career-specific decisions (e.g., use of pesticides by farmers, choosing ink for printing), or explaining chemical/physical interactions in occupational settings (e.g., insect abatement programs, waste water treatment).
  3. Analyze how resource management and technologies accommodate population trends, explaining factors needed to sustain and enhance the quality of Earth's water, quantifying benefits, costs, limitations and consequences involved in using scientific technologies or resources, or assessing global consequences of ecosystem modifications.
  4. Analyze claims used in advertising and marketing strategies for scientific validity, collecting statements of purported scientific studies to evaluate mathematical validity, or researching scientific foundations use (or manipulation) in marketing and advertising strategies for target populations.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.I is aligned to standard 11A, stage I (ninth and tenth grades). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.I - Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11B.I - Historic Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.I - Diffusion Through a Cellular MembranePDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to analyze common and specific cellular organelles and functions.
  • 12B.I - Population DynamicsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to explain population model studies to determine limiting factors and mathematical patterns of population growth in real-world situations.
  • 12C.I - Discovering the Structure of the AtomPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to investigate atomic and nuclear structure of matter by examining historical atomic theories.
  • 12D.I - Fast Cars and Roll-OverPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to investigate motion relationships in natural and forced settings.
  • 12E.I - Historic Earth Science InnovationsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to research the engineering feats, innovations or models of earth sciences.
  • 12F.I - Stellar Spectral FingerprintsPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design to explore the electromagnetic spectrum with an emphasis on bright-line spectra.
  • 13A.I - Safety Knowledge Base ChangesPDF Document
    Students will apply the accepted practices of science in the context of safety policies and the changes in scientific knowledge over time.
  • 13B.I - Science and CareersPDF Document
    Students will apply the interactions of the concepts, principles and interconnections of the life, physical and earth/space sciences to analyze career and occupational decisions.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

 Stage J

Descriptors

11A — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of scientific inquiry.

  1. Formulate issue-hypothesis, reviewing literature as primary reading sources, differentiating between subjective/objective data and their usefulness to the issue, or examining applicable existent surveys, impact studies, or models.
  2. Design an issue investigation, proposing applicable survey and interview instruments and methodologies, selecting appropriate simulations, or projecting possible viewpoints, variables, applicable data sets and formats for consideration.
  3. Conduct issue investigation (following all procedural and safety precautions), using appropriate technologies, interviewing associated entities or experts, testing applicable simulation models, or completing all data collection requirements.
  4. Interpret and analyze results to produce findings and issue resolution options, evaluating data sets and trends to explore unexpected responses and data distractors, evaluating validity and reliability, or substantiating basis of inferences, deductions, and perceptions.
  5. Report, display and defend the process and findings of issue investigation, critiquing findings by self and peer review, generating further questions or issues for consideration, evaluating comparable issue resolutions or responses for action, or generalizing public opinion responses.

11B — Students who meet the standard know and apply the concepts, principles, and processes of technological design.

  1. Formulate proposals for innovative technological design, generating ideas for innovations and variables, identifying design constraints due to access to tools, materials, and time, or researching applicable scientific principles or concepts.
  2. Design and conduct technological innovation testing, developing the sequence of the design with visualizations, incorporating the appropriate safety, available technology and equipment capabilities into construction of design, or repeating procedural steps for multiple trials.
  3. Collect and record data accurately, using consistent metric measuring and recording techniques and media with necessary precision, documenting data from instruments accurately in selected format, or graphing data appropriately to show relation to variables in design solution proposal.
  4. Interpret and represent results of analysis to produce findings, comparing data sets to design criteria for suitability, acceptability, benefits, or proposing explanations for sources of error in the data set for process or product design flaws.
  5. Report the process and results of a design investigation, explaining application to appropriate scientific principle or concept, communicating anecdotal and quantitative observations, analyzing a logical explanation of success or errors, or generating additional design modifications which can be tested later.

12A — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt, and change.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain biochemical reactions, diagramming metabolic, hormonal, regulatory, feedback or transport molecular models in and between organ systems, explaining homeostasis, or tracing the balance of cellular ATP.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain new biological technologies, projecting possible implications of current research (e.g., Human Genome Project, immune system responses).
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to synthesize the principles of genetic studies, examining phenotypic and genotypic displays, modeling predictable dominance outcomes and probabilities, or making connections to early and current research in agriculture, forensics, medicine, etc.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to examine explanations of evolution, researching how genetic similarities are conserved between species, genera, families, etc., analyzing the testing process for acceptance by the scientific community, referencing geographic, geologic, or anthropologic evidence for the sequencing of the genus, Homo, or introducing the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA basis of genetic kinship of the species.
  5. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain disease from the organelle-to-population levels, explaining body defenses to infectious disease in various organisms, or researching historic and on-going efforts to prevent, cure or treat diseases.

12B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to research the sustainability of water resources, sketching and quantifying the hydrologic cycle locally and globally, describing the role of oceans on climatic systems, describing the impact of invasive organisms, alterations of chemical and microbial concentrations (pollutants, salinity), global and site average temperatures, simulating water supply recharge/deficit/surplus and groundwater infiltration, modeling effects of point source and non-point source pollution, or explaining water and sewage treatment.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to research the sustainability of land resources, studying the role of biotic and abiotic soil components in decomposition and nutrient cycling, collecting data on soil composition, porosity, permeability, fertility etc., or quantifying the impact of topsoil and mineral preservation, erosion, and reclamation.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to research the sustainability of air resources, modeling the atmospheric layers with their currents and temperature inversions, or explaining the percentage chemical compositions and conversions at varying levels as associated with the greenhouse effect and ozone depletion or acid-rain concentrations.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to research the sustainability of energy sources, comparing alternative natural sources of energy to fossil energy sources in terms of risks, costs, benefits, supplies, efficiencies, storage, and renewability, or analyzing impacts of conservation measures and recycling on energy consumption.

12C — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain chemical bonding and reactions, balancing chemical reactions using formulas and equations to quantify reaction masses, volumes and ratios, examining factors that affect capacity to react or rates (concentrations, pH, catalysts, molarity, temperature, etc.), or referencing the bonding potential and strengths within and between atoms and molecules.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain atomic and sub-atomic structures and energy, describing the composition of the nucleus and its transformations in nuclear reactions and predicting energy released and absorbed, explaining atomic structures to masses, volumes, charges, and isotopic connections, or explaining schematic designs for devices to detect, analyze, produce such structures or processes.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explain wave theory, explaining the wave and particle nature of light, constructing tests for reflection, refraction, image formation by mirrors and lenses, diffraction, and polarization, describing common examples of optical devices, or addressing light in the context of the human eye (and other light-sensitive animals).

12D — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological design to explore the nature of forces,comparing gravitational, electromagnetic, nuclear strong and weak interactive forces, or describing the impact of these forces at all levels.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore the basics of general and special relativity, identifying the basic tenets of Galilean transformations, Newtonian relativity, Einstein's postulates, Hawking's theorems, etc., or describing real-world applications to these postulates.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore gravitation in terms of space physics, applying gravitational potential energy and satellites, or describing the applications of rocket propulsion.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore thermodynamics, explaining the kinetic theory of gases, the ideal gas laws, calculating temperature and pressure variations of gases, specific heat values, and heat capacities of solids and liquids and mechanical equivalents of heat, calculating thermal expansion and transfer capabilities of different substances, or explaining entropy in common terms and examples.

12E — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of Earth and its resources.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries and technological designs to analyze meteorological research, defining and quantifying factors which affect local and global weather and climate, relating earth-to-solar interrelationships, or applying local or global topographic features to weather and climate.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze geological research, modeling the formation of volcanoes, earthquakes, ocean floor spreading, and tectonic plates with quantitative data, explaining technologies which determine relative and absolute age, or documenting effect of natural and human-influenced erosion and deposition that have changed the Earth's surface.
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to analyze oceanographic research, describing current ocean research, projecting potential resources from mining the oceans, proposing ocean levels from varied data associated with global warming, or Quantifying Earth's water budget.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to synthesize the earth sciences, describing the flow of energy in different earth subsystems and their physical and chemical effects on atmosphere, land, and water, explaining theories of the origin and evolution of Earth's oceans, atmosphere and land masses.

12F — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth's place in it.

  1. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate historical studies of the universe, comparing schematics, optics, development and capabilities of telescopes and spectroscopes, examining data collections of Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, Newton, Galileo, etc. as the basis for their discoveries or theories and current research.
  2. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate current and proposed research studies of the universe, comparing schematics, optics, development and capabilities of spectrophotometric technologies, explaining the Doppler effect in terms of red and blue shifts, reporting on the newest discoveries from the Hubble Space Telescope, ground-based or satellite counterparts, etc. exploring the mathematical calculations and evidence associated with the Big Bang Theory, or
  3. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to investigate the energetic reactions of stars, explaining the fusion process and its associated nuclear and mathematical calculations, predicting the gravitational collapse of stars of different masses, evaluating the supporting evidence for the size, age and expansion of the universe.
  4. Apply scientific inquiries or technological designs to explore exobiological possibilities, comparing different elemental life forms on earth, or researching evidence associated with existence of past life on solar system bodies.

13A — Students who meet the standard know and apply accepted practices of science.

  1. Apply appropriate principles of safety in pure and applied research studies, examining animal care precautions for adherence to safety standards, referencing applicable chemical storage, handling, and disposal procedure regulations, researching procedures and policies to eliminate or reduce risk in potentially hazardous activities, or citing federal or state agency requirements for employees for safety regulations in science research settings.
  2. Apply scientific habits of mind to current pure and applied research studies in life, environmental, physical, earth, and space sciences, interviewing scientists about how they address validity of scientific claims and theories and/or their understanding of scientific habits of mind (including sheer luck) and how they have been integral to their own research, recognizing limitations of investigation methods, sample sets, technologies, or procedures, questioning sources of information and representation of data, recognizing selective or distorted use of data, discrepancies and poor argument, distinguishing opinion from supported theory, tracing citations from research studies for validity and reliability, or reporting on peer review and juried panel review in research approval and scientific community acceptance.

13B — Students who meet the standard know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology, and society.

  1. Analyze challenges created by international cooperation and competition in scientific knowledge and technological advances, explaining multinational corporations' challenges or impact for resource acquisition, or researching the cooperative efforts and dilemmas associated with global partnerships.
  2. Analyze scientific breakthroughs in terms of societal and technological effects, citing how beliefs and attitudes influence advances, examining global distribution of energy, natural or fiscal resources, or evaluating how scientific advances from different cultures are received.
  3. Analyze environmental impact studies, describing the design and procedures, synthesizing the findings and justifying the recommendations, or comparing methods for minimizing pollution or procedures for monitoring environmental quality.
  4. Analyze local, state, national, global scientific policies in terms of costs, benefits, and effects, identifying policies which have affected local needs, costs, or products, assessing national or global costs of policies from American or non-American perspectives, or evaluating data used in media explanations of resource, technology, or policy impact.
  5. Analyze how scientific and technological progress have affected job markets and everyday life, investigating projected trends over 2-3 decades, or assessing costs for technological progress on personal, governmental, economic and ecosystem impact in the sciences.

Assessments

Science Classroom Assessments Aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards.

The assessments are coded according to standard and stage. Example: 11A.J is aligned to standard 11A, stage J (eleventh and twelfth grades). Sample student work, when available, will follow the assessment.

  • 11A.J - Issue Inquiry OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry within classroom investigations.
  • 11B.J - Design OverviewPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design within classroom investigations.
  • 12A.J - Real Family GeneticsPDF Document
    Students will apply the process of scientific inquiry to synthesize the principles of genetic studies.
  • 12B.J - Groundwater RealitiesPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of scientific inquiry to research the sustainability of water resources through an environmental impact study.
  • 12C.J - Molar RatioPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and process of scientific inquiry to explain chemical bonding and reactions.
  • 12D.J - Specific Heat of MetalsPDF Document
    Students will apply the concepts, principles and process of technological design to explore thermodynamics.
  • 12E.J - Analyzing the Research of the EarthPDF Document
    Students will apply the processes of technological design in historic, current and potential earth science research technology settings.
  • 12F.J - Discovering a Law of Space PhysicsPDF Document
    Students will apply processes of scientific inquiries to explore the nature of forces.
  • 13A.J - How Scientists Really WorkPDF Document
    Students will question the accepted practices of science by scientists and their interactions with technology and society.
  • 13B.J - Futures for SciencesPDF Document
    Students will analyze challenges created by international cooperation and competition in scientific knowledge, technological advances, policy-making and implementation from global perspectives.

Note: All documents are in PDF File .pdf format - please visit adobe.com to download the most current version of Adobe Reader​

Alternatives to Dissection Resources

In 1998 and in 2000, the Illinois’ legislature mandated that sources of information should be provided to and from our schools on the alternatives for dissection. As a local autonomy state, our local districts make policy decisions independently in these matters. Our resources have been offered to provide position statements from a variety of professional organizations and applicable societies, as well as guidelines to help make decisions at the personal, parental, classroom and administrative levels.

Many teaching and learning settings nationwide have adjusted curricular and instructional strategies away from their traditional or historical methods in science to reflect the advances of technology, the environmental safety implications and cost-benefit considerations in science classrooms. Please review the attached materials (copied from our website) to study how Illinois schools, teachers and students are making more informed decisions about this matter.

* * * This page has been archived. The content on this page may no longer be in effect. * * *

Contact Information