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2008 Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Who Are Highly Qualified

School Type # of Core Academic Classes (Total) # of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Who Are Highly Qualified Percentage of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Who Are Highly Qualified # of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Who Are NOT Highly Qualified Percentage of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Who Are NOT Highly Qualified
All schools 160,709 159,630 99.3% 1,079 0.7%
Elementary level High-poverty schools 22,1319 21,925 98.2% 394 1.8%
Low-poverty schools 37,131 37,061 99.8% 70 0.2%
All elementary schools 122,429 121,625 99.3% 804 0.7%
Secondary level High-poverty schools 8,711 8,508 97,7% 203 2.3%
Low-poverty schools 13,878 13,853 99.8% 25 0.2%
All secondary schools 38,280 38,005 99.3% 275 0.7%

2008 Reasons Core Academic Classes Are Taught by Teachers Who Are Not Highly Qualified

Elementary School Classes Percentage
Elementary school classes taught by certified general education teachers who did not pass a subject-knowledge test or (if eligible) have not demonstrated subject-matter competency through HOUSSE 31.0%
Elementary school classes taught by certified special education teachers who did not pass a subject-knowledge test or have not demonstrated subject-matter competency through HOUSSE 12.2%
Elementary school classes taught by teachers who are not fully certified (and are not in an approved alternative route program) 19.9%
Other (please explain in comment box below) 36.9%
Total 100.0%

Secondary School Classes Percentage
Secondary school classes taught by certified general education teachers who have not demonstrated subject-matter knowledge in those subjects (e.g., out-of-field teachers) 21.4%
Secondary school classes taught by certified special education teachers who have not demonstrated subject-matter competency in those subjects 28.2%
Secondary school classes taught by teachers who are not fully certified (and are not in an approved alternative route program) 31.3%
Other (please explain in comment box below) 19.1%
Total 100.0%

2008 Poverty Quartiles and Metrics Used

High-Poverty Schools (more than what %) Low-Poverty Schools (less than what %)
Elementary schools 66.5% 16.9%
Poverty metric used Low-income students come from families receiving public aid, live in institutions for neglected or delinquent children, are supported in foster homes with public funds, or are eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches. High-poverty schools are the lowest 25 percent. Low-poverty schools are the highest 25 percent.
Secondary schools 46.0% 15.7%
Poverty metric used Low-income students come from families receiving public aid, live in institutions for neglected or delinquent children, are supported in foster homes with public funds, or are eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches. High-poverty schools are the lowest 25 percent. Low-poverty schools are the highest 25 percent.
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